Ivermectin Injectable

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by glidergurl03, Oct 5, 2006.

  1. glidergurl03

    glidergurl03 Well-Known Member

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    I've heard this is okay for sheep and goats...Anyone know dosages? We bought it for the cattle, etc, and would like to worm the sheep and goats at the same time if possible being it's so damn expensive lol. Thanks!
     
  2. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Don't know about goats but the dosage for sheep is 0.5ml per 25kg liveweight and pigs is 1.00ml per 33kg liveweight. Check with your vet about its useage for goats.

    Now I suppose your going to want me to go away and work out the kg to lb conversion :)

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     

  3. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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  4. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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    25 kg = 55lbs

    I always dose 1 cc for every 50lbs. That is the dose I use for goats so I use it for the sheep to , just easier for me. I give it orally.

    Patty
     
  5. glidergurl03

    glidergurl03 Well-Known Member

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    You give the injectable type orally?
     
  6. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    All sheep and goat wormers should be given orally
     
  7. glidergurl03

    glidergurl03 Well-Known Member

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    Why? And why would you give injectable orally? There's an oral Ivermectin...
     
  8. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Bear, that seems to be a strange thing to say. Literally 1,000's of sheep are wormed using injectable wormers - there is a choice as Glider has pointed out.

    Glider, I'm a great believer in using a product for the purpose it was intended. If it's supposed to be injected then that is how I administer it; if it's supposed to be given orally, the same applies. If it's not supposed to be given to a particular breed then I don't give it unless ok'd by a vet in what we call "off label". Did you find out if it's ok for goats? I don't keep them but believe that many wormers are not good for them?

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  9. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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    Ivermectin 1 % cattle injectable was made for cows. Goat and sheep metabalize things different. There is a sheep drench with ivermectin same active ingredients in a base , it just costs more. By injecting it into sheep and goats it releases a small amount of the drug over a long time. By doing so it kills lower numbers over a period of time. It is not effective and creates resist worms. By giving it orally you get in kill the worms and get out .

    Yes goats and sheep can both use it 1cc per 50 lbs
     
  10. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    Most wormers are "off label" for goats and sheep. Its been proven that giving them orally WORKS BETTER. Yes there ARE different strengths and formulations, but that doesnt change the fact that orally is the BEST way to do it.

    "Smart Drenching Worm like you mean it!

    You are trying to get the absolute maximum effectiveness from your worming treatments.
    Hold the animals off feed for 12 –24 hours. This makes the wormer get to where it needs to go faster and at a higher level.
    Make sure you give the wormer over the tongue instead of in the cheek pouch. Using a dosing syringe can help.
    Repeat the dose in 12 hours for panacur and valbazen or 24 hours for levamisole.

    Give all wormers orally to sheep and goats

    Give 1 ½-2 times the sheep or cattle dose
    For cydectin, (yes, you give this orally too) give sheep the cattle dose (1cc per 50#). For goats, give twice that amount (1cc per 25#).
    Modern wormers are extremely safe (except levamisole). Don’t be afraid to give more if they spit some out. " http://www.newrossvet.com/sheep.htm

    "Drenching (deworming)

    Anti-parasitic drugs should always be administered to sheep and goats orally, even if a pour-on or injectable product is used. Single and multi-dose drench guns are available for administering oral medications to sheep and goats. You can restrain the animal by straddling it or standing beside it and placing your hand under its jaw. The syringe should be inserted into the corner of the animal's mouth and rested on its tongue. The plunger should be slowly pushed so that the medicine goes over the tongue. Once the animal has swallowed the syringe can be released. Care should be taken not to underdose animals. Weight should be obtained using a scale or tape measure to assure proper dosage. Underdosing leads to drug resistance"
    http://www.sheepandgoat.com/articles/generalhealthcare.html


    "Producers are reminded that the use of any dewormer in goats, other than fenbendazole (Safe Guard® or Panacur®) or morantel tartrate (Rumatel® Medicated Premix), constitutes extra-label drug use"

    http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cach...orm+orally&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=30&ie=UTF-8