Katahdin Fencing Question

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by BobDFL, Sep 1, 2006.

  1. BobDFL

    BobDFL The High-Tech Ludite Supporter

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    Central FL. Zone 9b
    I'm in the process of putting up perimeter fence on my property, and I'm wondering:

    What post spacing should I use for a Field Fence ( Woven ) wire fence?

    My neighbors is anywhere from 11-13 feet, but they only have a couple of Nigerian dwarf goats and horses. The cattle ranch behind me ( a 600 arce beef cattle ranch ) has their posts spaced 16 ft apart on their barbed wire fence. I'm planning on having only 3 ewes ( I have a ram I can have them visit when the time comes ), 3 larger meat goat does,
    and a couple of Dexter Cows.

    These will be fenced off 1 acre pastures for rotation purposes.

    I was thinking of every 8 ft. with 6.5 ft 3.5 in. line posts, but if I can get away with farther spacing that could save me a ton of money on fence posts.

    Thanks,

    Bob D. in FL.
     
  2. 6e

    6e Farm lovin wife Supporter

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    When we put up field fence around our dry lot we made the mistake of making the posts 12'. Big mistake! Of course, we had goats in with the sheep and they stand up on the fence, and now the fence is in need of being restretched. I would say 8 - 10' centers. You won't have the trouble with them standing on the fence. I would say with the price of field fence, the t-posts are the cheapest part of the deal.
     

  3. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    I'd go the 8-10 route as well. Dolly would always find posts that were farther apart and push her way underneath the field fencing. With them just a little closer, it was easier to keep her in.
     
  4. catahoula

    catahoula Well-Known Member

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    You might want to consider electric fencing, it's pretty easy to install, and you don't have to worry about critters leaning against it. That being said, I did have to go with welded wire fencing to keep my ram away from the ewes. For the electric fencing I have a post every twenty feet, for the welded wire I have a post every ten feet; I ran a hot wire on the inside to keep him from leaning on the fencing.
     
  5. BobDFL

    BobDFL The High-Tech Ludite Supporter

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    Thanks y'all I went with 10' spacing and I'll be putting hotwire at 6" and then 2 more higher up on the inside of the fence to keep them off it.

    My other concern was with DOGS. It seems we have some neighbors who let their dogs run free, and there have been some issues with other neighbors. The other issue is with the 600 acre cattle ranch behind me. My dog ( a 100 # Golden Retriever ) thinks all that he can see is his and they will shoot any dog on site on their property ( I don't blame them they have lost calves a number of times to packs of pitbulls ).

    Again thanks everyone who responded it really helped.

    Bob D. in FL.
     
  6. jlo

    jlo Active Member

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    We live in a rural area, but it's growing fast and have our own dogs (which run through our fenced fields) and the neighbors all have dogs which run loose regularly plus during hunting season the hounds are running around loose everywhere. We also have coyotes here, although they haven't given us any trouble. We also live right on and have several fields right on a 55 mph road.

    We decided on using a donkey because they are less likely to have people aggression than guard dogs and easier to fence in. I don't want our guard dog jumping the fence to bite the neighbor/neighbor's kid/etc. or getting hit by a car. At first she seemed so pleasant we were a little concerned she wouldn't do her job, but now we've seen her nearly trample the neighbor's sheltie and chase our own dogs around the field until we saved them. She's worked out great and is very friendly and easy to care for. Our dogs have learned to stay on the far side of the field from her.