Just got info. on applying for our bldg permit - zoiks!!

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by heather, Apr 7, 2005.

  1. heather

    heather Well-Known Member

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    There are pages & pages & lists & lists of what they want from us before they'll approve our permit to build

    I told dh if I didn't want it so bad, I'd just give up & go buy elsewhere

    I ONLY want to hear from those of you who have survived this process!!! :p

    No, I'm kidding - really, I'm just ranting - I'm so tired of all the hoops we've already had to jump through & now this :bash:
     
  2. Hoop

    Hoop Well-Known Member

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    Congratulations on starting the building process.

    The building permits are nothing more than civilization saying....welcome aboard. The permit process may seem overwhelming but millions have done it before you, and millions more will after you. As the world gets more civilized, the days of building shacks and running effluent into the stream are over.

    If you want to live like Jed Clampette in a rickety shack, you probably should go elsewhere.

    If however, you want to build something that will outlast you, stay and build in a zoned area.
    There will be mandatory setbacks from the property boundary (usually 10'), and quite likely setbacks from any water (lake, river, ocean) the property borders. There will be stringent requirements on septic systems, and it will likely have to be installed by a licensed plumber.
    It is NOT overwhelming.


    You'll be glad to know that all the hard work you put into your house will be an investment that will remain solid. You won't have to worry about some hillbilly moving next door to you, hauling in a grubby $500 trailer, 16 junk cars, and 14 nonstop barking dogs. Nobody will move into your neighborhood and commence to devalue the property by means of turning it into a rural junkyard (slum).

    Think of it this way. The building permits prevent Jed Clampette from building a shack in a civilized area.
     

  3. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    I'd far prefer Jed Clampett than some metrosexual milktoast neighbor demanding to know if my fenceposts had been grown organically. And the houses built in the country by country folks will far outlast the blight of future slums of slapped-together balsa-wood row houses, apartments, and condominia spreading out from the cities.

    The building permits are little more than than the bacterial way of spreading the infection beyond the open pustule.


    On the other hand, a true country shack is disposable anyway.
     
  4. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    There really and truly is a light at the end of the tunnel. Once you have the survey, site plan, storm water runoff map, architect's plans, and structural engineer's report (I'm sure I'm forgetting stuff that was on my own laundry list of stuff I had to have) - they do really and truly give you a permit.

    I've been there and survived. I'm actually there again for a cidery building. This is totally doable.

    - I have to admit, though, if I wasn't running the cidery on property and didn't have to worry about the ocassional inspector coming by I would probably have just put up a "temporary" barn (on skids so it was theoretically moveable) and not said anything.
     
  5. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    Dear Heather,

    You know, I deal with Building Codes every day – in Canada and United States; they can seem overly complicated.

    Just keep at it! Don't give up; the rules and requirements are NOT unlimited: they are limited – you can do it. Then it will be to a certain standard.

    Or, go somewhere where there are no requirements, other than, say electrical – always do electrical, gas, and wood stoves and flues to CODE – 100% – no fouling around – make sure heating and electrical are safe for you and yours.

    Now that I think about it, structural engineering is rather important too.

    Good luck,

    Alex
     
  6. antiquestuff

    antiquestuff Well-Known Member

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    If it doesn't fall down when you walk in it (or, conversly, leave it...) it's well engineered. ;) :D LOL

    My opinion on permits-they shouldn't be required of you when you're building your own house-intrusions, etc. that are not needed. I personally would go where there are no permits-though that's getting harder now it seems...
     
  7. heather

    heather Well-Known Member

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    THANK YOU everyone -
    I feel a bit better this morning - THANKS to your comments & the fact that I have a guy coming over this morning who's doing our radiant floor heat -
    He has been the general on schools, hospitals, homes, you name it & he offered to come over & help me get moving; get things sorted out

    Whoosh!

    He's coming soon, so I better get my paperwork out -

    THANKS everyone! I'll keep you posted!

    PS - I was successful in getting my driveway permit! hee! hee!