Jersey Heifer

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by TSYORK, Mar 25, 2006.

  1. TSYORK

    TSYORK Jhn Boy ina D Trump world

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    I'm in NC, and was wanting to look into getting a Jersey heifer calf. How much should I anticipate paying for this... I want to breed for calves.
     
  2. MissKitty

    MissKitty Mrs. no longer OldGrouch.

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    Our last heifer had a great bloodline...and was registered...we got $1800 for her at 10 months...MissKitty
     

  3. shelbynteg

    shelbynteg Well-Known Member

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    Jersey heifer calves are $500 at 30 days from the dairies around here, typically I see them for 900-1000 at breeding age. We're in SE Texas.
     
  4. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    The price will depend heavily on their bloodline. For instance, where we bought ours had them from 500-2000 for 2 month old heifers. The $500-$600 heifers we bought didn't have the bloodlines that one 2000 heifer had that they had. We didn't buy her, but in a round about way, kinda sorta wish we did. Was a "spunkyline" family.


    Jeff
     
  5. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    At the current market prices, I wonder if a person might be better off buying a bred heifer or springing heifer. There is mortality risk starting out with a calf, and then the expense of feeding for 2 years, and possibly expense or difficulty of getting her bred, depending on your situation. A larger initial cash outlay, of course, but I wonder which you come out better? Any thoughts on the two options Jeff? Or anyone?
     
  6. jim/se kansas

    jim/se kansas Well-Known Member

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    I have eight Jersey heifers from one year to two years old. Open year old heifers sell for $900.00 each and bred heifers sell fron $1200.00 to $1600.00 each. That should give you idea of what their selling for. Yes you can find a good deal now and then for less.

    Hope this helps. Jim
     
  7. Donna from Mo

    Donna from Mo Well-Known Member

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    Would you have a yearling heifer in October that you would sell for that price? I'm in Missouri.
     
  8. Rickydink

    Rickydink Retired Navy Homesteader

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    I paid $250 for a 3 day old Guernsey/Jersey a year ago from a local dairy farm here in western NC.
     
  9. TSYORK

    TSYORK Jhn Boy ina D Trump world

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    Where in Western NC are you, I'm in Western NC.... I would love to find a deal like that, do you know if they are still making those kinds of deals?
     
  10. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Personally a bred heifer would make life easier, cost less, because your not raising it from a calf. The advantage to getting a calf is it would know you from a youngen, however most heifers will adapt, and become a "pet" after some work, mostly gaining its trust. Then there are the ones from a farm where they are all friendly, that makes things go easier. So lets weigh what you gain from a bred heifer, to a calf.

    Pros for both <>
    Calf: The pride to raise it up to breeding age
    Bred Heifer: Don't have to worry about its first breeding.
    Calf: It knows you, and usually calves adapt faster
    Bred Heifer: Less money spent
    Calf: You select what to breed it to at time of breeding.
    Bred Heifer: You can see what the animal looks like, more or less can see its strength and weaknesses

    Cons for both <>
    Calf: Risk for it getting sick, from either transporting, or otherwise
    Calf: Cost, milk replacer, grain, and more time out of your day.
    Bred Heifer: Can't choose who to breed to, if already bred
    Bred Heifer: Will cost you more at the time of buying it ($500 for a calf, $1500 or so for a bred heifer).
    Calf:Can't see how it turns out when it gets older


    Can't think of anything else. But what I mean by what it looks like. As a calf, most calves do look the same. As the animal gets older, its body changes. Its rump changes, its topline, its feet and legs, etc. As a bred heifer, you can see these changes as is, there won't be speculation, perhaps a calf has some weak loins, or perhaps will end up with bad feet. As a bred heifer, or alteast a heifer older (year or so), You can get a good idea. If I were to buy heifers, I would tend to stick with yearlings, for the reason I mentioned, also cost. The Jerseys we bought were young, I had no idea what they would look like now, as they all looked similar. They all look fine, but if I was being fussy, and after super strength, a couple would stand out more than others. My holstein heifers I bought were around 6 months old, I wish I bought some at 1 yr. Because the heifers I bought at a year, did change some, but were farther along, and they didn't adjust as slowly as the younger stock. The 4 I bought came in, took a little bit to adjust, but not as long as the 6 month olds.


    Either way, its your choice, personally I would go after something a year old, or bred (freshly bred, not 1 month from calving).


    Jeff
     
  11. Vere My Sone

    Vere My Sone Well-Known Member

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    I'm glad to hear you're in western NC, because there are NO cows in this side of the state, except beef :(
     
  12. Rickydink

    Rickydink Retired Navy Homesteader

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    I am near Valdese, west of Hickory in Burke County. I began my search online by looking for Guernsey breeders and made contact with a few. I kept pestering a dairy farmer nearby and he was willing to part with her. I have seen some Jersey s listed in the IWANNA classifieds recently. From what I have since learned, I must agree with JeffNY that an older heifer/cow that is bred back would be better for most folks. We have enjoyed raising Elsie from a bottle but we will have 2 years invested in her before we get a drop of milk.

    Rick