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Hello!
We are purchasing a bred, 2 year old Jersey / Belted Galloway cross bred heifer to be our family's milk cow. :)
She will be joining our family in a couple of weeks, and she should calve for the first time in November.
I have never had a cow before, just dairy goats, so this whole cow thing is new to me.
I decided to go with a this particular cross because I did not want a cow that produced 5+ gallons a day. Our family simply will not use that much.
Also, because if we would like to get a beef calf, we could breed her to a galloway and get a nice meat baby. Same if we decided that we wanted a dairy baby.
I really think this gal will serve our family well, but I would very much like to hear your opinions on this cross...

(Attached is a pic of our little gal. She is bred to a pure Belted Galloway bull)

96309
 

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Hello!
We are purchasing a bred, 2 year old Jersey / Belted Galloway cross bred heifer to be our family's milk cow. :)
She will be joining our family in a couple of weeks, and she should calve for the first time in November.
I have never had a cow before, just dairy goats, so this whole cow thing is new to me.
I decided to go with a this particular cross because I did not want a cow that produced 5+ gallons a day. Our family simply will not use that much.
Also, because if we would like to get a beef calf, we could breed her to a galloway and get a nice meat baby. Same if we decided that we wanted a dairy baby.
I really think this gal will serve our family well, but I would very much like to hear your opinions on this cross...

(Attached is a pic of our little gal. She is bred to a pure Belted Galloway bull)

View attachment 96309
She’s a beautiful if that’s her sire behind her than he’s beautiful to has he tried to mount her (never mind I read the part you put I didn’t know she was exposed to her sire yet)
 

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She's a cutie. Hope she has been handled by people daily or you'll have quite a rodeo on your hands later
 

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Be powerful. No other option exists.
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Love on her every day. Brush, pet, rub. Get her used to being handled.

She is lovely.
 

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Jerseys are a smaller breed and have tiny calves. A cross bred will have larger calves than a Jersey. As she gets closer to having her first calf, it becomes critical that you know what she was bred to. As a first time calving, a Galloway size calf will kill a Jersey or Jersey cross. Same concern for your future sire selections. Some Angus have low birth weight. If you use artificial insemination, there is predictable calving birth weight sires. Pulling pieces of a calf to save the life of your cow is costly and heartbreaking. With your desire for limited milk, I do not understand why you'd consider a crossbred. Seems you'd want the higher cream and smaller appetite of a Jersey. Also, breeding is are more than a dairy or beef. Breed her to a Jersey bull and you might get a nice heifer for a family milk cow. But you also may get a worthless 3/4 Jersey, 1/4 Galloway bull calf.
 

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Jerseys are a smaller breed and have tiny calves. A cross bred will have larger calves than a Jersey. As she gets closer to having her first calf, it becomes critical that you know what she was bred to. As a first time calving, a Galloway size calf will kill a Jersey or Jersey cross. Same concern for your future sire selections. Some Angus have low birth weight. If you use artificial insemination, there is predictable calving birth weight sires. Pulling pieces of a calf to save the life of your cow is costly and heartbreaking. With your desire for limited milk, I do not understand why you'd consider a crossbred. Seems you'd want the higher cream and smaller appetite of a Jersey. Also, breeding is are more than a dairy or beef. Breed her to a Jersey bull and you might get a nice heifer for a family milk cow. But you also may get a worthless 3/4 Jersey, 1/4 Galloway bull calf.
Yeah I agree here we have a 3/4 red angus 1/4 miniature angus cross and we got very lucky she didn’t have any problems becuase we would have had to pull her calf out their both doing great the baby was born on saint patty’s day it was a heifer !
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Unpaid, Volunteer Devil's Advocate
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What am I looking at here I see a cow giving birth to a calf
It is a calf unable to pass through the birth canal that had to be cut into pieces to get out of the cow to save her life. This was her first calf. She's Angus and was bred to an Angus bull, but he tends to sire bigger calves. It serves as a warning to those that mix cattle breeds of the danger, heart break and expense of a bad choice.
 

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It is a calf unable to pass through the birth canal that had to be cut into pieces to get out of the cow to save her life. This was her first calf. She's Angus and was bred to an Angus bull, but he tends to sire bigger calves. It serves as a warning to those that mix cattle breeds of the danger, heart break and expense of a bad choice.
As a former Dexter breeder, I am astounded when I read of all the cross-breeding that is now going on with them -- a once valued heritage breed, the traditional "family cow," known for its ability to provide milk for a family as well as her calf. There are a number of breeders who monitor their bloodlines carefully, safeguard their preservation efforts, and produce wonderful Dexters. Sadly there are many others who want "a little more milk," and "a larger amount of beef," etc., so they cross their cows with whatever's available, risking the well-being of their animals in order to achieve those goals.
 

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Jersey cows are among the easiest calvers in the bovine world. I think your cross is probably not such a bad one. While the Jersey tends to be a tad lighter, The BG isn't too much heavier so I don't envisage problems with calving. Both the Jersey and the BG are good foragers, and while I've never owned BG's, I know for a fact that my Jersey's will eat what my Friesians wouldn't even look at and the BG's have the same reputation.

Abra, you will probably find that your cow, in her first lactation, might not produce as much as you had hoped - do you envisage sharemilking with the calf? After you've had each other for a couple of years, she may well give you more milk than you know what to do with so hope you have dogs, chooks, pigs to feed it to. :) Wish you well with your venture, milking my cows was the most therapeutic part of my day.

And just as a matter of interest, I have a Jersey cow which will be 25 in August. She no longer calves, not because of her age but because she severed both tendons in her back left leg. She calved once since the accident and her foot gave nothing but problems - foot rot and white line disease. She is now a baby sitter for other cows with calves:) Having said that, her daughter is a R20 - Jersey/Belgian Blue cross. Her granddaughter is R18 - Jersey/BB/Angus cross and her great-grandaughter is now Jersey/BB and half Angus. All of them are still calving and one of them I still milk - her daughter.

Cheers,
Ronnie
 
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