Is TBH suitable in my area?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping' started by tb1234, Jun 13, 2006.

  1. tb1234

    tb1234 Well-Known Member

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    I am fascinated by this meathod. I'd never seen this at all till looking at posts here today. Following some links, I skimmed over that it is better in mild climates. It gets very cold and snowy here in the winter, a couple weeks of a deep hard freeze, and then in the summer, sustained temps over 100 for a month or so. Do I need to squelch my desire to learn more on this meathod now? Or keep learning? :shrug:
     
  2. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper keeper of the bees Staff Member Supporter

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    Of course keep learning, it is never a good thing to squelch a desire with out knowing the answer. You would always carry in the back of your mind, would that have worked for me?????????????????

    Get some bees and try it even.

    :D Al
     

  3. Ed K

    Ed K Well-Known Member

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    I'm in western PA and we can have the extremes you spoke about. Typical advice around here with conventional equipment it that you should have two deep brood chambers for bees to over winter. However many experienced members of our bee club talk about bees surviving in a single brood chamber or nucs or in hives that tipped over or with covers lifted off.

    Based on that, I would assume that a TBH could make it in colder areas. It would also be easier to build a well insulated TBH than a conventional. I think you could make it work if you want to.

    Best Wishes
     
  4. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    I like my TBH's and intend to expand from the current 3 to 10 for next year. I was looking on a Polish web site and saw some fascinating designs for TBH's.

    The problem of keeping bees over the winter troubles me, as I have yet to meet or talk to anyone who winters bees up here. There are lots of folks from others places who say that bees are routinely wintered here, but everyone I've met or talked to says it can't be done without an especially designed, heated, and dehumitified building. I've talked to over 30 local (northern Minnesota) bee keepers and none of them winter bees here, most have tried, but none have had any success.
     
  5. tb1234

    tb1234 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies. All these terms are just greek to me still. I have perusing a lot of websites, but need one that has a dictionary as far as frames, nucs, deeps, ect. :shrug:

    I really love the look of the TBH. HOpefully then I won't get a big ol' go away from the neighbors when we move to that neighborhood. Our property borders an alfalfa field. :dance:
     
  6. FlipFlopFarmer

    FlipFlopFarmer Well-Known Member

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    Of all the bee books I've read so far, Beekeeping for Dummies is the easiest to understand and provides you with definitions along the way. I typically don't care of the dummy style of books but this one I like. They don't discuss TBH but a lot of good basic information that applies to bees in general.

    :) Carla
     
  7. tb1234

    tb1234 Well-Known Member

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