Kicked Out

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by greenacres, May 2, 2005.

  1. greenacres

    greenacres Well-Known Member

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    Hoop houses made out of cattle panels and tarps would be great for storage or shelter. I second the dog idea. Hit garage sales for cheap kitchen stuff, blankets, towels, sheets, tools, etc. Good luck. Enjoy yourself.
     
  2. baysidebunny

    baysidebunny Well-Known Member

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    Hi Danny.

    I really feel for you. Having a mom tell you to leave has got to be a real blow. Hopefully the transition will go smoothly. I wish you were in my area. I have a pull-camper sitting in the yard not being used right now that I would be glad to lend you for as long as you needed it. With that thought, so comes this one...

    I notice that you happen to have a computer. Have you thought about checking the Freecycle in your area and putting in a request for items that you'll be needing? Local community members in that program are usually very giving and may be of some help to you. Recently someone here requested an RV for a family that was homeless, if nobody wanted there's anymore and a woman happened to answer in less than a week saying that she had one sitting in her driveway that she will never get around to fixing up like she planned. That family was very happy. I have seen cars given away the same way. No request is ever too big or too small.

    Everyone has really good good advice here...
    Now if they could only point you to the location of that money tree that you'll need in order to buy some of those items that they tell you to buy, you'll have it made, won't you?! :p

    Good Luck Danny. and please keep us posted.
     

  3. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    Get a small, cheap, old pull-behind camping caravan. This should give you a gas stove, a gas (and electric) refrigerator, and 12-volt lights. Also a water tank and small wash-up sink. Beds and furniture, all in one package. It also gives you lockable doors, which is important.

    Use this to camp on your land. You have water - you can if necessary filter it, and boil what you need for drinking and cleaning teeth. You can sterilise water during summer by putting it in clear plastic (say Cola) bottles, then lying them on some black plastic in the sunlight during the day. It doesn't boil, but it does get hot enough to sterilise it.

    You CAN get clean with a gallon of water - even with one of those cheap shrunken little US gallons. Sponge bath, but use a teatowel or hand-towel as a washer so you can reach everywhere. Our man Cabin Fever recommends a one-gallon garden spray - pump for pressure - to give yourself a shower.

    Living in a garage has a long history. You're likely to need a garage or shed. Build one - at least two bays. Allow for it to become a workshop as well - now while you build more; and in the future as well. This gives you secure storage as well as living space. Put a drained concrete pad for washing on (clothes or people), and wall-off a composting toilet area. Have a roofed area (can you have car-ports there?) outside so you can run a generator outside if necessary even in bad weather.

    Now put your caravan in the garage. Having two roofs over you should insulate you from most weather, even during the worst of winter. Also gives you undercover area away from rain as well. You can get out of your limited living space but still stay dry - have (a) living-room outside your caravan. You can dry laundry while the rain is pouring down.

    Think about where to build before building. If there's any chance of connecting electricity, build (even just your garage) so that can be done easily and cheaply.
     
  4. Tucker

    Tucker Well-Known Member

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    Hello Danny ,, Sorry to hear about your problems ,, I see that others more experienced than me have given you great advice ,, I'm wondering since you are working a fulltime job ,, is / are there company's that makes shed 'building's that they deliver and set up near you ,, ??

    When we brought our property we went to a local company and bought a 12 x 20 ft building ,, has 2 windows and double doors ,, cost was $2,200.00 ,, but they financed it for $47 a month ,, wasn't a high interest rate either ,, (We paid it off the next year with our income taxes) ,, this building has shingled roof 2x4 construction , plywood floors ,, they bring and set up on cinderblocks ,, ours is not finished inside ,, you would have to insulate and cover the inside walls before next winter ,, but that wouldn't cost much for you to do yourself ,,,

    That would give you plenty of dry secure room ,, easier to heat and keep dry than a tent ,, and you could build leanto sheds onto the building during the summer to store wood for winter ,,

    Hub swears I made him buy the building ,, Just to make him build a 8 x 20 $700 chicken house on one side :haha: ,,, :D

    a 12 x 20 is real roomy and if you built a shed on one side you could install a composting toilet and a shower as others have suggested ,, and a dog for companionship would guard the building while you're at work ,,
     
  5. Natureschild

    Natureschild Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to hear about your mom, and your situation. I must admit, sometimes I wish my mom would kick me out of her basement,lol.

    Definately get a dog! I would get two. A sheppard/lab cross and a jack russel. Both are great loyal and fierce companions with brains. The jack russel will be great for rats and mice and other small predators. The labx will take care of the bigger stuff.

    Good-luck! :)
     
  6. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    Danny...you haven't made clear about who owns the land where you intend to camp? You have a tent & some cooking gear, & other camping stuff. Who's going to guard it while you're at work? Are you going to put it all in the trunk of your car while you're at work & then set up everyday? Do you have a car or a vehicle?
     
  7. Natureschild

    Natureschild Well-Known Member

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    I forgot to mention-
    get a good first-aid kit. Make sure you have gauze, hydrogen peroxide(at least 2 bottles), those little bandages that you use to pull a wound together in lieu of stitches, vetrap is handy(horse product), and other stuff, but the brain isnt working right now, I must be hungry.
     
  8. BamaSuzy

    BamaSuzy Well-Known Member

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    I just think getting out on your land will help YOUR mental outlook! I know it has been hard dealing with your mama!

    I lived for a VERY VERY VERY HOT Alabama summer in a pop up camper while building a house (it was borrowed)....

    the main thing is just have some way to stay out of the rain and cold....you should have a few months to get that together. it doesn't have to be fancy and can be a little building, old school bus, or any of these great suggestions on this thread. please keep us posted on how you are doing!
     
  9. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Here's an interesting site. http://www.littlecountryvillage.com/frugal-articles.shtml

    Somewhere on here it tells how to build a cabin for $2000: I regret that I have to leave in a few minutes so I cannot find it for you: in fact I haven't even seen it myself, yet!

    A bit about going to school full time: I used to tape the lectures and listen to them for a second time while I drove. The commute time was my study time. You MIGHT be able to listen while you build, also.

    Good luck!
     
  10. TabletopHomestead

    TabletopHomestead Well-Known Member

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    Danny, some things are Providential. I won't repeat the good advice that's already been given, except for a couple of points. Don't get hung up on the idea that getting clean requires a shower. Hot water in a bucket poured over your head works fine. We've been doing it for years. Also, it's my belief that it's a mistake to trade the slavery of debt (even a small one) for a bit of comfort especially at your age. You have an awsome opportunity to build a life of freedom and self-sufficiency. You'll make mistakes and you'll learn from them. Remember, there's more than one way to skin a cat.
     
  11. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Ya know, my first impression is this, why not enlist for four years. I think it would do you a heap of good. While you're in the service, you'll have time to save and perhaps learn a decent profession where you could pay for a $500 apartment.
     
  12. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    If you chose to enter the military services do not choose the 4 year enlistment, choose the shortest one available - you may learn to dislike haveing some dog breathed idiot screaming at you every morning at 5:01.....
     
  13. Corgitails

    Corgitails Well-Known Member

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  14. Wolf mom

    Wolf mom Well-Known Member

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    What about friends, relatives? Is there anyone who you could share an apartment, or board with?? I see lots of adds for "roommates wanted" that usually includes 1/2 utilities and all the living space or just "room for rent" that would be a lot cheaper. I once rented a one bdrm trailer, called a 'park model' in the back of some guy's house. My shower and toilet were across the lawn in another building. A much easier way to live and save money to get what you want.

    When all your time is spent living on a survival level, there's not much time to be able to find what you need while working - especially with gas prices the way they are. The above options gives you the ability to have electricity, water, phone, etc that are important to you. Propane is also costly these days, and just went up with summer demand.

    If the above is not an option - some people use sun showers. A bucket higher than you are tall, attached to a tree, etc. Water in it warmed by the sun or hot water heated & poured in it. The trick is an on, off faucet attached to the bottom of the bucket!

    Whatever you decide - Good Luck
     
  15. twstanley

    twstanley Well-Known Member

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    You can shower with something as simple as a 5 gallon water can set on something above your head...unscrew the small opening, get wet, close it, soap and shampoo up, unscrew opening and rinse. We did this for several months in Iraq until we built a gravity fed system. If you want different temperature water, set the container ( spray painted black ) in the sun for different periods of time, i.e. cold in the morning, hot late afternoon/evening.

    If you don't have any structure to set the water can on, hang it from a tree with a rope. You can fill it from your creek by digging a hole in the creek bed to make a deep enough spot to lay the can in on its side or use a siphon mechanism to draw water from an uphill spot to the can which is downhill from it via a hose of some sort.

    You can do laundry in a shallow tub with bit of detergent and a few gallons of water, it really isn't that hard and you can get your clothes clean with not to much work. We did that for months as well.

    One thing you learn living rough is save EVERYTHING. Cardboard boxes can become shelves, etc. You can find a use for everything. Empty peanut butter jars become air/watertight storage containers, etc. Use your imagination!

    Your first goal should be living as frugally as possible while you build yourself a winter ready shelter. The ideas of either buying a ready made building kit or a used small camper are great ones. One advantage of a ready made building is you could finish a smaller interior space and insulate it as heavily as you want easily.

    Good luck, let us know how it goes.
     
  16. roughingit

    roughingit knitwit

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    I second most of the advice given here. If you can find a cheap or free used camper, it should make your life much easier since you are not familiar with camping and it will be more secure if that is an issue. In the meantime, when you set up your tent, pitch a tarp to serve as a porch and cooking area. Depending on the weather it will keep the rain off your head or give you somewhere cool and shady to sit. If you have any doubts at all about the security of your site, keep your valuables locked up! A tiny storage unit doesn't cost too much, or maybe you might even know someone with a bit of space you can use in their garage or such.

    One word of advice having done the camper thing before, while you are not hooked up to anything, don't use the toilet! Especially if you have no way to move it back and forth to a dump site. For gray water, let the tanks get full, then make a pipe draining *away* from your camper, but hopeful not towards your water source. If you use biodegradable soap and are light on the greasy cooking, the ground will filter it.

    That'll help keep ya comfy while you build something more permanent at least, or if you are not very familiar with building things, you can build around the camper itself and work on other things.
     
  17. COUNTRY WISHES

    COUNTRY WISHES Well-Known Member

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    I was thinking something along the lines of a pop up would be good. Is it legal for you to camp on your land? Some towns may have an ordinence against this, if so keep your camp out of sight.

    Try your camp set up for a few months and see how it goes if it isn't working for you or you feel you won't be able to stay warm this winter than you could look into getting a roomate to share an apartment with or renting just a room to stay in. Local colleges and newspapers usually post these notices or you could put one out yourself.

    I would let someone other than your mother know that you are roughing out there. Maybe someone at your job. This way if you don't show one day they will know where to look for you. Could be a lifesaver if you are ill or injured.
     
  18. MMyers1

    MMyers1 Well-Known Member

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    You can actually get a portable black water tank that allows you to use the toilet, then take the black water to a dump site and drain it appropriately. We purchased a large portable black water tank at a RV shop for <$100.00. It works like a champ!!
     
  19. Shepherd

    Shepherd Well-Known Member

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    Just out of curiosity, how are you getting online?

    There are all kinds of things you could do and this could be a real fun time of your life. There are people all over with things they'd like to get rid of. Some have old tents they no longer use, or those old fold-up campers (hard top and bottom with canvas sides) that they'd be glad to just get rid of, or sell for very little money. Goodwill stores have tons of things you could utilize from tents to cookware... but watch the prices. Check garage sales for things too. Meanwhile, you can do a lot with tarps!

    Your main consideration needs to be safety. Be very cautious where you start a fire and never leave it unattended. Make sure it's in a somewhat protected area from the wind and nothing close by that can catch fire (cut down dry grass, weeds, etc. around your fire pit). Keep a large bucket (or two) of water right by the fire. If you have landfills/dumps anywhere near, go rummaging. You'll often find broken down grills; you could take the grill tops so you could make your own cooking pit with them. Lay your grill tops on top of larger rocks you can find on the property and place around your pit.

    Respect nature and your surroundings and it will take care of you. Never kill animals if you don't plan to use them for food - unless of course, your life's in danger. Get to know your neighbors... one day your life might depend on them. We live in the woods - I feel safer here than in the city... altho I was apprehensive at first. Amazing how much you can learn by just sitting silently, observing the animals and nature in general.

    Let us know how you're doing...
     
  20. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    I know this is hard for you, do you believe that everything happens for a reason? Maybe it is time for you to be at your place?

    If you use baking soda to clean your hair it takes less water to rinse out than shampoo, also is easier on the water table if you are bathing outside. Vinegar rinse, also you can use vinegar in water to sponge bathe with and it leaves you fresh. If your hair isn't really long you can do a whole groom with these things with about a gallon or two of water.

    A plastic watering can from WalMart makes a great temporary shower! Once it warms up, those camping ones are nice too.

    Good luck! Hope you get comfortable soon, and that your mom is able to have a relationship with you in some fashion.

    hollym