Jan 12'07-URGENT

Discussion in 'Goats' started by wishomesteader, Jan 12, 2007.

  1. wishomesteader

    wishomesteader Well-Known Member

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    Sannen had babies 3 days ago, everything seemed fine and normal, however, now she will not get up to do anything...just lays there...HELP waht do we do??? :help:

    my friend is the owner of this goat and we are lost'

    Jan 13, 2007
    Judy is calling the vet and most likely will put her down. This was not my goat so I could not take care of any of the vitals, etc...My goats see the vet on a regular basis. As a matter of fact, I got one yesterday and 2 hours later, she was at the vet for a physical. Since I have read every book there is, there is no sub for hands on knowledge. The vet comments on the excellent care I give all my animals...holistic foods, their own personal garden for there vegetables (yes, the goats have their own garden to eat from ), etc...they are not livestock to me but a sense of worth and companionship. Thanks for the help, Carla
     
  2. ChickenMom

    ChickenMom Well-Known Member

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    Did you check for worms? My first one did that with a worm overload because I didn't know to worm her. Does she have a temp? Check her bottom eyelids for color (pink, pale, white).
     

  3. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    call a vet ASAP. this doe is dying
     
  4. Idahoe

    Idahoe Menagerie More~on

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    milk fever . . .she needs a vet to give her IV calcium ASAP.
     
  5. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    I would fear milk fever/ketosis - but I'm no expert, I don't know if that can happen three days out or not. You give propylene glycol, CMPK gel for those.

    If she had a rough kidding - could she have retained a placenta, or have a uterine infection? She could use an antibiotic if so. My vet recommended using Today or Tomorrow (mastitis teat infusion) inserted in the vagina, for several days plus an injectable antibiotic like penicillin.

    Good luck - hope you get some more specific advice soon. Can you tempt her with warm, molasses water?

    Niki
     
  6. AllWolf

    AllWolf We love all our animals

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    If you have a vet get a hold of him now. This doe needs help... NOW. Anything could be wrong so she needs a vet to see her fast....

    Good Luck and be praying for you.

    Here is some things to help you also..

    Clinical Signs: Of Milk Fever..
    The doe seems weak.
    Decrease in appetite
    Mild bloat or constipation
    The doe is wobbly on her feet.
    Inability to stand.
    Muscular trembling.
    Weakened uterine contractions
    Decreased body temperature.
    The doe may stop ruminating, urinating or defecating.
    Shivering after milking

    Treatment: This is from a Farm Site.
    A vet may give 50 to 100 ml of 25% calcium borogluconate intravenously, but this is very dangerous for inexperienced goat keepers and death can result.

    Calcium Gluconate 23% Solution: 8 to 12 oz. given orally. Repeat 5-8 oz, three times a day until the doe is eating and symptoms are subsiding.
    or
    Calcium Gluconate 23% Solution: 40 cc injected over her ribs. The injections should be broken down into 3 or 4 injections and given in different sites. The injections should be given slowly.

    If the doe is lying on her side, prop her up with a bale of hay so that she is laying on her breastbone (normally). This prevents rumen fluid from entering her lungs and prevents bloat from developing

    If you are milking the doe, do not take too much milk for the next few milkings.



    Signs of Ketosis :
    The doe eats less or stops eating completely.
    Depression
    Seperation from the herd
    The doe may be slow to get up or may lie off in a corner.
    Her eyes are dull.
    Somestimes blindness
    Muscle tremors & seizures
    Staggering
    Head pressing
    She may have swollen ankles
    She may grind her teeth.
    The doe may breathe more rapidly.
    The doe's breath and urine may have a fruity sweet odor. This is due to the excess ketones, which have a sweet smell.

    Treatment:
    Oral glucose:

    Molasses & Karo syrup (corn syrup). Mix 2 parts corn syrup to 1 part molasses. 20 - 30ml every 2 hours. This tastes much better than PG and thus is less stressful to administer.
    Propylene Glycol: Propylene Glycol is an appetite suppressant and it inhibits rumen bacteria, so do not use unless the doe is off her feed.
    3-4 oz (90-120ml) 2 times a day, for 2 days, and then 1-2 oz (30ml-60ml) 2 times daily until the doe is eating normally.
    or
    10 - 20ml every 2 hours
    Nutridrench, Goatdrench: 2 oz. 2 times a day
    B-Complex: injections to stimulate the appetite.

    Probios: to stimulate the appetite and keep the rumen functioning.

    Children's Chewable Vitamins w/ extra Calcium: If the doe will eat them, feed her 2-4 a day.

    Rescue Remedy: Helps to reduce stress levels.

    Lavender Essential Oil: This is an aromatherapy treatment for stress and depression. The doe may get depressed if she is not feeling well. Also, the drenching of Propylene Glycol (which doesn't taste very good) can be stressful on the doe. Lavender has a calming and mood lifting effect. Place 4 drops of oil in three different places in the doe's stall twice a day.

    Even through it is the treatment for Milk Fever, I have found that it is also helpful to give:

    Calcium Gluconate:

    8 oz. given orally. Repeat 5-8 oz, three times a day until the doe is eating and symptoms are subsiding.
    OR
    SQ Injections of 40-60 cc of Calcium Gluconate. The injections should be broken down into at least 4 injections in different sites. Do not give more than 10 cc per injection site. The injections should be given slowly.
    Once the doe has regained her appetite, increase her grain ration so that a relapse does not occur.


    Please Keep Us Posted...
     
  7. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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  8. DocM

    DocM Well-Known Member

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    Excuse my lack of empathy, but this is the kind of post that drives me nuts. Not enough info for anyone to give credible advice, except for you to call the vet. A goat can go down post pregnancy for an untold number of reasons. She may just need a booster of b complex, or she may die in an hour. Who knows?
     
  9. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    have to agree on last post.
     
  10. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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    I think lots of new goat people just don't know what to put in a post. They don't know what to look for and what vitals to take.
     
  11. Sweet Goats

    Sweet Goats Cashmere goats

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    I do agree wit hDoc but it is hard when you are scared and you forget to give all the info.

    OK what I did for a doe that is a lot like this. She delivered twins. 20 hours I went out to deliver another does kid (breach), I saw something was wrong. So I went into her. I pulled out another baby. I was abole to say them both. But what I did for mom was I took Calcium pills (mine) and I putthem in a blender and crushed them. I offered them to her in puwder form. She ate them all. It was about 10 pills. I went out later that day and bought some calcium that is in a tube.

    I hope you were able to get ahold of you vet. God be with you, and good luck. Please keep us updated.
     
  12. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    They SHOULD know if they own the animals.
     
  13. diamonds

    diamonds Well-Known Member

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    I think you are right. I know to take all the vitals and I know more info should be posted. However I am sure if I get into a panic over one of my Kritter Kids I may just forget to post some of the needed info. Everyone deals with stress and situations in a different manner. Some are so calm that you can not tell that it is even bothering them. Others actually do really panic which is the worst thing you can do but I do not fault them for it.


    Wishomesteader my heart goes out to you. I hope your doe comes through this just fine.
     
  14. DocM

    DocM Well-Known Member

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    Actually, if you look at the top post sticky (which is ALWAYS in the top three), GOAT EMERGENCY - what to list of what to check when asking for help is the top post within that thread.

    I really can't think of a way to convey the info more clearly. Call me insensitive, but the panicked owner isn't my concern, the poor animal who's owner isn't prepared is. If you're panicked, call the vet, don't visit a message board.
     
  15. NWMO

    NWMO Well-Known Member

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    I do enjoy your section of Homesteading and you folks are very good at encouraging and helping each other out.....pat yourselves on the back!

    But I would tend to agree......if you are going to post urgent, I would suspect from my view, you are sitting at the computer, awaiting someone to respond within minutes.....clarification can occur immediately etc.......

    It is amazing how I can be reading a post from home or the office and not get it out of my mind, and I keep checking back for results.....and seem more concerned than the poster! However, I know others can't devote as much time to the computer screen as I can at times!
     
  16. Idahoe

    Idahoe Menagerie More~on

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    Yes yes yes, all that. Patty's right, new owners don't always know what is important to post OR the unspoken "rules" to post by. It isn't important what I or anyone else feels about "posts like this", telling her to call the vet is good enough.
     
  17. fishhead

    fishhead Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you are new to a site it's also easy to overlook the obvious like Goat Emergency especially when a person is focusing on something else like a sick animal.
     
  18. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    But realistically how many do you think do, or can afford the vet? I doubt many do at all, and it's why we should have more of us with our phone numbers on our posts. I have no choice but to take mine down during kidding season. Even folks in goats several years don't have a relationship with a vet to even get basic meds. You have goats awhile before you realize that if you don't figure this out on your own, you can not get good answers from all vets, because what they learned in a book hs no realistic function on the day to day of the farm. Vicki
     
  19. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    Gently, people, gently.

    Even with all the research and reading I did and continued to do when acquiring goats, real life situations can still be hard to call without the best of all teachers---experience.

    In all my reading, and I read extensively, I encountered many situations that I knew nothing about. That is where the experience of people on this forum helped me tremendously. One example is when one of my kids developed tetany. I did web searches with her symptoms and got nothing. One post on this forum brought the diagnosis and the treatment---and it worked. Now I know what it is and what to do about it. My vet's treatment of cocci was ineffective, therefore the answers I sought and got on this forum. And again, they worked.

    It helps when the knowledge of experience is shared with encouragement and empathy, not condemnation and criticism.

    Thank God I have not lost a goat yet, and thanks to research and the input of many from this forum, I have 25 healthy goats in excellent condition, after a harrowing first year with a steep learning curve.

    But my first real kidding season is looming before me, and I am sure that the difference between reading about something and seeing it firsthand will bring me more learning experiences, hopefully without loss.

    If I need to ask questions, I will seek both people I know with experience and also do research online, as well as ask questions on this forum. I will certainly call the vet if it is warranted. I do have one that is fairly good with goats.

    I hope I don't get sliced and diced for trying my best as a beginner, because I asked for knowledgable advice, while seeking solutions from all possible venues.
     
  20. wishomesteader

    wishomesteader Well-Known Member

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    Judy is calling the vet and most likely will put her down. This was not my goat so I could not take care of any of the vitals, etc...My goats see the vet on a regular basis. As a matter of fact, I got one yesterday and 2 hours later, she was at the vet for a physical. Since I have read every book there is, there is no sub for hands on knowledge. The vet comments on the excellent care I give all my animals...holistic foods, their own personal garden for there vegetables (yes, the goats have their own garden to eat from ), etc...they are not livestock to me but a sense of worth and companionship. Thanks for the help, Carla