just let it all go

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by celticfalcon, Apr 3, 2005.

  1. celticfalcon

    celticfalcon tom

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    as the economy gets worse and prices skyrocket, wouldnt you just love to get rid of everything and just live on your own? we would love to just use no electricity cut our own wood(which i do) grow our own food and hunt and fish. i work for the auto industry and would love to just get back to the basis's and become a handyman. we are young enough to do this but are stll a little scared to do so.
    any comments
    thanx
    tom
     
  2. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Let me know when you get rid of everything...I could use some of it.

    It's easy to live without electricity....flip the breaker for a week or so and see if you like it.
     

  3. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    that's definitely a good start. after you get the hang of that, try carrying water to cook, bathe and wash with. 2 days oughtta do it.
     
  4. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    It might be a romantic thought to 'let it all go', but in reality you proabably are just trading some things in one lifestyle for other things or attitudes in another lifestyle. You might be trading some easier life for some terrific hardship you might not realize by getting rid of a steady job.
    Depends on where you move, also. That still subjects you to regulations and taxes, so 'escaping' isn't a real way of putting it.
    Remember also it fhe 'economy gets worse' it has even worse effects on anyone not in the 'mainstream' of the economy of a larger center where better payiing jobs may exist.
    And...as if you say you are 'get rid of everything', that compromises what you will start with on a 'homestead' because if you have to live somewhere and still look after your needs, you'll NEED something than just handy skills or thinking of the romantic notion of 'living off the land'.
    Good example is cutting your own wood may be subject to some land use regulations as well as fuel you need to buy for running a chansaw, even if you got the chaisaw for next to nothing. How are you going to bring the wood up to your place of burning it for heat? You need vehicles, or horses...both of which have their 'costs'. Growing your own food is fine and can be economical, but what if you get hammered by the first year with damaging hail or storms that could wipe out your supply for the winter storage...not to say possible flooding if you end up on land subject to that. Hunting and fishing? again...what is the wild stock availaibe on the land you wish to pursue? Regulations also persist on that front. Foraging might be supplemental for such things as wild fruits or berries, even fungus or other edibles if you become familiar with them on your land.
    Good luck. The only difference between doing it and not doing it is doing it. Many try and fail, and many try and succeed to suit their sensibilities.
     
  5. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    On a more cheerfull note, the more you do yourself the less money you need to spend and the more money you can salt away for a lifestyle change.

    So, start now and see if it suits you. If you have a house, then garden. IF you like to hunt and fish, then now look into whether or not it would be cost effective. (In my area a fishing license will cost $50, and you get mostly crappie. We like crappie, but a small child can eat 6 of them). Cook from scratch. If you are both too tired at the end of the day, invest in a crock pot and start supper before you leave for work.

    To start with, how about you find out just how little you can live on? That will tell you how much income you will need if you become a handyman. Put the rest into savings. Then, when you get a job with a successfull handyman (to learn the ropes and customer relations), you will know how much you can work for bare minimum.

    Homesteaders have just as much stuff as city folk, we just have it in the form of canning jars, tools, fishing poles, and so forth. I have been able to keep costs low by just buying what I need one project at a time, but buy this stuff I must if I am going to keep things running smoothly.

    For instance, you cannot keep chickens in this climate without at least a shelter. My chicken shelter is only 4' long and 4' tall, and the chickens body heat can heat it somewhat. I use a heat bulb and containers of hot water when it is really cold out. It gets -5 to -10 every winter.

    I work just as hard now as I did when I was a nurse, but I don't really notice because the stress is MUCH less! Really lovely! ;)
     
  6. joe1968m

    joe1968m social invalid

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    i really love this website
    helps keep my dream alive
    thank you all for the information and motivation
    finally found a place i belong
    :D
     
  7. DAVID In Wisconsin

    DAVID In Wisconsin Well-Known Member

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    I did your dream a few years back. I chucked it all and built a 12 x 20 cabin with no electricity or running water. I found it peaceful and with planning, easy. I absolutely loved it. I'd do it again in a minute. But, now I have others to think about. That lifestyle isn't for everyone so I wouldn't drag others into it kicking and screaming. Some people can and some can't. I am one who can. It was great! If you're of like minds, do it fast! You might wonder why you ever waited. You will be amazed at how cheaply you can live.
     
  8. thequeensblessing

    thequeensblessing Well-Known Member

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    My personal belief is that we should all know how to live that way, even if we never HAVE to. Try it out for size, and learn how to things for yourself without relying on others any more then you have to. Use wood to heat and cook, use candles and oil lamps, make homemade soaps and have a garden and some livestock for meat, eggs, and milk. Get rid of the phone, power and city water.
    Get a well or find a spring.
    I chose to live with the "luxuries" of life (electricity, phone, t.v., etc), however we have lived off the land before, and I know I could do it, if I had to. We still raise 90% of our own food, make soap, cheese, butter, yogurt, candles, rugs, blankets, quilts, etc.
    Everyone should find out for themselves if it's workable for them. Some will love it, others will not. To each his own, but as I said, the knowing how is the important part.
     
  9. celticfalcon

    celticfalcon tom

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    not saying that i would this minute/2-3 years. yes i have lived w/o eletricity for 1-1/2 weeks. as far as wood, i have ample supply. where i cut wood with my closest friend we have enough. we havent even went behind my house yet.
    not that i want to eleminate ourself from everything, just to be self sustaining but have the convenience of the other.
    thanks for all the input and responses.
    tom
     
  10. Hoop

    Hoop Well-Known Member

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    I'm not going to sugar coat it. I happen to think anyone is close to insane if they think for a second they can "live off the land".

    Living off the land doesn't pay for health insurance. Without health insurance, one is putting there financial security in complete jeopardy. One could easily be thrown out of their house into a snowbank, should they need a hospital stay.

    Even those eligible for Medicare need a supplemental policy.

    Its a gamble that we all know is out there.


    How do you plan to pay for health insurance?
     
  11. goatlady

    goatlady Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hoop, guess I' happily insane then as are most of the folks I know in my area. Haven't had health insurance coverage of any kind for over 30 years, not even when I had 4 children at home. couldn't afford it then, certainly cannot afford $100 a month now for Medicare supplemental insurance. Guess we just stumble along in our good health, taking care of ourselves, not acting foolishly in our daily lives, and not depending on the PTB to take care of us. Different outlooks for different folks.
     
  12. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

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    You all brought up some very good points for the new "want to homestead" person to consider. What seems romantic and exciting is in reality a great deal of hard work. We haul our own water (well did not work out) for the past 6 years and see no break in this pattern to come in the near future. we heat only with wood which we harvest and prepare our selves and that will not change either. We are totally off the grid and just now getting to put up some solar panels after this 6 year period of using gasoline (really expensive) for charging our battery bank. Would I trade for a life in the city with all conveniences---not a chance. But that is me - a middle aged eccentric gal who lives atop a mountain in the middle of nowhere montana. This life style is not for the weak willed for sure!
     
  13. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Formerly LisainN.Idaho Supporter

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    We live totally off the grid and it may be a bit harder, but not much. We have solar power and an inverter, so we use regular AC power like anyone else. We have a well, and a washer and dryer (super efficient) ..no beating clothes on rocks.
    We raise a great deal of our own food, and my husband runs his business from our home (telecommutes). Any trade-offs are well worth it to us. We do have health insurance, we buy privately and carry a huge deductible in case of catastrophic illness.
    We have hauled water in the past, and it isn't fun. Make water a priority in your land purchase. It can take a bit of time to iron everything out, but you're young..life's an adventure.
     
  14. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    I lived off of the grid for eight years in the mountains of Montana. I loved it, but it was hard work, and sometimes it was COLD!, and things went wrong and we had to deal with them.

    But...I loved it, I'd do it again in a heartbeat, just like someone else above, not willing to drag my two 'city kids' off into the woods. Although I dragged my first two 'city kids' off into the woods, come to think of it, and they say now that it was very character building!

    I think that if you are on your own, that it would be less complicated?

    We hauled water and cut wood. We built sheds out of sawmill ends, gardened, the whole nine yards. In many ways it was the happiest time of my life, I was living my dream. Someday I will do it again, maybe a modified version of it, though, since I will be older!

    hollym
     
  15. jerzeygurl

    jerzeygurl woolgathering

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    who can afford health insurance at 700 a month, 8400 a year will go a long way to pay for ours out of pocket.

    but back to orrigianl post, yes thats the plan man a step at a time.
     
  16. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Ok, not going to sugar coat it, what happens when that insurance you worked your hind end off to pay for then says that some medicine or test is worth $6 when the hospital wants $500 for it. Or they say that operation is worth $20000 and they will cover $15000 when the hospital/doctors want $150000. Or they wont cover a certain procedure at all because in their view its "experimental" though its been done for years. Woopsie....

    There are no guarentees in life. You can spend your life chasing "SAFETY" and "guarentees" or you can do what you really want to do. Most of human history was live or die. Thats it, no illusions of keeping the grim reaper at bay.
     
  17. Hoop

    Hoop Well-Known Member

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    You do bring up a valid point. One never does know how good their health insurance is on coverage until one needs to use it.

    I must be the only person on this forum that has had friends/acquaintances suffer severe economic hardship, bankruptcy, and stress related health problems related to insurmountable debt----generated from lack of health insurance.

    My opinion is unchanged. I still believe its near insanity to even think one can live off the land.

    Certainly, one can live a lifestyle that STRIVES to be self sufficient. Thats a far cry from living off the land.
     
  18. thequeensblessing

    thequeensblessing Well-Known Member

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    I am one of those folks who had no health insurance when I was younger, and thought I was going to live forever in perfect health. :rolleyes:

    Then at the tender age of 34 I was diagnosed with breast cancer. Talk about a rude awakening. Major illness, no insurance. I had my treatment, and then we proceeded to sell everything we owned to pay off the medical bills. We then started over.

    10 years later, we have a 15 acre homestead and a brand new home. We have health insurance through DH's employer, however, with the monthly premiums, the co-pays, and the deductibles, we could probably just salt the money away and come out close to even if we ever had another major illness strike.

    I'm not so sure medical insurance is everything it's said to be.
     
  19. terriv

    terriv Well-Known Member

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    Please don't do that deliberately. Alienate, perhaps; eliminate, bad idea. :)

    We are self employed and haven't had health insurance for almost 7 years. I admit it's a little scary, not bankruptcy ...but the possibility of having no choice but to die. We can't afford the $700-800 a month. If I'm not mistaken as many as 40% of people are in our situation.
     
  20. wildwanderer

    wildwanderer Momma, Goatherder etc....

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    It can be done and yes me and the family are probably insane. We carry and heat our water. We have electricity, but we are moving quickly to solar. Myself and my dad work outside of the home, right now I am the only one who has health insurance and it is definitely not something I have always had. If it cost money I would not have it. I have worked in hospitals since I was 15 and most of what is done there well I would not choose to have done to myself. We try to use herbal remedies and stay healthy with our food choices. The number one and two killers of americans is smoking and obesity. These are choices not health problems.
    Before walmart existed people went somewhere else, before the doctor existed people lived other ways. I believe you can do whatever you want to do. You may die doing it but will you be happy when you pass?
    I have seen so much in my limited years, but I know I would rather keel over in the garden or in my backwoods then die at a slot machine, or at work I hated.
    So yes as gas prices go up I wonder how I will survive on a VISTA stipend, but I like what I do so there will be a way. Every spare cent goes on to make sure that if I don't enjoy it I will have a choice to walk away. I know its possible, because its a reality for many of my friends. Take care -- Thea