Keeping bugs off greens

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by dot, Aug 25, 2005.

  1. dot

    dot Well-Known Member

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    My mother was trying to tell me about something to keep the bugs off greens while they are growing. Thurin????. That was all she could remember. Does anyone know what she could have been talking about?
     
  2. piddler

    piddler Member

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    Hi,
    I have heard of it before but don't really know what it is.
    A guy that lives just down the road from me swears by wood ashes! He sprinkles them lightly over the greens, and other plants and it keeps the bugs off. I had never heard of this before until he was telling me about it. I have never tried it before, so I can't tell you on a first hand basis whether it really works or not, but I guess it's worth a try. Good Luck!

    piddler
     

  3. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

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    could she have meant this: Permethrin Dust is often used in pet kennels, vegetable and flower gardens and is an excellent alternative to using Sevin Dust. Permethrin Dust is safer than other dusts, when using on pets or in vegetable gardens.

    think i found it. how bout this one?

    Dipel Dust
    Dipel Dust contains B.T. (Bacillus Thuringiensis), a biological insecticide control for Tomato Hornworm, Looper, Webworm, Armyworm, Cutworm, Leaf Roller, and other caterpillars on vegetables, fruits, ornamentals, flowers, and lawns. Dipel dust works as a stomach poison. After biting a treated portion of the leaf, caterpillars stop feeding within a few hours. Death then follows in a few days.

    Apply when caterpillars first appear or the sight of their damage. Complete coverage at 7 to 10 days intervals due to insect egg hatch. May be applied up to time of harvest.
    Each container of Dipel Dust is only $4.50, plus S&H.
     
  4. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Rotenone dust is another one.
     
  5. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

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    Here's a surprise one I only learned about recently. I've tried it and it works.

    Commercial cleaners use a product in public toilets to make things smell nice. It comes in blocks which evaporate over time. I don't have a name for it, but you could hunt up something similar from a supplier to commercial cleaners.

    A friend of mine bought a large bucket of this stuff, and gave me some of the blocks. I poked a few holes in the bottom of a plastic butter tub, and a couple of holes at the top of it, through which I threaded some string. Put the blocks into the container, put the lid on, and hung it in a convenient place near my vege patch. Nothing ate my precious lettuce! My friend hangs it in her mango tree to keep fruit fly away. It works. Bugs don't like strong smells. We humans don't notice the smell when we're outside. You need to replace the blocks from time to time. Don't poke holes in the sides or top of the container, or the stuff will get wet when it rains and evaporate quickly.

    You could plant strong-smelling herbs amongst your veges - lavender, basil etc. Also plants like pyrethrum and tansy help to keep bugs away.
     
  6. dot

    dot Well-Known Member

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    Sisterpine, I think you are right (Thuringiensis). Thanks everyone!