Jersey cream content

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by spinnDrSandy, Jun 27, 2006.

  1. spinnDrSandy

    spinnDrSandy Active Member

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    Betty and Buford just presented us with Beatrice. She is now about 15 days old. Betty started giving excellent milk with a high cream content. The cream content has become less and less. Is it normal for the cream content to lessen? Beatrice stays with her and nurses at will. We get about 1 1/2 gallons a day from her. She is on sweet feed, hay and pasture.

    Also, Beatrice has a "turned up nose". It is as if she has an underbite with her bottom jaw jutting out slightly. It was really bad at birth but seems to be getting better. Could this have come from her nose being smushed against the placenta before birth and it is just taking time for her nose to become unsmushed?
    Thanks,
    Spin Doctor Sandy
     
  2. milkinpigs

    milkinpigs Dairy/Hog Farmer

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    I think you might be confusing cream with colostrum; the colostrum appears as thick cream and as the cow progresses in her lactation,her milk becomes more normal looking and in consistency
     

  3. spinnDrSandy

    spinnDrSandy Active Member

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    Don't think I am confusing the two. We made good butter from the cream we skimmed from the first few days. We waited 4 day after Beatrice's birth to start using the milk.
     
  4. milkinpigs

    milkinpigs Dairy/Hog Farmer

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    Okay, then the answer is yes, butterfat can change due to variety of reasons,such as what you feed, if you feed different hay or cottonseed, if she has access to really good pasture, she might give more milk but have less butterfat content. As far as your other question, if you see a change, chances are she'll be fine.There are jerseys that never get rid of that condition, but have no problems other than looks. If she's eating and looking healthy, sonds like she's ok.
     
  5. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Since the calf is nursing she is probably not letting down completely and what is being kept back for the calf is your cream.
     
  6. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    I agree with Roseanna - cows can be VERY good at holding back when sharemilked with their calves..

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  7. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    I also agree that she's not letting down. When I was milking, I would always seperate the calf at night. In the morning, before I started to milk, I would let the calf in for a minute to start nursing. The cow would then let the milk down for the calf. I would pull the calf away and seperate again, and milk the cow, leaving a quarter or two for the calf, depending on how much milk I wanted. I'd then leave the calf with the cow during the day, and seperate again at night.