Is this a good deal? (work for heiffer)

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by RyleeM, Feb 4, 2005.

  1. RyleeM

    RyleeM Active Member

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    Nebraska
    Hi,

    The lady who I got my new milk cow from =), also has a yearling jersey/guernsey cross heiffer. She is quite small... and she expectes her to be a smaller cow even when she is grown. I would have to say that she takes after the guernsey more than anything. Well, I am paying cash for the Brown Swiss when we pick her up, but she mentioned doing a trade and having her 2 yr old quarter horse broke. She wants $500 cash for the heiffer or will trade. I have though about this all week. I was thinking that I could put 30 rides on the colt, not 30 days as you can't get 30 rides in. I would feed the colt and keep him at my place, I would venture about 45 days. I will start him using Natural Horseman-ship methods. I have a great deal of experience with horses, my latest being an assistant to a cutting horse trainer.

    The way I look at it is this - I wouldn't pay cash for the heiffer as I don't NEED her and paid for the first one. If I trade for her, I am gaining something by doing something that I enjoy, and will have a nice heiffer when I am done.

    Do you all think that this would be worth it? I can breed her later and keep her around if I like her, or sell her as a family milk cow for $1000....

    ???
     
  2. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If the hores don't put you in the hospital, you'll have a very cheap heifer.
     

  3. RyleeM

    RyleeM Active Member

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    I don't know why he would.... I had a horse dislocated both of my hips and complete turned one of my vertebrae, while pushing two together. I walked funny for a few months, but now I pop my hips and back daily and stretch. I learned which ways the chiro was popping me, and quit going due to costs. And my husband will be helping me out if I need it.
     
  4. RyleeM

    RyleeM Active Member

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    Nebraska
    I am also hoping that if I do as good of job as I think I can, that this will get me other training jobs in the area... Hopefully.
     
  5. wr

    wr Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Seems to me that you aren't winning on the deal. Thirty rides would put you at worth about $15/ride with the balance going toward ground time and feed. A friend of mine is charging $400/month plus feed and no more than three rides a week and he's booked up a year in advance so there's no shortage of takers. I would think it might be worth your while to sell your services and buy the heifer if that's what you want. I've been involved in too many trade for services deals and it always seems that somebody is dissatisfied in the end. Perhaps in this case, it might be the cow owner, are you sure she's very clear on what she'll be getting at the end of 30 rides? She may be expecting a finished and schooled horse.
     
  6. JanO

    JanO Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think I'd find out exactly how much training she expects. Does she just want him started, or finished too? Is it realistic for you to accomplish what she expects in the time you've determinded to put into him? Also think about how it would work into your schedule, would the heifer really be worth it?, and what are your real chances of getting further jobs from this one? If you can justify it, go for it. If you do decide to do it, put the whole thing in writting. You want to protect yourself in case she's unhappy with the end result. Otherwise, ask her to pay you outright for your services, then buy the hiefer anyway if you still want her. It's the long way around it, but at least everybody would be on the same page in the deal.

    Good luck.
     
  7. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    If the heifer is small...does that mean runty, unthrifty, doesn't thrive, doesn't grow? If any of the above, she's not worth $500. I've had calves like that...they just don't grow and look half their age. Worthless beasts that got shipped out of here as fast as possible (along with their mothers).

    If she's too small there are liable to be problems calving.

    Don't "pay" more than this animal is worth, no matter how you do it.

    Jena
     
  8. milkstoolcowboy

    milkstoolcowboy Farmer

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    I'll let the horse people tackle whether $500 is good for breaking a horse.

    If you don't need another dairy heifer, then it's not a good deal. I take it she's open, so even if you breed her back and sell her as a springer, you'll have a few months worth of feed in her.

    It's hard to judge whether an animal is a good buy unless you can see her. From what you've described, she doesn't sound like much to write home about. Is there much of a market for family cows in your area? I thought homesteaders usually wanted to buy cows that had been milked previously if you're going to be milking her by hand with minimum facilities.