Is This Fired Wood Sesoned

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by big rockpile, Dec 10, 2004.

  1. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    I have bunch of trees cut last before leaves come on.Cutting it up for wood.Wife says its not seasoned.

    Bark is falling off I say it is good to go.What do you guys think?

    big rockpile
     
  2. Depends on what your definition of season is? Some rip-off artist around here say it means it was cut last fall season and it is now winter season. So therefor it is seasoned.

    To me it means that it was cut last fall/winter and is ready this fall/winter.

    I have been know to do a quick seasoning by stacking a few split logs on top of the wood stove while it has a hot fire in it. I only do this while I am at home to keep a eye on it.
     

  3. Gayle in KY

    Gayle in KY Gadabout

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    I vote with Tina on this one.
     
  4. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    Id call it seasoned enough. :D
     
  5. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    My first year out here I bought 'seasoned wood' that was cut in the summer, well I had my first chimney fire that year as well. Now I only use wood that has been cut for at least one year. NO MORE GREEN WOOD for me. Just my 2 cents.
     
  6. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    depends realy on the wood. ash can cut and burn no proglem . box elder needs about three years!if it sizzles and spits in the stove then maybe not so ready. was it split and stacked under a tarp? near dead when cut?what ever wood you use keep an eye on your chimeny as some soot up even when ya burn very dry wood. hot fast fires are best but not always practicalble
     
  7. Mandy

    Mandy Well-Known Member

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    Just an intersting bit of info if it is Ash you can cut it off the stump today, split it and sell it for seasoned fire wood today. At least around here, the natural moisture level in Ash is lower then what the "regulations" are for firewood. Although I should hope asnyone selling it wouldn't do that. But you would be amazed what people get away with when they sell firewood.

    I agree with R.H. if you have some firewood stand it next to your wood stove and that will help dry it out a bit.
     
  8. doc623

    doc623 Well-Known Member

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    I agree depends on the wood.
    Ususally 6-12 months is good.
    If the bark is coming off is a good indication.
    Another indication of seasoning is checking or splits in the end of a cut piece.
    Also any cracks or splits along the length of the piece.
    Usually store wood under cover and inside that which will be burned the next week or month with heat in the house if possible.
    You can also tell when burned.
    andother .02 worth.
     
  9. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    Get comfy and request her to bring some seasoned wood for the fire and see how it looks.

    mikell
     
  10. tooltime

    tooltime Border Ruffian

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    Ford Major, We call box elder "cold smoke." I hate those trees, always cutting them out of fence lines. We push and stack it up in a brush pile and it burns hard even after a year.

    Mikell, Do you think if he did that he might get a piece of stove wood upside the head?
     
  11. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    Well its mostly Oak.We just cut the trees down left them lay,until now.I think the wife is going more on how solid and heavy it is.

    Far as Flue fires my Flue goes about 12 foot straight up from the stove.The only problem I ever have is the screen on the cap,then just brush it off.

    big rockpile
     
  12. Mandy

    Mandy Well-Known Member

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    Oak is one of those types of woods that takes forever to dry out... we had oak that had been off the stump for close to three years, it was still in tree length and it was pretty much just as green as when it came of the stump. That is why I hate oak, looks great standing, looks great on the back of a log truck, sucks to dry it out! :rolleyes:
     
  13. RenieB

    RenieB Well-Known Member

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    Green wood will not have many cracks on the end. Real good dry wood will have a lot of cracks and will really have a dry look. We usually order our wood in the Spring and it will be well dried for the winter some prefer it aged longer but we have not had any problems.

    RenieB
     
  14. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    we use box elder on warm days . seems ya need to let it sit for three years before it burns good! have been cutting and spraying it off our ground for years .carvers pay big money for the tight grain and red sap wood. if that oak aint been split and under a clear tarp would say its likly too wet .real test is how good it burns ! had a chunk of oak by the fire for 5 years now waiting on the resident carver to create !was too wet for a couple of years! even straight up you can get soot forming ,even the outdoor wood stoves soot up! still seeing the crap that gets burnt in them no wonder!
     
  15. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

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    Since my chimney tends to build up creosote and have fires, I
    buy my wood in the spring for the burning season one and a half years
    from then. Even then, I need to clean the chimney every three
    weeks. A drag, but safer for my situation.
    Ann
     
  16. deberosa

    deberosa SW Virginia Gourd Farmer!

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    I think it may be too green also. I had 5 trees downed last spring. Some got bucked up then, others laid in one piece until a week ago. They were fir and cedar. The logs that were bucked in spring might be ready, they did have cracks and the chimney sweep told me I could use them, but I don't feel comfortable with that. The ones that were left as logs are not seasoned at all. I'll wait until next winter to use them.
     
  17. reluctantpatriot

    reluctantpatriot I am good without god.

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    I like to mix green and seasoned wood together in my outdoor wood furnace because it helps extend the burn time. With seasoned wood I get some heat, but I have to keep feeding it every few hours. When I have some green wood mixed in with the hot buring seasoned wood, I can extend the burn time and have lots of good coals for the morning after an overnight burn.

    Most of what I burn is white oak, though I do have some other species mixed in, usually cedar. The one tree I will not burn in a wood furnace again, unless it is only one split or small unsplit piece, is hedge/osage orange/bois d'arc. My uncle in Kansas just about took my head off when I was staying with him for awhile and was living in the basement of his house. I was responsible for keeping the homemade water jacketed wood furnace going in the winter. As I had never burned hedgerow hedgewood in a stove, I thought it as just like oak and I filled the four foot by 3 foot firebox full up. A few hours later, after I came back in from doing something outside to help, he cussed up a storm and told me he had to pull out the buring wood and hose it down on the concrete basement floor. I had made the heavy steel plate furnace turn a bright cherry red from the hot hedge fire, despite it having a thick water jacket. And that was green hedge. I could have melted down the furnace with seasoned hedge.

    Back to the topic. If the bark is falling off, it is well seasoned. Much beyond that and you start getting decaying wood that will burn even faster but not have much usable life in it for a good fire. Oak will be heavy even when seasoned until it is rotting down and then it gets light from being swiss cheesed by insects.
     
  18. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If the bark is falling off, it is likely 'seasoned'. Big deal.

    If it's oak it needs to be cut & split to size & let it dry some more. Rarely is it dry enough if it was left whole. If you can store it somewhere dry but air curculates by it, another 2 months or so will make it good fire wood - after it is cut down to size.

    --->Paul
     
  19. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    toss one in the stove... if it burns; its dry.
    if it smokes; its not dry
    if it smokes a bit then burns poorly; its almost dry but not quite yet.

    try coal... even wet it burns if the coals are hot hot hot
     
  20. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    I agree with Paul. Dead oak logs, lying on the ground, will not "season" as full logs no matter how long they're on the ground. Oak, even dead oak, needs to be cut and split to fully season. I dry my dead oak for one year and green oak for two years...as cut and split pieces.