Kiowa

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Randy Dandy, Aug 29, 2004.

  1. Randy Dandy

    Randy Dandy Well-Known Member

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    I'm new at this so any help would be great. I'm wanting to plant the Kiowa for the deer, turkey, and whatever we can get, and eat first. Are the thorny blackberries that bad compared to the thornless ? I also have emailed Simmons Farms 3 different times asking questions, but I'm not getting a response. Are they still in business ? We are trying to get a house built in the very near future, and I'm wanting to plant things for the deer and turkey as they're eating place will soon be disturbed. I thought about Johnson grass for cover, and bedding purpose in the back, then blackberries, then about 10 Persimmon trees. Any suggestions would be great. Sorry for all the questions at one time, but we are kinda busy with financing, builders, ect... Thanks, Randy
     
  2. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

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    If you're planting blackberries mostly for the wildlife, I'd stick to thorny types. My reasoning on that is that the wild berries are thorny. They evolved thorns to keep deer and other herbivores from eating the entire plant right down to the ground. They can nibble the tenderer portions, but can't kill the plant. Most birds have no trouble navigating in the thorns, and the thorns provide some protection for birds who choose to nest in the blackberries. Or for turkeys who can nest in the interior of a thicket and have some protection that way.

    Now, if you're planting them for yourself, that's your own call. :D

    We're putting in thorny ones. I wanted half and half, but hubby says blackberries should have thorns, by golly! That was before I took the city boy blackberry picking. I wonder if he's changed his mind? :haha:

    The deer will love you for the persimmons.

    On the grasses, I'd suggest looking at what the true natives there are/were...not pasture grasses, but natives. In our area, pasture grasses have led to a lot less quail, as they need clump grasses, and can't get through the denser undergrowth of pasture and hayfields. I don't know if quail and other small stuff are a concern where you are, though.

    Best of luck. I'm thrilled that you're thinking of the wild folk as you settle in. :worship:

    Meg :)
     

  3. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I don't know much about turkeys, but deer LOVE alfalfa. Here in Kansas alfalfa does well: I am not sure about your area.

    I DO know that in your area blackberries are native. That means that they should spread REAALY well! :eek: Keep that in mind when you decide where to plant them.
     
  4. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Johnson grass is a noxious plant here that the FSA requires Farmers to eradicate on any ground in the Gov. program. I agree that it would be good wildlife cover and feed the birds that will in turn spread it as far and wide as they can fly.
     
  5. Randy Dandy

    Randy Dandy Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all very much for your inputs. What kind of grass (low mantenance) could I plant that the wildlife could use as cover, food, ect... I think I would like a tall type of grass. Thanks, Randy
     
  6. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

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    Here's one place to start checking grass species.
    http://www.lrn.usace.army.mil/pao/digest/0604/STORY07.HTM

    I did a search for 'native grasses tennessee'. Came up with a fair amount of stuff.

    Also check with the forestry division. NC has a tree sales program, where you can order small seedlings in lots of 200-250 trees for $20-$25. Either all one type or mixes that work for different area or for wildlife. You can always split that with someone else. Since Tennessee is apparently trying to re-introduce native grasses (see how much reading I did for you!), there may be a program to assist with it. I did find one program, but you have to dedicate a minumum of 40 acres to grasses, and I don't think that's what you're looking for.

    I wish you luck. Once again, thanks for looking out for the wild folk.

    Meg :)