It's Butchering Time

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by AndreaNZ, Jan 6, 2005.

  1. AndreaNZ

    AndreaNZ Well-Known Member

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    Hi, all -- we're getting our first two freezer piggies done by the home kill butcher next week. We don't want to waste anything usable, but also don't really know how big to make an offal pit. We can cook up and feed to the chooks much of the offal, but what is is no-no as far as usability (or feedability to either chooks or dogs or cats - knowing, of course, that all the pork must be cooked before being fed or eaten). What will be left over?

    Looking forward to all that yummy bacon, ham, chops, roasts.....drool drool drool...... :D

    Cheers
    Andrea
    NZ
     
  2. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi Andrea,

    Much depends on how much of it you are going to use. They reckon the only thing that should be wasted on a pig is it's squeal but I doubt you'll be wanting to make brushes out of it's bristles :haha:

    If you keep the head for brawn, the trotters, kidneys, livers and hearts you can safely look at filling a 60lt drum with the remainder which should give you some idea of what size hole to dig.

    If you don't want the livers, hearts and kidney's they are fine for the cats and dogs. However, unless you have 100 chooks, I would suggest you bury the rest of it. There is much that the chooks won't/can't eat and you will end up with a stinking mess that will attract flies, cats, dogs and rats.

    Happy eating - and if you don't want the trotters, send them my way. The best part of the pig.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     

  3. AndreaNZ

    AndreaNZ Well-Known Member

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    Hey, Ronnie - didn't know you checked in here! :worship: :D

    We actually have 100+ chooks, so I think they'll manage to finish off what's left. So, in other words, there is nothing they won't eat? Even the large intestine??

    What do you do with the trotters? I was planning on giving them to the dogs to chew on... The hocks I want to have smoked, because I use them to flavour bean and meat stews, and they make a wonderful flavour enhancer for chili.

    Also, what is brawn? What else can be done with the head? I've read that the jowl meat is useful, but for what I can't remember.

    Cheers!
    Andrea
    NZ
     
  4. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi Andrea,

    I'm the proverbial bad penny - I keep turning up everywhere :D

    I've delayed replying because I was going to look out some brawn recipes for you but I still haven't done it. Typical. If you would like them let me know.
    Despite owning pigs for as many years as I have, I have never made brawn but basically it is a jellied meat made by boiling the head, taking all the meat off it, adding spices and seasonings, gelatine and some of the cooking liquid and then leaving to set. It is excellent on sandwiches, with a salad or to serve with drinks. If you don't want to do that, the meat is good for pork pieces.

    I prefer to have the trotters pickled although many people don't. Because I'm the only one in the family who will eat them, I put them on to simmer about 8 in the morning and leave them cook for 4 or 5 hours. Then I sit in the sun with a good book, surrounded by cats, eating this lovely gelatinous mess and that's lunch. I was brought up with trotters but many people are put off eating pigs feet. Their loss, my gain :) Which reminds me, if you haven't already thought about it, get some pickled pork done. Very nice.

    I didn't actually know you had a 100 chooks. That made me feel a bit silly :eek:
    I feel you may find that there will be parts of the gut that the chooks won't clean up or it's going to take a week or so to do so by which time it will be getting more than a little ponky so be prepared to clean up what they don't eat. The other way around it would be to cook it first and that would just about guarantee they would eat the lot. If you emptied the paunch and cooked it, you could also feed it to the dogs. I used to do that with mutton guts.

    Let us know how it goes.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  5. BobK

    BobK Well-Known Member

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    Well outside of the meat cuts for us we take the kidneys, liver, heart, tongue, and pancreas and grind them after the sausage is finished. This is mixed with copious amounts of flour and water, baked, then cut into cubes and dried......we call them gut cookies and the dogs love them. They last for a long long time provided that you get them really dry. Only thing we bury are bones, head, feet, and hide...not much really. I cooking with those heads get that bullet out...lead poisoning is a real issue!
     
  6. AndreaNZ

    AndreaNZ Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, everyone! I would like the brawn recipe(s), Ronnie, as that was something I grew up with with a German grandmother (yummy stuff from the German delicatessen down the road...). Not sure if I'll try it this time, but as our Kunes approach breeding age, I look forward to experimenting!

    So, it sounds like nothing gets wasted and the chooks are in for a lovely treat (think I'm going to cook and freeze some of it, though, to feed after they've finished the first bit).

    Cheers!
    Andrea
    NZ
     
  7. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    I bake the head for the dog. No lead poisoning if there's an exit wound. You must be using a 22. I go a little heavier


     
  8. BobK

    BobK Well-Known Member

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    When we first started out I used 38 loads but I felt they "killed" the hog too quick for a good bleed. We now use 22 longs and have been very satisfied with the result...yes no exit wound! Do not try to use 22 shorts...just gives them a headache and makes for a very messy killing.
     
  9. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Staff Member Supporter

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    Anything we don't eat goes to the (LGD) dogs. There is no waste - They'll eat anything. They guard and herd the pigs and get their share at slaughter time.

    -Walter
    in Vermont
     
  10. AndreaNZ

    AndreaNZ Well-Known Member

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    Hi, all -- well, deed is done, and we were all surprised how fast, clean and ungruesome it was. Most of the offal I've cooked up for the dogs, but the intestines, NO ONE would eat, not even the chooks. So I had to bury those. The heads are still sitting out there on a stump, and I'm going to cook one for us and one for the chooks.

    Thanks everyone for your advice!

    Cheers
    Andrea
    NZ
     
  11. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    I had to look up chooks :) imagined them as birds of prey :rolleyes: it is a cute name for chickens. Not sure exactly what offal is considered either :rolleyes: LOL, I have lived a starnge life I guess. Here are a few things you can do. I know this is late for this time Andrea but you can clean out the small intestine to use for your own casings if you make sausage. Withold food for 24 hours prior to slaughter and the deed isn't gross. I was astounded by how easy it is- now we always keep several vaccum-packed bags of frozen casings. One less thing to buy. :cool: Blood can be collected and simmered in seasonings, then used to stuff casings to make blood sausage (aka morcillas). Very good :yeeha: Also the heart can be sliced into strips and marinaded in worcestirshire and beer with a little seasoning of one's choice and then slightly fried with onions and green peppers. It makes a tasty treat in a hot dog bun. I have a recipe for pig's feet in garbanzo beans I can look up- don't make it often. The ears and tail (after scalding of course) become crispy over a slow fire. There is a stew called gandinga (in Spanish) which renders the lungs, [that long red flat thing I keep forgetting the name of], the kidneys, the liver, and the heart into a delicious stew over white rice. I can look up the recipes to some of this if anyone is interested.