Kit Homes

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by jessimeredith, May 3, 2005.

  1. jessimeredith

    jessimeredith That's relativity. Supporter

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    Anyone here have one?

    I've been looking at some of the offerings for kits out there and am increasingly liking the cost and ease of the domes. Anyone have any insight on the kits?

    What do you think of them, are they practical and the such?
     
  2. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    My (ex) husband was interested in dome homes at one time, so we looked into them, but decided against them. There are no straight and level walls in the entire house for mounting shelves, kitchen cabinets, and so on. Ditto for laying out interior walls. Also, there's a lot of roof to develop leaks, and it would be a real pain to get up there to fix them.

    If it's a round house you want, there are other ways to get a round house that doesn't have all the disadvantages of the domes.

    Kathleen
     

  3. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    Ease? Hope you like cutting angles. There construction takes longer form all the angles.

    Cost? Because of the angles you end up with about 15% more waste.

    If it's round you want, Check out Deltec
     
  4. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) Can't tell you anything about domes except they look really impractical, but my brother bought a two story Tudor style kit home when he bought his property in 'Vegas. They sent it a package at a time(on big trucks)as they were needed and it went up pretty smoothly. The biggest problems were waiting for inspectors to show up when they were needed. That took longer than anything else!

    That was 20 years ago and it's still a very nice house. Of course there's been remodeling and additions to the garage etc but it's held up really well.

    Good luck with your plans..


    LQ
     
  5. jessimeredith

    jessimeredith That's relativity. Supporter

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    Okay, so ease was the wrong word to use, lol. I meant to say the outer shell construction seems a bit easier for just the two of us to handle.

    That's really what we're looking for, something that just the two of us can do. Without it taking 9-10 mths. Hence the whole looking into the kits.
     
  6. tamilee

    tamilee Well-Known Member

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    Hi jessimeredith;
    I'm sure I'll get jumped for this one; but; I was interested in dome homes and looked at the kits. They seemed really neat and from what I read they were suppose to be energy efficient.
    However; when I saw one in person, it was well, shocking. It looked so out of place in a woodland setting. The contrast between it and the beautiful landscape made me physically ill, it appeared to be so disharmonius with nature. This was the reason the owners were selling it. I was told this after I looked at the place and told them I really wasn't interested and why. I could never get used to the rooms not being rectangular, the interior angles looked "wrong". This is of course just my personal opinion. There are websites that sell kits for small country houses/cabins.
    My husband and I built our home ourselves. It took us about a year but that was because of all the inspections we had to have. My husband's uncle was an electrician so he did the wiring. Our county code requires ALL houses to be grid tied. Anyway the house is 24' x 32' with a tin top and a sleeping loft. Tin tops/metal roofs are very practical. We live in hurricane alley and our home has withstood many hurricanes over the last 25 years. While our neighbors have shingled 3x due to the storms our roof has stayed in tact and has no leaks. I'm sharing this to let you know that you can build your house yourself, without a kit. There are home building websites where you can post questions to others should you have any problems or questions. There are many knowledgeable intelligent people on this forum who could offer advice should you choose to stick build your home. unless you are absolutely sold on the dome idea, try looking at other plans. AS I stated in the first part of this post, that type of home MAY BE harder to sell if you really don't like it once it's finished. Type in dome homes in a search engine and take a visual tour.
    tamilee
     
  7. JessieGirl

    JessieGirl Well-Known Member

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    We are planning to build a steel home which comes in a kit. Check out this site: www.allsteelhomes.com