Just bought my welder

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Rob30, Nov 27, 2006.

  1. Rob30

    Rob30 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well Christmas came early for me. Just found a really good deal on a Lincoln 225 welder. I have to wire it into my garage tomorrow.
    I am using 10/2 wire. Thats what the book calls for. There is a wide prong and a narrow prong on the plug. Which gets the black and which gets the white wire?
     
  2. retire2$

    retire2$ Well-Known Member

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    If the welder is 220 volt is doesn't matter since they are both hot. Check and see the amperage of the welder. The wire you plan to use is only rated for 30 amps.
     

  3. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    A 220 welding circuit is nothing more than a pair of 110's using the same neutral (return wire, although nothing returns, but the pathway must be established for it to work). Either side is not a problem.
     
  4. Cosmic

    Cosmic Well-Known Member

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    If I read your question right the welder is actually 110 VAC. You say the supply cable is only 10/2. I take it the plug only has two prongs on the plug (with maybe a ground ????)

    In that case the wider prong on the plug is neutral (White wire / Silver screw on the receptacle) and narrow is the hot (Black wire / Gold screw on the receptacle)

    If it really is 220 VAC you are using the wrong wire.
     
  5. Rob30

    Rob30 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Th instructions state to use a minimum of #10 wire to install with a 60 amp super lag type fuse.
    What size do you suggest? I have 15 ft of 10/2. I also have about 10 ft of what looks like 8/3.
     
  6. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    My 220v table saw has a male plug similar to what he described.

    Personally I'd have a certified electrician do the wiring, particularly into the fuse box.
     
  7. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    Number 10 wire is NOT heavy enough to put on a 60 amp breaker. You need number 6. You cannot put anything larger than a 30 amp on number 10. If the instructions say that they are simply wrong.
     
  8. cfabe

    cfabe Well-Known Member

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    Follow the insturctions. There are code exceptions to breaker sizing when it comes to dedicated circuits for things like motors and welders.
     
  9. Cosmic

    Cosmic Well-Known Member

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    As far as I can find all the Lincoln 225's are 230V. Looks just like mine except no DC abilities, AC stick only.

    More than likely it is set up for #6/3 wire as a 230VAC 50 amp circuit. Seems to be how the factory is listing that basic model number. Just like mine is. So that is wired from the main panel as a true 230V circuit using #6 / 3 wire with a dedicated 50 amp breaker / receptacle. Is how mine is wired.

    You need to understand exactly what you have and what is required. If unsure, time to call in somebody qualified that can tell. Nothing to screw around with and try to jury rig.
     
  10. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    There is no code exception to putting a 60 amp breaker on #10 wire. It is always illegal.
     
  11. idahodave

    idahodave Well-Known Member

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    Rob30 is in Canada. (I think) If he was in the US he could check the NEC section 630.12 (B) which allows conductor protection at 200% of the ampacity of the conductor when suppling one or more arc welders.

    If Rob is in Canada he should not follow advice that is based on the NEC.