Johne's and leukosis testing

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by willow_girl, Oct 8, 2005.

  1. willow_girl

    willow_girl Very Dairy

    Messages:
    14,609
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2002
    Location:
    Dysfunction Junction
    The outfit I work for is affiliated with a lab that does testing for Johne's and leukosis using milk samples.

    I thought I would post here, in case anybody was interested in having their cows tested. Leave a message here or PM me for more information; if anyone is interested I will check with the lab but I don't think there will be a problem with sending in a sample from someone other than the producers on my route.

    The cost should be less than $10 for each test. Yes, I will receive a small commission, less than a dollar, so that is not the motivating factor here. Ya'll know I'm really big on Johne's testing since losing my beloved Jersey cow just a year ago last month! I wish now that I had had her tested so I would know for sure whether it was Johne's that made her sick. Now I have a beautiful heifer who may or may not turn out positive. (I am planning to do a blood test on her before she freshens so I will know whether or not the calf can have her milk.) But I REALLY wish I'd had Dawnna tested before I bought her ... I could have avoided all this heartbreak! :(
     
  2. linn

    linn Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    3,441
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2005
    Is there any reliable treatment for Johne's disease?
     

  3. willow_girl

    willow_girl Very Dairy

    Messages:
    14,609
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2002
    Location:
    Dysfunction Junction
    Linn,

    Unfortunately, no. I believe antibiotic therapy can be of some value, but mostly prolongs the inevitable. :(

    The thing to keep in mind about Johne's is that young animals are most susceptible. So, controlling its spread means isolating known carriers from young stock (particularly when they enter the "active" phase of the disease) and making sure calves do not get colostrum/milk from infected mothers. I saw some research that indicated calves who receive as little as a single feeding from a carrier cow are likely to be infected!

    It has been my experience that Johnes-positive cows tend to give less milk, even before the disease enters its final stages. The stress of calving also seems to hit them harder.

    I hope someday there will be an effective treatment, both for this disease and Crohn's, which is likely its human form. It sure is an awful way to go. :(