Kill My Grass

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by big rockpile, Nov 7, 2006.

  1. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    Thinking instead of Raking my Leaves,just let them kill my Grass.Figure its easier to turn back Fire in Leaves instead of Grass.

    I am cleaning back away from my Buildings.

    What you Guys think?

    big rockpile
     
  2. poorboy

    poorboy Well-Known Member Supporter

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  3. omnicat

    omnicat Well-Known Member

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    Well....I was actually going to do just that - at least under my mature, but Chlorotic, White Oak. Eventually put a few shade/small forest plant - type things...
     
  4. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    Hey the Wife went and bought a New Rake just looking over the situation :shrug:

    big rockpile
     
  5. poorboy

    poorboy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Helpful wimmins..LOL:) :cool:
     
  6. Thoughthound

    Thoughthound Well-Known Member

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    Let the grass die and reseed with miniature clover. Reduces the amount of mowing.
     
  7. doohap

    doohap Another American Patriot

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    I, for one, don't rake the leaves in my yard. I leave them all winter. Come spring I rake and while all my neighbors yards look dead and brown, my yard has the most beautiful spring-green grass!

    Leave them lay, I say.

    Peace and smiles,
    doohap
     
  8. Danaus29

    Danaus29 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Old dried leaves will burn quicker than you think. When the forest fire fighters make a firebreak they clear the area of all dried vegetation. One of our neighbors nearly burned his house down by neglecting a pile of burning leaves. He hadn't raked the area around the fire and it spread under the leaves left on the ground.
     
  9. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Having had oaks and maples, I found the best thing to do (unless you have kids who want to play in a pile leaves) is to run the mower over them. This breaks them up sufficiently to break down quickly. They don't lie on top of the grass, but fall down into it. In the spring, you've got grass coming up nice and green with no old wet leaves.
     
  10. GREENCOUNTYPETE

    GREENCOUNTYPETE Moderator Staff Member

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    at the place i used to work we blew them into long piles and lit them up from one end and let them burn the grass comes back in the spring

    now i live in town and there is no burning they pick up at curb and compost them but mostly i mow into piles this reduces the volume and gets them ento piles with minimal effort then i have a tarp that i lay out next to the pile rake them on then drag them into the garden and roto till them in and save a pile in the garden for mulching potatoes in the spring potatoes grow great in a thick leaf mulch the tarp is the most efficient way of moving leaves i have found

    composting is better than burning no smoke and nice dirt
     
  11. roughingit

    roughingit knitwit

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    I like to leave them be and compost the neighbors instead. They make great compost and mulch. I do like the clover idea though, I'm not much for grass.
     
  12. bill not in oh

    bill not in oh Well-Known Member

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    Dutch (white) clover. Grows to about 3", is somewhat shade tolerant and once established will tolerate drought. I grew this with some success in my yard in a New Mexico pine forest. The soil was a bit too acidic, but once I limed it a little, it was much better.