Kid question

Discussion in 'Goats' started by RedneckWoman, Mar 2, 2005.

  1. RedneckWoman

    RedneckWoman Well-Known Member

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    If you all don't mind I have a quick question about kids. A friend of mine has two four week old Alpines that I will be picking up today and my question is, with all this cold weather (in the 30s during the day here low 30s and 20s at night) will it be safe to let them live in my barn or do I need to find some way to keep them in my house? I ask because my friend's barn is heated but mine isn't and I have only had fully grown goats no kids. TYIA.
     
  2. creeklady2000

    creeklady2000 Well-Known Member

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    if it was me I would not put them right out in your cold barn do you have like aporch or something that is warmer but not hot ???? that way you could get them used to being out side slowly take them out side a few times aday and if you get a warm day say above 38 put them out for the day this is what I do and then I move them out for good
     

  3. manygoatsnmore

    manygoatsnmore Well-Known Member Supporter

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    How warm is your friend's barn? You would want to make the temperature change as gradually as possible for the good of the kids. They are already going to be stressed a bit with the move to a new environment. If they are not in a really warm barn now, you could give them a small house inside of your barn, well bedded with straw, where they could snuggle up together and keep each other warm. It doesn't have to be fancy, even a cardboard box will do, although a doghouse would be sturdier. The main thing is to make it just big enough for them to get in and snuggle up. Then their body heat will heat the box and keep them toasty. Checking on them during the night to make sure they're staying warm would be a good idea, too.
     
  4. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Your larger goats may also decide to be mean to them as well. Those igloo doghouses are nice or even just a lean to piece of plywood or chip board against barn wall with a 2*4.

    If they are used to being warm then you have to gradually get them down to outside temps or you could put sweaters on them...make sure there bottles are still warmed!
     
  5. rhjacobi

    rhjacobi Well-Known Member

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    Hi Redneckwomen,

    If they are use to a heated barn, it might take a little while for them to get used to a cooler place, particularly in things like the thickness of the coat that they grow.

    We raise Boer goats and I keep some water in the barns. The water won't usually freeze in the barns until it gets to around 20 outside (natural heating not heated). This is what I partially use to judge. If I have a weaker or seemingly premature newborn or something like that, I'll bring them onto our back porch where it is warmer. By the time they are four weeks, I don't usually have to worry about them even in colder weather than you mentioned.

    This is all relative to how dependent they have grown to the heated barn that they are used to and how warm and draft free your barn is. If there isn't enough heat in the ground and if there hasn't been a build up of decomposing matter under your bedding to generate heat, it may be a little cold for them even if they are four weeks old. Without knowing more, I would probably suggest erring on the side of caution. If you can, don't keep them too warm so that they can get used to and prepared for the cooler temps.

    I hope this helps a little.

    Bob
    Lynchburg, TN

     
  6. RedneckWoman

    RedneckWoman Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all for the info. They have never been outside of her barn and it pretty well stays about 65F-70F in there so rather than take chances with the little guys and worry myself silly about them I put them in my mud room. It is shut off from the rest of my house and it stays around 63F in there (no one goes in there anyway it is just there) so I thought that would be better than throwing them into a cold barn. They have an extra large pet porter with hay in there to curl up in. I think it is supposed to start warming up here soon though. One is an Alpine and the other is an Alpine X Boer, they are the cutest little things. I try to make a habit of not taking on animals that small in this kind of weather because I don't have heat out there but they were offered to me and well I just can't resist those goatie kisses :no:

    Dh, who isn't the world's biggest goat fan couldnt resist two Toggs and another Nubian (not to mention five more pigs) :eek: .............Has been a loooooooooooooong day. I need a tired smiley lol.

    Thank yall again and have a nice evening.
     
  7. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    We have had a freeze the last 2 nights. We have a 2 week old lamb and he sleeps in the greenhouse which isn't too warm. He is doing fine. We bottle feed him before going to bed and then again in the a.m. He is a Dorper/Katadian/? cross. We kept him in the house the first night and then outside. Your Alpines would probably have been fine but better safe than sorry.
     
  8. rhjacobi

    rhjacobi Well-Known Member

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    I'm not real familiar with your breeds, but I don't think any of them need 65-70 degrees. However, that is what they are used to and probably haven't even grown a winter coat because of that. Keeping them cooped up like they have been may not be the best for their health either. But, I personally think that for at least their comfort and probably for their good health and probably for a whole lot of your piece of mind, you made the right decision. We would probably bring them in also.

    Bob
    Lynchburg, TN.