Is milking goats time consuming?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by russellsmom, Sep 16, 2004.

  1. russellsmom

    russellsmom Well-Known Member

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    My supplier of raw goat milk informed me they cannot sell me milk anymore. I think they could possibly get around that and I hope that they do, but if not I was wondering how much effort it would be just to go get a milk goat.
    We have pygmy's, but I don't milk them.
    For those of you who do milk goats, is it very time consuming? How long does it take on average to milk a goat? I'm just wondering if I should consider getting a milk goat.
    In the meantime I'm crossing my fingers and hoping that they can work something out.
     
  2. okgoatgal2

    okgoatgal2 Well-Known Member

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    no. it takes longer for the goat to finish eating than to milk her, once you know how to do it. i could milk (by hand) and feed 5 goats with 2 stands, in less than 30 min. from the time i got to the barn until i left it...including catching, washing the udders, dishing feed, feeding the whole group, and doing the chicken and hog feeding, too. feeding included throwing them hay. twice a day. and i got abotu 4 gal of milk a day from my nubs. (total, not each) they weren't great milkers, but they were easy milkers...i wouldn't keep one that wasn't easy to let her milk down.
     

  3. farmgirl85

    farmgirl85 Member

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    Hi, it does not take very long at all to milk a goat by hand with alittle practice. I started milking a couple years ago and seems to me that if you get a system down pat you got it made. It took me about a week to get a system down. Get a nice milk stand and a good seamless stainless bucket (to prevent bacteria growth) baby wipes and teat dip. There are some good books at your local farm store. Keep us updated on how it works out. Good Luck!
     
  4. sancraft

    sancraft Well-Known Member

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    It takes me about 30 minutes to let out the babies, get the feed, put the lady on the stand ilk her, put the other on the stand, milk and feed her, pour up the milk and get in the fridge. Plus I find it very relaxing.
     
  5. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    it take me about an hour to feed and milk my goats, 5 of them . But mine are really slow eaters , and I have to wait of them., to finish up their grain, other wise, it would take no time at all. you can milk a goat in about 3 to 5 minutes.
     
  6. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    Heck, you've already got goats. Milking is fun and easy if you get a decent milker. Most of the time, I milk once a day. The milking part, for two does, takes 15 to 20 minutes, but that includes setting up the equipment (jar, strainer, bucket of ice water, strip cup), dishing feed, washing and drying the udders, checking the milk with the strip cup, milking the does, using teat dip, straining the milk, putting the jar into the ice water, and organizing the equipment so I can carry everything back to the house in one trip. So that's it. From resting goats to milk in the fridge in 20 minutes. And I'm not particularly quick. I say go for it!

    Your biggest concern is going to be getting a milk goat that won't beat up on your pygmies too badly, but even that can be dealt with. PM me if you have questions. And good luck!
     
  7. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    That's 1/2 and hour to 1 hour every day, every night, winter and summer, for as long as you want milk, freeze the excess flat in the freezer and you can take her pregnancy off. Anyone can feed your pygmy's for you when you go out of town, nobody knows how or wants to come and milk your goats. The babies need most of the milk for the first 12 weeks, so there's no milk for you, or dealing with buyers for the kids. There's mastitis, milk fever, poor milkers, does who won't let you milk them, does who don't let their milk down (especially because you have their baby trapped away), bottles and babies to feed because you want the milk, understanding the nutritional differences between your meat pygmies and dairy goats :) Trying to find milkers that don't come from pet homes, where they either nursed kids for 3 months or where milked until the folks got bored or their kids go off to school, making for a doe who when you get her, she automatically starts dryping up at 3 months.

    Your pymys are probably the most disease resistant goat there is, so don't automatically think that your new goats will follow in the same easy way.

    Go for it, but go for it with your eyes wide open. Vicki
     
  8. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Beware of tiny teated goats.....they are hard on the thumbs!

    Get a well mannered goat with a good set of handles and you'll be done in a hurry.
     
  9. dscott7972

    dscott7972 Well-Known Member

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    I milk four and if I didn't have to wait for them to eat I'd be done in 16-20 minutes, but mine are still fast eaters with 2lb of grain and I'm still done under 30 minutes. I feed rabbits, cats, give hay etc while I'm waiting for them to finish eating.
    The biggie, going places. Its hard to go camping when you have to be home 6AM or whatever time, you don't skip a day or a milking. I'm milking mornings only now and its nice to have evenings free, not having to wait until after 6PM to do something.
     
  10. mailman

    mailman Miniature Cattle

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    Hello, I do not have goats yet but have been reading. Isn't it possible to ease the chore of milking by leaving the kid to suckle the mom and just taking milk off alittle at a time when you need it? Curious to hear your answers.....Dennis
     
  11. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    If a doe has more than one kid, there most likely won't be any milk "when you need it" after the first three weeks or so. The kids don't need that much milk, but they'll pretty much take what they can get. I put the kids in a separate area at night (where they can see but not reach Mom), and milk only in the morning. That way there's plenty for everyone.
     
  12. DWFarms

    DWFarms Member

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    I agree with Laura.

    I also do my kids the same way. By putting them up and and only taking milk from them in the morning the do in return will produce the milk needed for the kids and you. However if you keep the kids on her and don't milk at all. Then the doe will only supply enough milk for the kids.

    So the short of it. If you don't milk in the mornings. You milk production will be down when she hits her peak.

    Also I know alot of people who milk their pygmys. Sucessfully at that. So the next time yours kids. Look at the udder and see what you have. If you can't manage the small teats then you may end up needing a fullsize goat.

    If you are goin to get a Dairy Goat for personal milk use. I would recommend buying from a known breeder with proof of testing. Make sure you are getting a healthy goat. Not all dairy goats have good teats. I would make sure to see the doe in milk and be able to have hands on before I purchased her. A good milker will have big orfices and a wide stream of milk. You don't want something you have to strain to get milk out of. I would also recommend a trained milker as it will be easier on you in the begining.