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Anybody ever had IV Sedation for surgical procedures? What's it like? Could you hear/feel what's going on?? Any info appreciated!!
 

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LOL, I had to laugh right out loud at this question. You asked if you can hear or feel anything. I had IV sedation so I can only relate my experience to you. You can hear what is going on around you BUT you just don't care. And when I say you dont care I mean it! It is the oddest sensation to have absolutely no cares in the world. Many people just go to sleep. It isn't frightening or stressful at all :)
 

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It all depends on what medications are used.

When we do IV sedation for colonoscopies and EGD's, we use propofol, which is also used in general anesthesia. You're out like a light, and you don't remember anything.

If it's Demerol and Versed, or Fentanyl and Versed, yes, you can be aware of what is going on around you. Most people don't care, and a lot of people don't remember a whole lot of what happens.

It also depends on how much they give you.

Most of my patients do quite well. You shouldn't have anything to worry about...
 

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I had an IV anesthetic during my eye surgeries. Didn't seem like it was doing much when I had it but I was relaxed while talking to them while they did the surgeries. However, later that day all I wanted to do was sleep, probably from the drugs. Only bad part is getting the needle into your hand, after that its simple.

Ken in Glassboro, NJ
 

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You can hear what is going on around you BUT you just don't care. And when I say you dont care I mean it! It is the oddest sensation to have absolutely no cares in the world.
I had that when they put a camera down my throat & into my stomach. I was so far into la-la land that I wasn't even aware of having anything in me.

But do believe them when they say you shouldn't drive. I thought I could get away with it but they wouldn't release me until my dh came for me. The fact that I didn't argue means I was still under the influence! :icecream:
 

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It all depends on what medications are used.

When we do IV sedation for colonoscopies and EGD's, we use propofol, which is also used in general anesthesia. You're out like a light, and you don't remember anything.

If it's Demerol and Versed, or Fentanyl and Versed, yes, you can be aware of what is going on around you. Most people don't care, and a lot of people don't remember a whole lot of what happens.

It also depends on how much they give you.

Most of my patients do quite well. You shouldn't have anything to worry about...
Propofol is a GREAT drug. They used it for my colonoscopy a few years ago and I woke up really fast with little residual grogginess and felt 100% normal within about 30 minutes.

Had a nice chat with the anesthesiologist about drugs, too. Told him the dog vets used some propofol, but I didn't use it in my feline patients because I was so happy with my Ace/Torb/Ketamine/Diazepam (valium) cocktail in them. He agreed ketamine was a great, safe drug, but lamented its unsuitability in adult humans due to the hallucinations and excitability problems.

I've had Versed. Too much tendency to partly wake up and get weirded out, IMHO.
 

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It all depends on what medications are used.

When we do IV sedation for colonoscopies and EGD's, we use propofol, which is also used in general anesthesia. You're out like a light, and you don't remember anything.

"Propofol"...so that's what it is.
You truly are out like a light! Snap!!

With the old anesthetics I could feel myself fade away and sounds like bells chiming. This new stuff is amazing.
Stef
 

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I had a bad reaction to versed once. I got very agitated (as I now know the PDR says can happen. Very out of character for me.
 

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I wondered if I could tell them to give me enough to make me sleep?
This is only from someone that has received an unfortunate amount of IV sedation and anesthesia. I would tell them exactly what you are worried about...i.e.: I get really panicky and I am worried I will have a panic attack, I've had "X" drug before and I had a bad reaction (rash, racing heart, nausea, ect), or just that I'm really scared that I will be able to feel the pain. Their aim is to make you comfortable just make sure to share your worries, they can't tailor it for you if you don't tell them.

All that said, like everyone else said it depends on the drug and how you will feel or if you will fall asleep.
 

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I don't recall a thing other than being woke up afterwards.
 

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Do tell them if you'd like to just go to sleep :) Some procedures they'll need you to be awake enough to tell them if you can move a toe or something. (I had nerves in my lower back sliced and frozen once and they needed me to be awake so I could move my toes after they blocked a nerve)

You'll do fine :) Talk with your docs and the nurses who put you under/start the IV. They're REAL used to nervous patients.
 

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I hate recovering a patient who has had ketamine. It's a great anesthetic, but the effects when someone is waking up is very much like an LSD trip. The room needs to be kept dark and quiet for these patients--try managing that in a busy recovery room. Ain't gonna happen, so the patients are usually agitated. It's a bear to deal with.

I love propofol. Folks do very well with it, and it has antiemetic properties, so nausea and vomiting are not nearly the problem that I had when I first started nursing 27 years ago...
 

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I had this last summer for an endoscopy. The only down side was, well, I tended to repeat myself...OFTEN!!! for the next couple of days. I couldn't remember much, and I was the nicest person ever...really...EVER!!! It was hilarious! I thanked everyone for eveything, repeatedly. My family in the spirit of 'you'll laugh at this later' video taped me...and they were right...it was roll on the floor laughing time!! I was very apprehensive of it prior to the procedure and now if I have to get something like that done again, I will be perfectly comfortable with it (and apologize ahead of time for my courtesy!!!teehee!!!)

=)Bonnie
 

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I also *ahem* .... experienced conscious sedation last winter (Versed and Fentanyl). It was just fine, and I certainly was nervous! No nausea, and I felt okay afterward, just a little out of it. Maybe more than a little, but not in a sick feeling sort of way.

DH had a million laughs driving me on the way home, though. I insisted on sunglasses for the ride (it was overcast, mind you), and moved very slowly, with caution. He kept saying "You be a manatee!" all the way up the stairs to the bedroom, and kept poking me in the rear. I would have whacked him, but I was way too "into" slothing down the hall to bed! Jerk. :)
 

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My family in the spirit of 'you'll laugh at this later' video taped me...
I am so scared of being sedated it's not funny. My doc has suggested a few procedures but I am a total control freak and the idea of being out of control is absolutely horrid for me. Though I also told my family should I ever undergo any sort of surgical procedure required anesthesia that I'm going to request no visitors until I'm completely awake because I'm afraid they'd do something like this.

Would a hospital honor that kind of patient request?
 

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I am so scared of being sedated it's not funny. My doc has suggested a few procedures but I am a total control freak and the idea of being out of control is absolutely horrid for me. Though I also told my family should I ever undergo any sort of surgical procedure required anesthesia that I'm going to request no visitors until I'm completely awake because I'm afraid they'd do something like this.

Would a hospital honor that kind of patient request?
Maria! You described my past fears regarding sedation completely. I was terrified of feeling out of control, and thought I'd be destined to some sort of "bad trip" due to my freaking out and resisting unconsciousness. I also worried that I'd be the one person out of a thousand to have an allergic reaction. But the day came where I had to have a procedure requiring "conscious sedation."

Maria... for hours afterwards I was saying "I LOVE sedation!" I was surprised and amused! There's nothing to it. You can even tell the staff "I don't wanna know a thing," and you won't, if you ask. I felt such a LACK of STRESS for the next few hours. I did not feel out of control, or that I wasn't myself, or loopy, or dizzy, or anything but GOOD and CAREFREE. I have since had procedures, and the peacefulness afterwards is a great side effect.
 

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FWIW, my experience with IV sedation for oral surgery was that I had no memory of the event at all. I don't recall the medications given, but one was to relax, one was to create a 'twilight sedation', and a third to cause amnesia for the event. The Dr. told me that I would have to be conscious enough to respond to his commands (open mouth wider, turn head, etc) but I was also given enough medication to prevent pain during surgery. The best medication in my opinion is the one that causes amnesia for the event. I was talking to the nurse one moment, and the next moment I was 'waking up again' from the surgery, with no memory of even going under. I walked to recovery and stayed there for about an hour and was allowed to go home.

As for general surgery with a regular anesthesiologist, same thing. I don't know what combination of drugs was used, but from the time the anesthesiologist put the medication into the i.v. on the back of my hand until the time when the amnesia started was less than two minutes. And it was odd, I did not feel the drugs 'coming on' or beginning to affect me. I did not feel intoxicated or loopy. I simply was conscious, and then I was not. And then I was waking up in the recovery room. No memory for the event. However, after the general anesthesia, I have no memory of most of the remaining day after the surgery. I was up and talking and drinking soda, responding to the nurses, talking with my family, but I have only a few memories of the rest of that day. One of the drugs for the general anesthesia caused this.

Even if a person had pain while undergoing a procedure, with the drug I was given, you would not even recall you had experienced pain. There is simply no memory of anything.

I was once very afraid of anesthesia, or of dying while under anesthesia. I can now say I have no fear of it, and if I were to die while anesthetized, I don't think it would necessarily be a bad thing.
 
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