Jumping Goat

Discussion in 'Goats' started by beckibell, Mar 3, 2005.

  1. beckibell

    beckibell New Member

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    Hello,
    I have a 10 month old Nubian who is terribly ill-mannered. I'm sure it is my fault as I am still new to the goat game and quite uneducated about how you are supposed to discipline a goat. His brother is very polite and has none of the same issues as he does.

    The main problem I'm having with this goat is that he is constantly jumping on me, and has done so since I first got him at five weeks. I have always tried to discourage it but I'm afraid I may actually be *encouraging* it, at least based on his reaction. When he jumps on me I push him down and say "NO!" but he actually seems to get a kick out of this. He must think I'm playing with him or something. In any event, it does nothing to curb the behavior.

    I'm nine months pregnant so you can see why this would be a problem for me! Also I worry about him becoming a full sized adult goat and still having this problem. I certainly won't be able to allow my son anywhere near him--such behavior is dangerous enough to a full grown adult like me or my husband, could be lethal for a child.

    Does anyone have any suggestions?
     
  2. chma4

    chma4 Wolverton Family Farm Supporter

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    Im pretty new to this myself, but it is my observation that goats hate water. Maybe if you squirt him in the face with a little household squirt bottle everytime he jumps on you this might give him the hint. It works on my dogs. I chose the squirt bottle because it was something they didnt like and got the point accross immediately when they are doing something unnacceptable (such as jumping on people). It hasnt seemed to hurt my dogs, maybe it will work on him. I don't think it can hurt, as long as its not too cold out.
     

  3. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    It sounds like he doesn't think you're the boss.

    Squirting them with water works on some goats. Others you'll have to bop them on the nose or twist their ears to get their attention. At 9 months pregnant, I don't imagine you feel all that agile, but throwing them down on their back does work really well if they truly won't get the point any other way. A full grown goat jumping up can get downright dangerous.
     
  4. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Fill a pop can with a handful of pennies, tape it shut with duct tape, and throw it and HIT him with it after you knock him off you. It will startle him a lot more than hurt him. Goats are NOT dogs, however, and are not always impressed by a "verbal" no -- sometimes you have to get physical. It upsets the kissy-poo animal types out there, but a swift kick won't hurt the goat (except for maybe his ego) and will do loads to improve his attitude ...

    Throwing them does indeed work if you can actually achieve it -- don't try it if you can't, because if you fail and the goat wins, you may make the problem worse.

    If you're pregnant, I'd be very careful around him. They can nail you pretty good if they decide to get an attitude. Might pay to wait a few weeks in this case ...

    Leva

     
  5. chma4

    chma4 Wolverton Family Farm Supporter

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    I am not a "kissy kissy animal hugger" but I like to at least try the less physical punishment first! Thats just me though!
     
  6. shorty'smom

    shorty'smom Well-Known Member

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    I have noticed that this is how the goats teach oach other who can be mesed whth and who can't. The doe who butts when you get too close to her is given a wide berth. I smack my overly familiar does on the head. Their heads are hard...they butt each other with them. They sort of get the message. I just act like a boss doe and shove them and knock them down when they behave badly. In your situation, it is hard, I know. You may need to get a helper for a few weeks so you don't have to mess with the goats.
     
  7. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    There are a couple of things you can do that won't hurt him but will discourage the activity. First, when he jumps up, cheerfully grab his front feet and walk toward him, with him walking backwards. If this seems too fun for him, speed up with your walking forward. He may tip over backward, but you can make sure he's OK by letting him down easy. In any case, this will be uncomfortable to him, and he'll likely quit jumping after a few backward rushes.

    Another way, that's only a little more risky, is to use your feet to sweep his hind legs out from under him when he jumps up. This is something you can do no matter whether he jumps on you from the front, rear or side, and it's been pretty effective for me. When you're doing this, ignore him. In other words, don't scold him or even pay any attention to him. Just take his feet out from under him. He'll figure out that falling over or running backward is kind of a natural consequence of jumping up. He won't hold it against you, and he'll stop jumping, most likely. Just be sure to pet him when he's being good with all fours on the ground, and only then.

    And, by the way, my hand was never meant to beat something as hard as a goat head! Plus, I don't want them hand-shy. When I have a goat acting up, I punt it with the side of my foot, like you do a soccer ball. This is a blunt, firm blow, like a goat gets from another goat. And I aim for the rib cage, nowhere else. You're very unlikely to do any damage there, and that's where other goats hit them, so they'll understand very well what you're getting at. Ooooh, I'm such a brute! :yeeha:
     
  8. moosemaniac

    moosemaniac Well-Known Member

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    My young buck and wether both did the same thing. I used the same procedure that worked on my dog. When they jump up, you pop your knee into their chest as you firmly say NO. It does work, but I don't think I'd being doing it if I were pregnant. Find someone to do the training for you.

    Ruth
     
  9. AnnaS

    AnnaS Well-Known Member

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    I like the squirt gun too. A sneeze sound-goat for "watch out!"- is more effective than "no"- goats know what "tschew!" means, but they have to learn no.
    Another thing that works is walking sl...ow...ly toward the offending animal, waving your hands above your head and screaming at the top of your lungs. This works on everything. :haha:
     
  10. burfer

    burfer Well-Known Member

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    I have one doe that is just HATEFUL to the other does! When she knows that it is feed time she will automatically start butting the others! This is a major problem since 2 of them are due at the end of March. She now has to eat separtley and I will stand with the others until they finish eating. She has learned that I am NOT to be messed with! The kissy-poo thing rarely works on a stubborn goat!
     
  11. beckibell

    beckibell New Member

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    Thank you everyone!! This gives me lots of things to try. Since my baby is due in a couple of weeks I think I'll start with some of the less physical options (squirt bottle), then after I've had the baby (and recovered) I'll move on to some of the things that require a little more agility, provided the squirt bottle doesn't do the trick. Main thing is to get this guy behaving by the time my son is old enough to be interested in petting goats--can't have an ill mannered goat interacting with a toddler!
     
  12. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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    I like water squirts, {or a cup full in the face when they climb on the rabbit yard fence} when I have hands free to do it.

    But, after trying every soft and gentel way of correction I could think of (even a shock collar) and being hurt by a goat while carrying feed, I resorted to a 1x2 board and paddle-ing the fire out of the well fleshed areas of the body, after running several circles around as I held the collar and my arm was tired, they have never jumped on me again, I can carry feed or what ever in safety, and they are not afraid of me at all, they all know "get out" and "I am picking up a stick" only the buck will challenge me from time to time, {he will block me from passing through doorways and gates} I have sticks placed at handy locations around the farm just incase.

    And for those that don't know I free range, so I have to "wade through the goats" everyday. at least once, often everytime I walk out of my house. I can walk up to any of them anytime, and handle them as I need to. I don't have to bribe them for foot trims or milking (they chew cud on the stand), or even my wethers first time in harness, he stood and waited and pulled the cart the 1st time no special training, because bad behavior is not something I will put up with.

    I am not saying you have to hit them, but hitting an animal to protect yourself or a child is not abuse. I had a large group of people here to visit was Oct. several small children where here, I locked up the buck and noone was injured while my goats continued to run loose.

    We did have some trouble with the horses wanting to play with the tents though. {they run loose too}