Is oregano a "forever" herb plant like rosemary or does it die after going to seed?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Real Hawkeye, May 26, 2006.

  1. Real Hawkeye

    Real Hawkeye Well-Known Member

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    I planted oregano about two years ago, and it has been a huge producer. It's spread out all over the place like a low bush, and makes great flavored leaves. Now it seems to be going to seed. Is this the end of it's life, or does it just keep producing like a rosemary bush? Thanks.
     
  2. turtlehead

    turtlehead Well-Known Member

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    I've read that oregano is a perennial, not a biennial. This is my first year growing it, so I can't tell you from personal experience.
     

  3. katydidagain

    katydidagain Adventuress--Definition 2 Supporter

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    I've had my oregano plant for at least 8 years; it's definitely a perennial. However, it's possible the current plant is a volunteer seedling I rescued a few seasons ago. Mine blooms little white flowers; if you don't rush to clean up your beds at the end of the season and take your time in spring, it's amazing how many babies you find. I'm a confirmed lazy seed saver and bird do plants are always a bonus.
     
  4. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

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    Oregano is a perennial. And it is a plant which, like mint, likes to spread and spread and spread and spread.......
     
  5. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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    Hm. Somehow, my oregano did not get that information. It did not come back this year.

    Grr! :flame:

    I'll have to try it again this year to see what happens.

    Pony!
     
  6. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    lol, it is terrible being out of the loop. imagine how the plant felt, hehehe.
     
  7. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    You could have some of mine, there is a TON.
     
  8. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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    Well, I don't need a TON... just a small plant or cutting before I use up the last of what's left from last year. :)

    But thanks for the offer, Sullen. :D

    Pony!
     
  9. Daddyof4

    Daddyof4 Well-Known Member

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    If you live in a cold climate, you need to mulch it with hay over the winter to protect it from frost. The one year I didn't was the year it died, and I live in the South.

    Wilbursmommy
     
  10. Daddyof4

    Daddyof4 Well-Known Member

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    Wilbursmommy-wife of Daddyof4
     
  11. Real Hawkeye

    Real Hawkeye Well-Known Member

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    You know, I don't live much south of you (just west of Gainesville, Florida), and I didn't do a thing to protect mine last two winters, and we had lots of nights below freezing. I guess because it's low to the ground, it didn't freeze. If it had gotten a little colder, maybe it would have. I think from now on I will cover it in the coldest month of the winter. Don't want to lose such a prolific oregano bush. Do you call them bushes, by the way? It's pretty big and spread out.
     
  12. Red Devil TN

    Red Devil TN Well-Known Member

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    Oregano is indeed a perennial. I have had Italian, Greek and a bunch of box store Oregano. Noticed no real difference between the Italian and the Greek ones, but they were a whole lot more potent that the other ones. I had about four beds that were about 7 years old in MA. The one at my Parent's was about 10 years old before we tilled it under for the Greek one.