Kicked the vet off the property....

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Reauxman, Jul 8, 2006.

  1. Reauxman

    Reauxman Well-Known Member

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    We have a 4 acre parcel about 5 miles from the house. Our horses and a good friend at the time's horses have been there since 2000. Things have gone sour between myself and the other woman since, but I have tried to be civil.

    Today I go out to feed and her horse is laying down and she's out there. I try not to talk to her too much, but she mentioned the vet was coming. I just went out there and the vet is there. Vet comes to me and says the goats look thin and the doe is going to get mastisis. I explained nicely that the doe is fine and gets milked once a day at about 4 PM and has been for 3 months. She then said she is way too thin, look at the other goat and then look at her. I explained that the other goat was a buck and wasn't giving almost a gallon a day and feeding a kid. She went away mumbling something. She later comes back and says the goats have worms. That blew it. I told her she was to get the $%^& off the property now. If there was something she needed to settle with the other lady to do so in the parking lot of the store down the street. I was calling the cops if she wasn't out of the gate in a 60 seconds.

    I hate ignorant people that think they know something about everything, but even worse is vets that do....
     
  2. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    got any pics of your goats? don't you think it would be interesting to hear what others on this board think? there are some pretty sharp people on here.
     

  3. computerchick

    computerchick Keeper of the Zoo

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    Well that's quite rude. I'd ask her how she can do a worm analysis without a fecal or famancha exam. Tell her she could make MILLIONS if this is her talent....

    Just be ready with a fecal exam or a chart of when wormed, etc just in case welfare shows up - vets in most states are required to report.

    Sorry you had to deal with a rude vet.

    Andrea
    www.arare-breed.net
    www.faintinggoat.net
     
  4. Reauxman

    Reauxman Well-Known Member

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    I don't keep a "chart", but do worm every month on the 15 th along with the horses. I'll gladly provice a sample for a test.

    Camera is broken and have no use for it other than to take pics of the goats for you. I could use my phone, but the pics are bad anyhow. Her impression of thin was being able to FEEL the hipbones and determine there was not enough meat over them. DUH if there was they would be extremely fat. These goats get free choice hay and pellets. They aren't thin.

     
  5. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    my goats get a rusty looking coat when they are wormy. had one that coughed that turned out to have lung worm. not to knock rooman, just to say that there *are* outward signs of worm infestation.
     
  6. Reauxman

    Reauxman Well-Known Member

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    This vet would have never known outward signs of worms. She couldn't even sex them, kept asking what his name was when referring to my dry doe. My "nanny" goat was the one that was thin. I wouldn't trust her to work on my worse enemy.
     
  7. computerchick

    computerchick Keeper of the Zoo

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    I totally agree on the outward signs of worm infestation - but those signs aren't limited to just worms. Lice can cause the coat problems, change in diet, etc. I just think the vet was awfully rude, and didn't approach rooman in a professional manner!

    Andrea
     
  8. Idahoe

    Idahoe Menagerie More~on

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    I thought a goat giving that much milk was supposed to be thin appearing anyway. I have a cat nursing six kittens and she goes to skin and bones in a couple of days.

    I hate it too when someone who doesn't know you from Adam, or your animals, makes proclaimations like that. It puts you on the spot, and there isn't much else you can do but be "rude".
     
  9. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    I think the vet meant well but probably didn't handle the situation as she should have. That said, I also suspect RooMaN, based on his post, was already ansy and when approached was, if not actively hostile, certainly had the body language of someone who was impatient and aggrieved. Which this woman might have misinterpreted as meaning she just hadn't explained herself well. So she came back to do it again.. and unfortunately, again... until old Roo here blew a gasket.

    Which, Roo, might have given you a moments pleasure (throwing someone off your property is a real chest thumper of a moment) but if she does decide to persue this, even if you're right, you'll have to leap through happy hoops with state vets or whoever oversees animal welfare in your area.

    And doesn't THAT should like fun!

    I think YOU might better have handled this by saying "really? I wormed them... let's see.. 6/20 with Ivermectin.. If you can collect a stool sample and find evidence of an excessive worm load I'd certainly be surprised by that..."

    I've got older ewes nursing twins right now that look like they've been pulled through a lawnmower. I mean, these things are in horrible condition. But they're "healthy." As in "not carrying a worm load" and "getting adequate feed." As soon as I wean these brats they'll puff right back up again. But if a vet stood there and said "they look like they're in poor condition.." well, they ARE in poor condition. I can explain it, but yea, they look like heck. If they insisted it was worms why would I put myself in a position of having to justify my farming practices when I can tell them to help themselves to fecal material (lord knows I've got quite enough of it, thank you) and if they find what they expect to find... call me. If they don't... no harm, no foul, and maybe they've learned something.

    But there's no call to "throw them off the property" and tick them off. What's the percentage in that?
     
  10. Raftercat5

    Raftercat5 Kathy in S. Carolina

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    Rooman: Yeah, I know about stupid vets! I had my share here in my town with a certain vet. My dog was hit by a car last year and she said she can fix him for under $400. The bill was over $500, and that was just the first visit. Follow-up visits came to much more. She had to put 2 pins in his leg. One pin, as showed on the x-ray, went thru the bone and was poking into the fascia, which made a water-filled sac (seroma I think). When he finally went back to have the pins taken out, she decided to only take one out, and leave one in to help the leg be more stable. When we went to pick him up, we had to pay before we even saw him. Then they brought him out, and it wasn't until we were in the parking lot when we realized they shaved the wrong area to remove the pin. They shaved the hip on the other side!!!! Not only that, but she removed both pins because she removed the wrong one first, so then she had to remove the one that was poking thru irritating the muscle, which caused the seroma. To top it all off, the dog chewed out the staples because the collar that she sold us was too short, and he reached around it too easily. When we brought the dog back to get the staples re-done, they were put in unevenly spaced, as if an amateur did it. He chewed them out again, because she didn't have a bigger collar. He was a smallish dog, not an unusual sized dog at all. When he had a follow-up visit, we were charged for it, whereas if a person went to the dr. for a follow-up after surgery, it's usually included in the surgical fee, right? Needless to say, we have a new vet now. We brought him to the new vet to get the third set of staples after he chewed them out again. He also got a bigger collar there. Anyway, to get off my soapbox, Rooman, your goat's hip bones stick out because she had kid(s), and isn't ever going to look like she did before she was pregnant, I believe. I have 2 adult goats. One had kids, the other didn't. They're the same age, and the momma goat looks bony in the hips, altho she eats 3x as much as the other one!! I imagine when she's dryed up this winter, she'll fatten back up. We worm them regularly, and have also done fecals. Their fur is shiny and smooth, due to the black oil sunflower seeds (B.O.S.S.), which they love. They get 16% (protein) goat feed, a handful of scratch feed for a treat, about 1/2 cereal bowl of B.O.S.S., and alfalfa pellets and coastal burmuda hay. They also get minerals and baking soda free choice. But the milker is skinny. I'm not worried! Good luck with your vet problem. I think she was showing off and trying to push her weight around to get another customer.
    - Kathy
     
  11. Reauxman

    Reauxman Well-Known Member

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    I have several friends at the state vet school. One professor has taken one of my goats in before to show the students anatomy on.

    I called my vet and asked about this woman and it appears she's a transplant that was forced to move in from the NE when no one would use her any longer.

    I'm not worried, and no, she wasn't shown any hostility at first. Last year she told me that my horses were in bad condition as well because we had been having rain and I have a pal paint that likes to roll. I don't wash my horses but weekly, and especially not when there is more rain forcasted the next day. She's just off her rocker.

    I'll pray for her and I ask everyone who prays does the same.
     
  12. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    I wish my ND doe would lose some weight. She's been nursing her triplets for four months and she still looks pregnant.
     
  13. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    That is so sweet.
     
  14. brierpatch1974

    brierpatch1974 Well-Known Member

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    lol hit the vet with a law suit for touching your animals without permission. The vet was there to check another animal and not yours.

    BP
     
  15. KimM

    KimM Student of goatology.

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    Wasn't the vet there to look at the other person's horse? I think I would have simply told the vet that you have your own vet and to please take care of the animal she was called in for.
     
  16. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden Well-Known Member

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    ARen't they supposed to show thier hip bones? My does do, especially the ones that have already had a baby. The only bulky one I have is my boer buckling and that's cause he's a meat breed of course!

    kids
     
  17. myrandaandkids

    myrandaandkids Well-Known Member

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    yes i agree, mine show the hip bone, and i would have ignored her comment all together and only responded with you are here for that animal, not mine, i am perfectly content with the care givin to these animals by my vet, excuse me, i have animals to attend, and walked past her.
     
  18. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    "I think YOU might better have handled this by saying "really? I wormed them... let's see.. 6/20 with Ivermectin.. If you can collect a stool sample and find evidence of an excessive worm load I'd certainly be surprised by that...""


    Maybe this was what she was going for? That's what I wondered initially - trying to 'scare' up some business? By intimidation? It's a rare vet around HERE that knows squat about goats - mostly equine vets. More $$ in it, lol.

    Anyway, I would have felt pressured by her approach. I certainly wouldn't have paid her to do a fecal so she could 'feel' better. But that's me. Of course, she'd have had to get past the anatolian first. :)

    niki
     
  19. wooly1s

    wooly1s Well-Known Member

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    I thought a goat giving that much milk was supposed to be thin appearing anyway.

    Would that this were true for people...I "milked" for four kids, and haven't seen my hip bones since prior to the first!!! =)

    My milking/nursing does have hip bones, too...but fat happy rumens =) Must have been a horse vet!
     
  20. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

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    Sorry you had to go thru that. The only time I had it out with a vet was when they insisted they HAD to put down my dog because she had parvo. I brought my dog home and nurser her thru it. Had several puppies that got it, and nursed them all thru it. Next time the dog went to the vet the vet told me my dog was a lucky surviver. So how would the vet explain that they all lived? Wasn't even interested when I tried to tell him how I kept them alive.

    But on the other side of the coin. My little house dog was sick, coughing so bad I thought I would loose her before I could get her into town. The vet saved her. So I guess vets are good sometimes, and dumb as a rock at other times. Makes em sound human don't it?