Is there a good,cheap,supermarket coffee?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by mightybooboo, Aug 30, 2004.

  1. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Seems my good ole Folgers has really gone downhill.Other than the grind your own(good but pricey) can anyone recommend a good 3 lb. canned type coffee that they like?And pretty much nationally available?
    BooBoo
     
  2. coalroadcabin

    coalroadcabin Well-Known Member

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    I use WallyWorld's 100% Arabica coffee. It tastes pretty good and it's less than $4 for a great big can.
     

  3. Timedess

    Timedess Guest

    if you have an aldi's close by, give their coffee a try. it's pretty good, according to my dh.

    timedess
     
  4. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

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    Maxwell House has a fantastic French Roast. I believe the name is Premium Cup or something like that. It comes packaged in a bag like higher end stuff (the French Roast has pink on the bag) and it's about $4-5 a pound. It's cheaper than the better coffees but it tastes wonderful.

    Chock Full o' Nuts French Roast was rated among the top french roasts in an America's Test Kitchen taste test. It's cheap and very good as well.
     
  5. cloverfarm

    cloverfarm Well-Known Member

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    We've tried all different kinds and since our well water adds its own taste to the mix, we like Yuban 100 percent Colombian the best. Its in teh same area as Folger's and Maxwell house.
     
  6. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Try MJB Hawaiian Blend, yes in a can. When I was looking this was rated highly, comparable to whole bean coffees sold at much higher price, but alas not available in my region. Apparently mostly available on the coasts. (We here in hinterlands just get offered ground up tree bark in a can cause we is stupid and dont deserve better.)

    Otherwise EightO'Clock is good enough. Wally World sells something called Rio Cafe only in a 2 pound can. I tried it. Its not horrible and its really cheap. Aldis Beaumont Gold ground coffee sold in bag is like $1.99 for 12 oz. It has some halfway decent flavor, not horrible anyhow. Little on bitter side. Might even try various national supermarket store brands in your area. I've heard some can be ok. Just if store changes suppliers to make more profit, quality may vary.

    Remember most canned coffees anymore are a blend of robusta, arabica, and unspecified filler (FDA doesnt require them to even mention the fillers, dont we just love lobbyists). Robusta beans are far cheaper than Arabica beans, but much less taste. The higher the price, the more arabica or at least we hope. Folgers whole beans in the little bag (without the artificial flavorings) make cup a coffee that tastes like the canned Folgers of yesteryear. Lot more expensive than the canned though. Can we all say more filler and more robusta in the canned version, despite label still saying 100% arabica.

    And if you are willing to do your own roasting, you can get whole green coffee beans well within price range of name brand canned coffees. One place I recently ran across sells some as cheap as $1.95 a pound if you buy 50# at time. They say shipping is depends on your address and exactly what ups charges them. No handling charges, no shipping mark up. Price depends lot on quantity of green coffee beans you buy and where you buy them. Try ebay. Good deals on green coffee on there from time to time. Watch out for shipping charges, these can vary widely. If you were wholesaler, you could buy cheap decent coffee beans for whole lot less per pound than any consumer will ever pay. All the middlemen grabbing their bit of profit make it expensive. I'll never go back to canned coffees at least as they are offered today. Just give up coffee if I cant get quality I want or cant afford the quality I want.
     
  7. FolioMark

    FolioMark In Remembrance

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    We always liked good old Chock Full o Nuts brand especially the French Roast. That stuff can stand up and walk off with the pot. :p
     
  8. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Folgers,eh? :rolleyes:

    Wow,lots of good advice,Im going to print this list when it runs its course and check em out. :)
    BooBoo
     
  9. Gercarson

    Gercarson Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Aldi's does have a good coffee. I love coffee and have found (like others) that Wal-Mart's own brand of 100% Columbian coffee to be superior to the big name brands and equal to Yuban.
     
  10. michelleIL

    michelleIL tryna be His

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    Thanks for the tip. I'll have to try that. I"m in love with columbian, and as far as the fillers are concerned, I really could care less, as long as I get my buzz and get a great flavor. Otherwise I won't mess with them!
    HH!!!
    Michelle
     
  11. nappy

    nappy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    HermitJohn,

    I'd be most interested in how you roast the green coffee beans. Could you give details? Being of Scandinavian descent, I appreciate full flavored "real" coffee. I once really liked Chockful of Nuts but now use only Eight o'Clock arabica whole bean coffee. Sometimes I think there are changes in the quality of this brand too. I definitely do not like decaf, flavored, or expresso coffees. In years past we hosted exchange kids from Finland who brought us some of their premium Finnish coffee. This was arabica bean coffee but the way it was processed must have made the difference. Those memories of delicious coffee.......hmmmm.

    Nappy
     
  12. Timedess

    Timedess Guest

    yes, PLEASE tell how you roast the coffee beans yourself! and- WHERE to get the green beans???????

    Thanks SOO much! my dh would be ever-so-grateful!

    Timedess
     
  13. ozarkin'it

    ozarkin'it Well-Known Member

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    ive always really hated folgers. try kroger brand breakfast blend
     
  14. Nancy

    Nancy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have tried Aldi's and really did not like it. I lean toward the French roast of most types because it has more flavor. I too noticed that Folgers has lost it's taste. Even the last Wally world brand of !00 percent Arabica was not good.
    I'm going to try of few of these new suggestions.
     
  15. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Do they even make three pound coffee cans anymore?

    Why settle for second best. I order my coffee on-line from Montana Coffee Traders. They have a vast variety of coffee they roast and it is roasted the same day you order it. You can get it either whole bean or they'll grind it to your specs for no extra charge.

    It's all coffee, no fillers.

    I order it wholesale through my business name and it usually runs between five and six dollars a pound.

    Wholesale orders do require a minimum order of five pounds.
     
  16. 12vman

    12vman Offgridkindaguy

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    I usually purchase Chase and Sanborn - Special Roast. It's a common brand around here and I like it better than Maxwell House. My second choice is Chock-full-o-Nuts.

    If you want a change in flavor of any brand of coffee, try "Hobo Coffee"

    Measure your water with a cup and add as many cups as you want to make in a sauce pan, add 1 tsp(heaping) for each cup of water you put into the pan. Bring to a boil and shut it off. Let it set a few minutes and the gounds will settle to the bottom of the pan. Pour the coffee off slowly so not to get any of the grounds in your cup. (Always make 1 cup extra for you will lose some at the end because of the grounds thing)

    All of the natural oils stay in the coffee that the filter pulls from it...

    Try it... ;) You'll like it...
     
  17. Torch

    Torch Well-Known Member

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    "Is there a good,cheap,supermarket coffee?"

    Umm... NO! :)
     
  18. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Somewhere on general chat there is an old coffee thread of my adventures in replacing my old beloved Folgers Breakfast Blend (before that known as Custom Roast) when quality went to that of ground tree bark in a plastic can. Greed wins in the end.

    In short though, I first tried small amounts of several kinds of coffee beans from www.sweetmarias.com Then not appreciating their high shipping charges, I turned to Ebay. The guy I bought from is gone. Just shop around on internet and compare to what coffee beans are selling for on ebay. Be sure to factor in shipping. There are a zillion places to buy green coffee beans. Expect large discount for ordering larger amounts of beans. If not, go elsewhere. Also watch out for gouging on shipping just like any mailorder place. Try to find an assortment to start with to find what varieties you prefer. There can be big differences.

    as to kind of beans, I highly recommend Malabar beans from India. Short of turning them into charcoal, you will get something with pungent earthy flavor that is also non-acid and smooth. In other words these are pretty much foolproof. I like Harrar beans (sun dried) from Ethiopia maybe best of all, but they take bit practice to get just right roast. And after roasting, you need to let the roasted Harrar beans age for a week before grinding and brewing, at least thats way I like them best. The Malabars can be used the next morning after roasting. Doesnt make as much difference with them. Be willing to experiment. And be aware with quality bean, you dont need to go for the dark french roasts. A city roast or full city roast is plenty. Unless you just really like that heavy oily charcoal flavor. Some people do. I wouldnt pay for highest quality beans if I were wanting to french roast them. The darker the roast the more bitterness and the less the variety matters also.

    As to how I roast, I am still using a small frypan on top of stove. Small cause I have to stand there continually shaking the skillet so they roast evenly. I have got it down to where I can do it pretty reliably. Can do it in two or three batches to get bit over pint of roasted beans. The more beans in the skillet the longer it takes to get them roasted. Either way takes about half hour to get little over a pint roasted beans. Now if you can continually shake a bigger skillet, you will get more done in same time. But if you have muscles to continually shake a big cast iron extended-family size chicken roaster fry pan for half hour, I dont want to arm wrestle you.

    I have seen various gadgets to roast beans, everything from old hot air popcorn poppers to fancy exotic electronic bean roasters. No idea about such. I just started out not wanting to spend extra money so stuck with the skillet. I have however seen various homemade coffee roasters from 19th and early 20th century for sale as rustic antiques on ebay. They are in drum roaster style. I have been thinking about building something like them as they can handle greater volume and easier on my arm to turn a crank than to shake a frypan. Guess some have carried this to an extreme and use an electric powered rotissare over an outside grill to roast beans. Experiment and its whatever works for you in terms of cost, convenience, and effort. If really cheap like me, a small cast iron skillet, or even a small stainless skillet will work with bit of practice. (I am having good luck with small stainless skillet right now, just keep it moving. Possibly could try a bigger stainless skillet???? although I dont own one)
     
  19. rwjedi

    rwjedi Member

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    There is a brand around here (Missouri) Called Thomas coffee that is REAL good. Not too expensive, but not Cheap either.
     
  20. shelbynteg

    shelbynteg Well-Known Member

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    I will buy any house brand of 100% Colombian coffee, and they are always good. Sprawlmart's big can is $3.97 (unbelievable!). Yuban is good, Kroger has a house brand in regular and decaf. I love the flavor of Colombian coffee, and have a well-honed addiction.