keeping seeds warm

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by hollym, May 5, 2005.

  1. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone know how to heat up soil without a propagation mat? I know that you can put things on top of the fridge, but I don't have room for all that much up there. I've been moving them around to take advantage of sunny windows, but it's all still going way too slowly! I do have a shop light with the bulbs, will this heat up things without drying out my soil too much?

    hollym
     
  2. whiterock

    whiterock Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I had a kennel in the house for the new pup and set the flats on the top. The air circulation around the flat above the floor warmed some.
    I watered with warm water,
    You could place them on a table with an electric heater underneath with the heater on low.
    An old electric blanket?
    Put the flats outside in the car?
    what do you think?
    Ed
     

  3. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm, I do have chicks in the house, maybe they need to earn their starter? I don't have an electric blanket, and I thought a heating pad might be too hot? But maybe Goodwill has a blanket? that is a good idea. I will try the warm water and moving them on top of the chicks and see what happens, thank you!

    Too hot in the car, unfortunately we are already approaching that time of year when we fry, I'm near San Antonio. Not looking forward to it!

    hollym
     
  4. tikaani

    tikaani Well-Known Member

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    I use a electric heating pad wrapped in a towell. usually I can cut the germination time in half this way. I try to keep a eye on it because I'm not really sure of the safety of this.
     
  5. Mr. Dot

    Mr. Dot Well-Known Member

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    Howdy
    I too use a heating pad but additionally I place my flats on top of the hanging shop lights to gain some bottom heat while germination is going on. Usually, until something pops through the soil, I enclose the flat in a clear garbage bag to keep the moisture level up. Bag comes off when things start shaking.
     
  6. mamagoose

    mamagoose Well-Known Member

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    I put my trays of pepper seeds in the oven with the pilot light on. It's just over 80 degrees (with a large note taped to the front not to turn on the oven). This is the only way I have been able to germinate my pepper seed in the house ahead of warmer temps. The plant are in the coldframe now.
     
  7. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    I wondered about a heating pad, I thought that might be too hot. Sounds like it works for ya'll.

    I'm determined to get the hang of this this year, I've always bought plants for almost everything, but that's not really the way to go to learn further self sufficiency. I'm learning some heirloom varieties of tomatoes, too, will see how that goes.

    thanks for all the suggestions, I'm going to implement the chickens and the heating pad at night when I'm there to watch it.

    hollym
     
  8. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    Wanted to tell ya'll, I planted more seeds this weekend and stuck them on top of the chick brooders? Well, the lima & green bush beans I planted on Saturday are already popping up!

    hollym
     
  9. CurtisWilliams

    CurtisWilliams Well-Known Member

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    Here's a thought about using heating pads, lights or other heat sources that may get too hot. Run the elecrticity through a rheostat (dimmer switch). At Wallyworld or any hardware store buy a knob type dimmer switch (the sliding kind works, but I prefer the knob type), an electrical outlet, a double wide electrical box, and a faceplate. Scrounge an old lamp cord. Run the wiring in so that the dimmer switch will control the outlet (the directions with the switch are pretty good) and mount the switch and outlet side by side in the box. You now have an extension cord with the ability to reduce the current going through it by any amount desired. Plug your heat source into the outlet and with a little trial and error you can get the exact amount of heat needed. I use this setup on my brooder lamps, and instead of raising the lights to let more heat escape, with a twist of the knob I use less electricity. This should work with any radiant heat source. DO NOT USE IT WITH ANYTHING THAT HAS A MOTOR, FAN OR ON SENSITIVE ELECTRONICS! I don't know if it will work with flourescents.
     
  10. Cindy in NY

    Cindy in NY Well-Known Member Supporter

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    DH made a heating box for me out of an old crate. The crate is about 10" tall and is long enough and wide enough that I can set three seedling trays on top of it. He wired two light sockets into the bottom and we use 25 watt bulbs in them. I usually have tomato seedlings up in about 2 days using this!
     
  11. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    These are both very cool ideas, copy/pasting to my very cool idea file!

    hollym
     
  12. kemrefarms

    kemrefarms Head Weed Wrangler

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    Every year my flats are started on heating pads from kmart for 17.00 for king size and 7.00 for the shop lights. I place plastic over the heating pads for the possible water problem and always have them cranked on high. This year the only thing I did different was I used to turn off the lights at night but this year left them on round the clock and the plants are so mucn more beautiful and full and healthy. before i transplant them they spend a few days in a hoop tunnel to adjust.