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Discussion Starter #1
other than digging them up (they seem to spread/come back) how can I kill them permanently?

Why:
How to make tomatoes grow...
till garden, rake smooth, carefully plant small seeds. In between
seeds as 'companion planting' are onions - which help tomatoes. Watch
the rain fall. Check the garden. Watch the rain fall. Check the
garden. Watch the weeds and grass come up. Start pulling. Give up.
Watch for tomatoes to come up.

Give up.
Go to the local FFA greenhouse. Buy 3 tomato plants.
Dig 3 small holes to transplant them. Look over. See 7 tomato plants
that I swear were not there yesterday. Sigh. Plant 3 tomato plants.
Go to house. Start finding salsa recipes.



Go back out and look to make sure what I saw. Spy 3 small 1/2 pinkie
finger sized white things. :-( get shovel. chop mushrooms into
smithereens.
Fight back tears. They look innocent but are death. Death. Final.
Cold. Permanent. They don't kill right away. They make you think it's
ok until several days later they shut down all body systems.

Picture LilGirl gasping for air. Close eyes to shake that away.
Remember Jessie crawling up to safety to sleep by me...before she too
died and joined her sister over the Rainbow Bridge. :waa:
Look over at the graves of Jessie and LilGirl. chop mushrooms into
smaller pieces. Stomp on them. Wave off Lika who thinks I've lost my
mind and tell Luke to stop barking at the guy walking through the
next lot.
Call the little male pup...pick him up. Dodge puppy kisses and look
at the graves. Go back inside to take dogs in. Promise to search inch
by inch the yard, garden, parking area etc. Look up how to kill
mushrooms.
Make note to go get hoe and whatever it takes to kill mushrooms.
Swear to never let one live.

Look over at sleeping dogs. Pup comes over to crawl in lap ajd help
me type.
end this to hold him
 

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JanH said:
other than digging them up (they seem to spread/come back) how can I kill them permanently?

What we call mushrooms are actually only the blossoms of the mushroom. It would be like you cutting all the blossoms off of a well established rose plant and wondering why the roses keep coming back.

The Mycelium is the mass underground that grows like a bush in the Rose analogy, this is what you would have to kill.

How to do that depends on the conditions and the mushroom. You could easily spread it inadvertantly. I would try to identify it. Perhaps your County Extension office could help, or a Master Gardener in your area. If you are having this much trouble with this species in your conditions, it is likely there is a lot of knowledge about it locally.

Good Luck! (Hey, maybe its edible - I wish I had a Morel problem I couldn't kill!)

~Michael in Boise
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Michael83705 said:
JanH said:
other than digging them up (they seem to spread/come back) how can I kill them permanently?

What we call mushrooms are actually only the blossoms of the mushroom. It would be like you cutting all the blossoms off of a well established rose plant and wondering why the roses keep coming back.
The Mycelium is the mass underground that grows like a bush in the Rose analogy, this is what you would have to kill.
How to do that depends on the conditions and the mushroom. You could easily spread it inadvertantly. I would try to identify it. Perhaps your County Extension office could help, or a Master Gardener in your area. If you are having this much trouble with this species in your conditions, it is likely there is a lot of knowledge about it locally.

Good Luck! (Hey, maybe its edible - I wish I had a Morel problem I couldn't kill!)

~Michael in Boise
Thanks. It's *not* edible...that's why it killed 2 of my pups. Have found out it's green gill mushrooms. Had Jessie in at the vet as soon as it was apparent it *was* the mushrooms...and despite injections, fluids, etc etc she died 7 hours later. Had learned they don't poison/kill right away...it hits days later.
 

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Not a problem.. They will dry up and leave you with a grassy weed jungle.. Now there is something to commit mahem on. Don't get too violent and whack down your salsa makins.
I've heard of mushroom dogs being used to locate the wild morels. But training them might be difficult. You might start your pup on that right away.
 

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JanH said:
Thanks. It's *not* edible...that's why it killed 2 of my pups. Have found out it's green gill mushrooms. Had Jessie in at the vet as soon as it was apparent it *was* the mushrooms...and despite injections, fluids, etc etc she died 7 hours later. Had learned they don't poison/kill right away...it hits days later.
I know whats its like to lose dogs. I don't know how after re-reading your post, but I missed the dogs deaths from ingestion the first time. I didn't mean to treat it lightly with my comment about Morels. Honestly.

I have no idea how to kill green gills. I even looked them up.

http://www.floridagardener.com/misc/Fairyrings.htm

Hopefully someone else will be able to provide more help.

Again, my sympathy for the passing of your pups.

~Michael in Boise
 

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Please excuse me also. I didn't connect the mushrooms to the graves. I really thought the graves were kittens. I've never known of mushrooms killing animals. Sorry.
 

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mushrooms depend on high organic matter levels it might help to always rake up yard clippings and use them in the garden areas .also high nitrogen chemical fertilize will break down the coarse carbon organic matter that mushrooms depend on .
 

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No hard feelings on the posts. I'd never heard of dogs eating mushrooms and dying either. I have since this happened. Thanks George for the input...I knew a lot of grass/weed killers wouldn't work but didn't know what *would*. Removal of "habitat" would work, or altering it.
Has been delayed slightly...on the *other* side a neighbor's tree crashed down and over the fence into the garden. Removed enough to let the corn keep growing. But have to remove the tree before finding more! :haha:
 

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I call them toadstools. When you see them in your yard, all you can do is destroy them! Mow them down! Use the weedeater & keep the animals away from them.
 

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Prayers for your healing. A dog isnt just a dog, he's/she is part of a family unit-your family unit. A dog we used to have was allergic to the yard. Not all of it, just parts and it seemed a different part every few weeks. Dh would go out in the yard and spend time trying to find the culprit and getting rid of it. My sweet boy was my first pet and he was very attached to me(and I to him)He would come up to the porch, swollen face and not able to breathe. The vet said give him Benedryl...it worked but still scary as he slowly drited off to sleep and I wasn't sure if he'd wake up again. We had to remove him to another home for other reasons...but I remember vividly watching my sweet boy panting and begging me with his eyes to do something and all you could do is wait for the meds to work. Now our other dog will be 8 this christmas..his time is running short as his breed only averages about 10 yrs, from what I have researched.

Again, prayers for you, life is not fair. It will be ok tho...give yourself time and thn dig out the shovels and mutilate those rat b**tards took your little bundle prematurely. :yeeha:
 
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I would like to disagree on the fact that mushrooms are the "blossom". They are really the fruiting bodies and the reason they keep growing and spreading is that you, or whoever is taking them out, are whacking them, or shaking them, forcing all of their spores to spread farther out into the lawn. The fruiting bodies grow only when the fungus, or the mycelia are having a hard time staying alive. Fruiting bodies are mainly for reproduction (spores). Hundreds of housands to millions of spores are held in just one fruiting body of the mushroom, but only a few actually live to grow into mushrooms.
One idea to get rid of them is pick them very carefully out of the ground, so as not to spread the spores. Other than that, I have no clue.
Dogs are the best; it has to be horrible to lose them to something so simple. I wish you good luck with your endeavors.
 
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Unregistered said:
I would like to disagree on the fact that mushrooms are the "blossom". They are really the fruiting bodies and the reason they keep growing and spreading is that you, or whoever is taking them out, are whacking them, or shaking them, forcing all of their spores to spread farther out into the lawn. The fruiting bodies grow only when the fungus, or the mycelia are having a hard time staying alive. Fruiting bodies are mainly for reproduction (spores). Hundreds of housands to millions of spores are held in just one fruiting body of the mushroom, but only a few actually live to grow into mushrooms.
One idea to get rid of them is pick them very carefully out of the ground, so as not to spread the spores. Other than that, I have no clue.
Dogs are the best; it has to be horrible to lose them to something so simple. I wish you good luck with your endeavors.
(I didn't understand the 'grave' part of the message either, thanks for making it clearer & sorry to hear it.)

I agree with this message, chopping up & trampling the toadstool is just spreading the spores, which is kind of the seed of these things, not that they are plants.

Mushrooms like it damp, and they live off already decomposed plant material. They love 10 year old tree stumps you don't even know are rotting under the ground, or old compost piles of manure or lawn clippings, or stuff like that. They don't like commercial fertilizers, and there are fungacides out there, tho I've no idea how or what or if they work....

With the millions of spores & how a spore will wait for generations for the right conditions to regrow, it's hard to ever get rid of them, unless you change the environment to what they do not like.

Change the drainage, change the organic makeup of the area, or change the ph of the soil.

Never dealing with this problem other than seeing a few grow around very old tree stumps in very wet weather or the spot mom dumped her lawn clippings; I don't know what exactly direction to go with that, but one or all 3 of those conditions will deal with the mushroom habitat. This may also have negative impacts on your garden or lawn, depending what variables need changing.

--->Paul
 
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