Is this a good pair?......

Discussion in 'Goats' started by monarchcmj, Jan 20, 2005.

  1. monarchcmj

    monarchcmj Well-Known Member

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    I am hoping to get two goats in the spring. After fighting with the town on where our property boundaries are, I think we finally have everything settled so we can build a small barn and pen off the back of a garage my husband is going to build.
    I was thinking I'd like to get a wether and a doe; is that a good pair? I would like to have the option of breeding my doe at some point, but do not want a buck here full time, and I know goats are herd animals, so thought I'd get her a wether for a "mate". Any thoughts? Thanks!
    Christy
     
  2. Lt. Wombat

    Lt. Wombat Well-Known Member

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    If you can afford 2 does it might be a better investment. Besides nothing sounds more lovely in the middle of the night when you're trying to sleep than 2 Nubians cycling :haha:
     

  3. monarchcmj

    monarchcmj Well-Known Member

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    A better investment? Can you elaborate?, lol. I'm new to the whole goat scene and can use all the help I can get ;) Thanks!
    Christy
     
  4. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    the does will give you kids and milk. the wether is only eating :rolleyes:
    even if you put him in the freezer someday,wich is probably not a beginners choice, he has eaten more than the meat is worth. does that makes sense?
    other option, you keep the wether as a companion for a buck you'll have in the future?
    susanne
     
  5. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My goats are pets. Being brand new to goats, I got 3, just in case...........you know, in case something bad happened, that way I wouldn't be left with only one :rolleyes: . Now I have 4, and things are great.
     
  6. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    If you're just looking for pets, the wether will be a great friend for your doe. If you're looking for these critters to be sulf-sufficient, then 2 does would probably be a better choice.

    Temperment wise, I have found wethers to be every bit as sweet and tame as does are. They're also really handy for hauling all your stuff into the backcountry when you go backpacking :).
     
  7. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Trust me on this :haha: Nobody ever, unless they turn out to be diseased, and then they are usually put into a seperate pasture quaranteend for life, ever ever never get rid of their original goats...so don't go buying a wether who is an eating machine, and is never going to go in the freezer!

    Get a doe with her baby doe nursing this spring, or two weaned kids, at least 4 or 5 months old, and buy yourself a goat weigh tape from jefferspet.com and take it with you. Full size dairy goats should wiegh their months old plus their birthweight. So a 4 month old doe should be 40 pounds plus her birth weigh, say 8 pounds, or 48 pounds, a 5 month old doe 58 pounds, if not at those weights by 2 or 3 pounds, turn around and run...they likely are stunted from cocci, worms, or not enough groceries.

    Ask about CAE and CL, do not buy a goat until you know what both of those are. Do not buy a milking doe if you are not going to go home and milk her. If you are going to let kids nurse, than buy a doe who nurses her kids. If you are not going to grain your goats and expect them to eat only what is in the pasture, than buy goats that come from a farm that does it like that also. If you never want milk from the does, or just want some to play with than think about getting meat cross goats instead of dairy goats, or better yet, pygmy's, kinders or nigerians.

    Never by a goat because you feel sorry for it and want to 'rescue it', never buy a goat because it is spotted. And if at all possible find someone who has goats and buy them lunch to go with you to buy your goat, someone who has no vested interest in what you are buying or even knows the person you are buying from.

    Read the forum and learn about goats before you make the worst mistake of your life. Diseased goats are rampant out there, and folks are just waiting for the phone call that someone is looking for a nanny or billy.

    Good luck with this, and ask tons of questions. Vicki
     
  8. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    Vicki, Kinders are good little milk goats, not just pets like pygmies. They don't give as much milk as the big breeds, but plenty for most households. And the kids make better meat goats than most straight dairy breeds.

    Kathleen
     
  9. monarchcmj

    monarchcmj Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the reponses! I am looking for pets, not meat, and not necessarily milk, unless I decide to have any doe I get, bred at some point.
    I have also not yet decided which breed to get.... the people who raise pygmies say pygmies are the best, the people who raise Nubians say they're best, etc. etc., etc., LOL! So, I am quite undecided there. But, I do know someone who will have Nubian kids in the spring and may go that route.
    Thanks again for the responses; I appreciate them :)
    Christy
     
  10. 65284

    65284 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I guess I am a little confused about this, are you outside of the city boundries?
    Unless you are inside of the city boundries why would/how could they have anything to say about it? If your property, or at least the portion of the property where the goats are to be kept, was outside you should have told the city officials to osculate your posterior and did as you damn well pleased.
     
  11. monarchcmj

    monarchcmj Well-Known Member

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    No, it's not town boundaries we're having trouble with.
    To make a long story short.. when the land was surveyed for the road we live on back in 1964, and lots were placed, the surveying was done completely incorrectly. Basically, a guy in Massachussetts was given a rough drawing of the road and he drew in lots where he thought they'd actually be. Well, because he had never physically been here, his drawings were, and are, WAY off. So, according to the town, our entire house is not even in a "legal" spot; it's supposedly built in the setback area so we cannot alter our property in any way until we get a certified plan from a surveyor. We have a certified plan for the garage/barn finally, but we also have foundation poured for an addition we started last spring that we still can't do a darn thing with. It's a BIG mess and I can't wait until this is over and done with.
    Christy
     
  12. JoyKelley

    JoyKelley Well-Known Member

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    I am also a newbie on goats and I agree withthe post that you wont ever get rid of your first goats, getting a pregnant doe isn't a safe guard against wethers tho' I bought 2 pregnant Nubians, one had a boy and girl and one had 3 boys and one girl, all the boys were all neutered and will live out their lives in luxury around here eating eating eating, playin, eating eating, getting their head stuck in fence, eating eating ,

    In all seriousness, can I train these guys to go with me like dogs and take them out of our field and out into the woods to munch and I would stay with them, but will they go off without me ?

    another serious question, womeone mentioned the girls cycling? how often will they come into season, and how long does it last and does it change their personality any
     
  13. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Actually, our first goat, Misty, ended up being shipped. lol At one point dad said anything outside of the fence goes..which included a couple of wethers, a buck, and some does including our first goat, Misty. Of course, Misty had already ruined her chances by starving our only purebred (a gorgeous Nubian). We have a beautiful daughter and two granddaughters out of her though. Her line is still int he ehrd adn tehy do wonderfully, but she was shipped after two years. :rolleyes:
     
  14. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    I have trained both of my goats to stay with me when we go for walks. Start out by having them on leads (dog leashes work fine) and have lots of treats with you. Goats learn simple commands, and as long as they've bonded with you they won't go far away from you...Unless something really freakes them out, and then they just head for the barn. I keep sunflower seeds in my pocket so I can immediately reward good behavior.
     
  15. Shahbazin

    Shahbazin Well-Known Member

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    If you're not sure about milking, what about a fleece goat like an Angora or a Pygora? I have a nice Angora wether who is quite charming, & he produces lovely shaded silver grey fleece twice a year. I just use hand shears (or you can even use scissors) to shear, so it's not a big deal. Here's Griffin, with two Shetland sheep buddies.
    [​IMG]
     
  16. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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  17. Dee

    Dee Well-Known Member

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    I got rid of one of my orginal goats only because she was such a witch to the other goats. They were all her daughters and grand-daughters. Now we have peace and harmony within the family.

    By the way, she was bottle fed and the breeder said most bottle fed goats act like that. I have one bottle fed doe that really doesn't know how to behave around the other goats.
     
  18. monarchcmj

    monarchcmj Well-Known Member

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    There is a petting farm near me that has Pygora kids every summer. I asked if they keep the kids or sell them and the owner told me they place the kids with good families. So, if I decide to go the Pygora route, I know where to get them :)
    Thanks for your help :)
    Christy
     
  19. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    Have to agree with Vicki; get 2 does. You can always breed them. It is very expensive to feed goats and get nothing in return. At least in our area feed is high. Alfalfa pellets are $12 for 80 lbs; grain is $9 for 40 lbs(12% protein); and hay is $7 a bale in season. If you want lots of milk, get a Saanen. We do prefer Alpines as they are in between the volume/butterfat ratio and I personally like getting different color variations. They can be very tempermental though. I like LaManchas but DH doesn't like the ears.