Jersey bulls

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by pointer_hunter, Aug 14, 2004.

  1. pointer_hunter

    pointer_hunter Well-Known Member

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    I talked to my father today on the phone and he said he had a line on some jersey bull calves by his house for sale. He said the sign read, "$18.00 and up." I know that jersey bulls really aren't good for a dairy farm, but are they that bad that they should be so cheap? How much room would one need to raise a few to butcher weight and how well does this breed put on the weight? I have a beefmaster cow out with the family bm heard, but I thought about maybe getting a few of these guys and keeping them at the house. Any and all information on this is greatly appreciated as I need as much ammunition I mean information when I try to talk my DW into this.
     
  2. Jim in MO

    Jim in MO Well-Known Member

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    I’m currently raising two Jersey’s for slaughter myself. You’ll find that they take quite a bit longer to raise to slaughter weight than the typical beef cow and the marbling will be yellowish instead of white. All in all I think they make great beef and for the little cost of a bottle Jersey bull it works for me. I have yet to find anyone who can tell me that they have made a profit raising Jersey’s for slaughter because there really isn’t a market for them. But, for the home freezer I think they are great.

    Jim in MO
     

  3. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Jersey bull calves or steers are at the bottom rung of the price ladder at any age. They are cheap at birth, but the feed they eat costs the same as the feed you would give a higher priced beefier type calf. It would be hard to raise them for resale and show any profit. One or two for your own meat might make them worth while unless you prefer a more choicer grade of meat.
     
  4. pointer_hunter

    pointer_hunter Well-Known Member

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    Thanks.....

    I would have thought they would take less time to butcher weight as they were a smaller size. I'll have to run out and brush up on my breed characteristics.
     
  5. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    PH, The yeild is lower, but the quality is there, and for some, the economy too. As stated, the yellow fat turns some folks okk, but the beef is fine, just not so much of it.
     
  6. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Oh, heck, forgot to ad, they can be misserably hard to get to survive through the first month. Get the best quality milk replacer (or even better, put it on a cow), and watch it's health as close as you can.
     
  7. AR Transplant

    AR Transplant Well-Known Member

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    ok, this newbie has a question,

    aren't jersey bulls supposed to be meaner than a snake? If you band them does that fix the problem?

    I am just wondering, and I also have a jersey milk cow that is currently bred to a limousine bull, if it turns out to be a bull, would he be a problem?

    Thanks,

    Arkansas Transplant
     
  8. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    Jersey bulls have a bad reputation with reason. They can be mean. They won't turn bad before sexual maturity (kind of like teenagers...puberty hits and they go haywire!). If you castrate the calf you should have no problems.


    Jena
     
  9. OD

    OD Well-Known Member

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    AR Transplant,
    We eat all the steer calves from my Jersey cow, & the best one we ever ate was out of a Limosine bull. We never weaned him, just fed him & the cow together. When he was 6 months old, we butchered him. He only weighed 660# but he was delicious.
     
  10. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    They are.
    Yes - well - to get them back to being as safe as an animal so much larger than you can be.
    I would never trust a bull with any element of Jersey in it. Heck, I'd never trust a bull anyway. Although some of them can be nice enough individuals, they're still MUCH bigger and stronger than the average human, and you can never really tell what's going to be going on in a bull's mind in the next second. Nor can they. Some of them, you might be safe provided you give yourself a retreat path they can't get into - probably. Anything with Jersey blood can be testosterone-poisoned, paranoid, schizophrenic, and as light on its feet as a cat. Even those that are big kitty-cats one second can be rabid leopards half a second later.

    But of course, castration makes all the difference.

    They're still a lot bigger and stronger than you are though, Never ignore those facts. Don't be terrified by it, but never forget it either. Be safe.
     
  11. AR Transplant

    AR Transplant Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, I really like the idea of having one in the freezer at 6 months. We love jersey meat, but have never had a cross. She will be due March 30th, give or take how ever long she decides to take.

    Because of your advice, if this one is a bull he will be banded as soon as possible. Then, come September it's off to freezerville.

    Thanks again,
    Arkansas Transplant
     
  12. Stand_Watie

    Stand_Watie Well-Known Member

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    My father knows a man who was killed by a Jersey bull. He raised it from a calf and didn't think it'd get mean on him, but it smashed him up against the fence and broke his ribs, punctured lung etc and he died later from pneumonia.

    I've heard people say they have 'short man's disease'