Is this craftsman tiller a good one?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Mountaineer, Nov 16, 2006.

  1. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    I asked awhile back about tillers, and had some good tips. I really liked Macybaby's description of her 7HP craftsman. The closest I can find is this 6.5 HP. Hers had both counter and forward rotation, this one only mentions counter.
    And there is no mention of there being a neutral on it. It sounded like a handy feature. It'll be used, but is supposed to have less than 1 hour on it.
    I attached the info sheet from Sears below. I'd love to hear any ideas here. I've going all the way to the city Thursday and will be looking at the tiller, I should have asked this earlier!!!
    Thanks!
    (I'll try and post a link here, the 7HP is definately top of the line(not available in Canada GRR!!), and the 6.5 HP is what I'm looking at, hope the link works!)

    http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/sear...N&keyword=tillers&gobutton.x=20&gobutton.y=14


    CRAFTSMANTM 6.5-hp Rear-tine Tiller



    Sears Value
    Priced right everyday
    Good quality, basic everyday merchandise
    counter-rotating tines recommended for use in gardens with hard soil
    17" wide till path
    7-position stake-height adjustment
    shift lever
    18 1/2" wide tine shield
    adjustable side panels help prevent tilled soil from migrating outside till path
    large 13 x 5 x 6 wheels
    only at Sears
    dependable Briggs & Stratton 'Intek' single-cylinder engine
    cast-iron cylinder with overhead valve for cooler running
    suitable for use in small and medium-sized garden plots
    safety clutch
    reverse
    adjustable handle
    2-year warranty (details with purchase)
     
  2. Herb

    Herb Well-Known Member

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    I have one (except mine is green, like the 7 HP). It does have forward, reverse and nuetral. It also has the counter-rotating tines and an adjustable tiling depth. I like it alot as I was using a front tine tiller before (for more than it was designed for I might add). Breaking new ground in a single pass is a little unrealsitic, especially if it is a grassy area. Also if I try and force the tiller forward, it will beat the snot out of me. However, if I let it crawl along at it's own pace (no matter how slow I think it is), it will do a better job.
    Overall I am extermely pleased with this model tiller. It does everything I ask it to do.
     

  3. bargarguy

    bargarguy Well-Known Member

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    Jun 22, 2006
    I have a huskee 8 horse that sounds very similar to Herbs, I have broken some of the toughest "new" ground in Ohio with it. The key is to run the tines in reverse and go very slowly when breaking new ground. Remember rocks are the enemy,many a drive train has been busted up by seizing one too many rocks the tines.
    Most new units have the reverse tine function, but if by chance you run across one that doesn't then by all means do not purchase it. Unless your soil is very loose and sandy forward rotating tines will walk away from a full grown man.
    I would think all new models have a neutral of some kind. If your serious about your tilling then a good walk behind is a must.
    Mid tine units are not that great from what I hear, although I haven't run one myself.
     
  4. Macybaby

    Macybaby I love South Dakota Supporter

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    I just used mine again this fall, I would highly recomend NOT getting one with just counter. I found that once the ground was really worked up (that happens real fast in counter mode) it is too soft, the wheels can not get enough traction in the soft soil to offset the drag from the counter rotating tines. But put it on forward and it is wonderful.

    Here is my garden before the fall tilling. It was pretty hard by this time

    [​IMG]

    And here is is after tilling. I was able to put one hand on the tiller, and walk off to the side while it did the work - Just like the Troybilt commercials show. Never could do that with my Troybilt, but then I bought one after MDT ruined them.

    [​IMG]

    I am so happy with this craftsman, mostly because I had dreamed for years of having a troybilt, then bought one and it was one of the biggest disapointments in my life. Had I known that MDT bought them right before that, I would not have got one. Nowdays it's getting hard not to end up with something that MDT has bought out, but still produces under the original name.

    The things I love are the counter and forward selectable rotation, and the ability to put the machine in neutral to move it. My troybilt has cotter pins on the wheels that have to be moved in order for it to free wheel, whether it is running or not.

    So, now I have three tillers in my garden shed. Two I love, and one I would feel guilty of selling because I consider it such a rotten machine.

    Cathy
     
  5. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Herb and Barbarbuy. Very good points to consider which I'll use later today.
    And thanks Cathy for again coming through. And the proof pics!!! That's the one I want! I'm going to try the beast out at his place and make sure it's what I need. I don't have time for crap or substandard tilling, it's gotta be beautiful like your garden there.
     
  6. bargarguy

    bargarguy Well-Known Member

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    Macy
    I have to agree you do need to be able rotate the tines either direction, but not having the reverse renders it seriously inefficient when breaking a large amount of new ground, basically what I was trying to say was the same as you said, you really need both directions. Nice looking garden, I am going to break some new ground this week, weather permitiing of course.
     
  7. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    GRRRRRR!!!!

    The first 6.5HP Craftsman I looked at actually rotated FWD and backward, but was falling to pieces so I walked away from it.
    The second one was the same 6.5 HP, but a year older (PERFECT CONDITION) but...... for some reason it didn't till reverse, AARRGGHH!!!
    Maybe I'll try and buy new, it's worth it for me.
    Thanks again for everyone's help- I would have certainly bought the second one if it hadn't been for you guys!!!
     
  8. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    I bought the MDT 5 HP rear tiller, and I burned out the transmission. The one part that is not covered by the warantee.

    this last summer, I bought the Sears 6.5 HP rear tiller, and I bought the extra warantee. It is fairly powerful, but I strip the pins about every ten paces.