Johne's disease

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Sabrina, Oct 31, 2005.

  1. Sabrina

    Sabrina Well-Known Member

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    We borrowed a dairy goat for a summer from a friend a couple of years ago. I just found out that the goat has Johne's disease and has to be put down. We milked her for one summer, and then bottle fed her babies for six weeks the following spring. Could someone please give me information about this?

    Thanks,
    Sabrina
     
  2. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    hopefully you pasteurized the milk before you used it?
    we had some very good info on this board. go to search section and type "Johne's disease" in it
     

  3. Teacupliz

    Teacupliz Well-Known Member

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    test the goats you still have. Johns can be carried on the ground from the dung. Carried on your shoes from one place to another. So none of us are safe from it.

    Liz
    Teacup Farm
     
  4. Arborethic

    Arborethic Well-Known Member

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    I've found this Australian site to be very helpful with vet questions:

    http://vein.library.usyd.edu.au/search/searchsite.html
     
  5. Sabrina

    Sabrina Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I did pasturize the milk. And was careful in collecting milk in a sanitary way.

    I don't have other goats. Our experience is limited to this goat and her kids the following year. I would like to get goats someday when we have room for them.

    Is this something that is common? Is is routinely tested for?

    Thanks again.

    Sabrina
     
  6. Teacupliz

    Teacupliz Well-Known Member

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    Sabrina-
    I know many around here test for Johns, CL and CAE in goats. I do not test and try to be careful when I buy. I know that anything is possible with livestock and farming. People like me who were not born and raised on a farm have a harder time dealing with such issues. But I decided early on that I would put people first and not over worry. I would love to have a closed herd and keep all my goats at home but my daughter show and love it. I see no sence in wasting my money in testing when we could catch any or all at our county and state fairs and local shows. I do work very hard on prevention and try to be careful but I am only human. I know many who tested for years and then still the tested goat ended up with CAE. I also know many who keep goats with CAE and they live a long happy life. I know other suffer, that is why I use prevention..
    I did not mean to end up so long winded... Hope this helps you some.
    Liz
    Teacup Farm
     
  7. Wendy

    Wendy Well-Known Member

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    From what my vet told me, you can test for Johnes, but it is only accurate on a goat that is dead. So just because you may get negative results on a live animal doesn't mean they don't have the disease. They take the head of the dead animal to test. That is how they know for sure. So, was the positive result on a live goat or a dead goat? If it was on a live one, I'd wait to get the final result from the necropsy after it is dead. That would give you the best result.