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Discussion Starter · #81 ·
Part B is absolutely optional. You make the choice to have it or not. If you don't choose to have it until a later time then you're penalized. That was your choice knowing the penalty would happen for late sign up.

I don't know where in the heck you got they'll withhold your SS. They don't. Can't legally do so since you paid into it.
And I don't know where the heck you say that Part is "absolutely optional." From what I read, you can put it off, but you can't decline it unless you're paying for insurance somewhere else.

We don't use prescription pharmaceuticals if we can help it. If we absolutely had to, we'd pay out of pocket for it. We budget accordingly.

What it boils down to, and as others have observed, this is not "optional," and the way they force it is unconstitutional. If any other entity did it, they'd be looking at RICO charges.

It rankles to be forced to be forced to do anything. The government isn't supposed to be in business of any kind, certainly not in the insurance business. There are plenty of insurance companies out there.
 
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This is all well and good and I know it is a good idea to have health insurance. However, there are some people
who do not have it and never have had it. Nice that the gov't "offers" insurance when you get old, but I do not
appreciate having it forced on us. It is like age mandated insurance. Which, unless everyone is mandated insurance,
why does someone who is turning 65 get made to purchase it? That was pretty much my whole issue with the whole
thing. Yeah, I would love to have great insurance, but I don't like the gov't telling me that just because I hit a certain
age I HAVE to have it.
Off the top of my head there isn't anything else that has an age requirement where suddenly you are forced to pay
for something whether you want it or not.
Mainly because when you age, you'll suddenly find out that you have health issues that needs covering regardless of your ability to pay or not. That's one reason why I'm hoping the USA eventually has Universal Health system in place some day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #84 ·
Now I am thoroughly confused.

I thought you had to have Part A to get Part B.

The paper I got from Big Brother the government says I can/should sign up for A, but if I have insurance through DH's employer (I do) and his employer has more than 20 employees (they do), I can opt out of B for now.
 
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Now I am thoroughly confused.

I thought you had to have Part A to get Part B.

The paper I got from Big Brother the government says I can/should sign up for A, but if I have insurance through DH's employer (I do) and his employer has more than 20 employees (they do), I can opt out of B for now.
What you've stated above is true. In fact, I did that myself. At age 65, I got Part A but did not enroll in Part B because I was still working with a very good employee health insurance plan. When I retired at age 67, I enrolled in Part B....but, I did not have to if I didn't want to.
 

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"If you don’t qualify for Part A without having to pay a monthly premium, you might be able to buy Part A. To buy Part A, you must also sign up for Part B."

From this site;


The whole mess is really confusing and frustrating because Medicare wants you to sign up just to ask questions about anything and then you get directed through their preset question tree.
 

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@Pony and @robin416 I had to read the whole section on their site. You have to get part B first if you have to BUY part A. Part A is free if you or your spouse have paid Medicare taxes for at least 10 years. The pdf won't let me copy and paste the info. Grrrr.
I was beginning to wonder if that's what that buying Part A was about. Not enough work hours. There are also some that buy Part A because they're not yet 65.

The problem seems to be that people are confusing what you found @Danaus29 to what normally happens when you qualify for Part A.

Or it's being used as part of an agenda.
 

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Nice quote from a guy on one of the firewood forums I lurk at:
"My Great, Great, Great, Great Aunt Bea would get that wry little wrinkled lip-look when I would ask her to what does she attribute her living to such a ripe-old age. Then, she would explain that she read her Bible every day and that she believed in doctor left leg and doctor right leg. So, I asked her Aunt Bea born 1877, what does that mean, that you don't like doctors ? And, she would get that wry little wrinkled lip-look again and say she did not know if she liked doctors or didn't but that she had never been to one and never would. "
 
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I've had to sign up this year and Medicare plus a supplement is cheaper than what was being paid for my coverage through DH's policy. I've also had the opportunity to 'break it in' with my ankle fracture a couple of months ago. Multiple appointments, casting & splints, xrays, surgery, physical therapy later.... they said my deductible for the year was $233 and that really is what it is. I had been thinking of signing up for an Advantage plan, but experience is now telling me that I chose well with standard Medicare and the supplement. Despite the name, Advantage really doesn't seem to have any advantages.
Medicare Advantage and a Supplemental Plan are two different animals.
Advantage absolutely sucks. Having a supplemental plan is absolutely necessary unless you have very deep pockets.

Folks - if you are approaching retirement, please talk to Medicare experts before making any decisions. There are many “senior centers “ that will do this for free.
There are also insurance representatives that will try to talk you into their plan too.
 

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@Big_Al, if only we could afford to have 300$ a month taken from our SS checks. It's just not realistic for many. Or maybe I should say most.

There absolutely is a rider that can be added with the right company. I pay less than 50$ a month on top of my Advantage plan. I'm reimbursed for quite a bit of out of pocket expenses for surgeries or hospital stays.
 

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Things might have changed since I turned 65 in 2013, but at that time it was mandatory to sign up for Part A within a certain time after your 65th birthday.
I did not use it, because I worked for two more years after that.
When I started collecting Social Security the government automatically signed me up for Part B and started deducting that from my monthly benefit.
I also signed up for a Supplemental Plan, not Advantage.
The first plan I chose had a high deductible and high out of pocket. A three day emergency hospitalization showed me the foolishness of that.
I now have a supplement called Plan F which covers everything. My total knee replacement, which when all was said and done would have cost over $200,000, cost me nothing.
Do your homework.
 

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@Big_Al, if only we could afford to have 300$ a month taken from our SS checks. It's just not realistic for many. Or maybe I should say most.

There absolutely is a rider that can be added with the right company. I pay less than 50$ a month on top of my Advantage plan. I'm reimbursed for quite a bit of out of pocket expenses for surgeries or hospital stays.
The adjusted gross income of my wife and I puts us below the federal poverty level, even with my part time job.
We are stone poor. But, we manage to find the money for necessities, and good health care is one.
We don’t have a lot of “stuff” our trucks are both almost 20 years old, we just prioritize.
 
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What you've stated above is true. In fact, I did that myself. At age 65, I got Part A but did not enroll in Part B because I was still working with a very good employee health insurance plan. When I retired at age 67, I enrolled in Part B....but, I did not have to if I didn't want to.
As long as your insurance is Part B compliant you won't be assessed a penalty if you sign-up for Part B at a later time. The penalty is severe so you'll want to make sure your alternative insurance is compliant. I think the penalty is 10% of the Part B premium for each year you didn't have Part B or an approved substitute, and you'll have to pay that penalty for the rest of your life.

You don't buy Part A. You are covered for Part A. Part B is the one that costs the 170$ a month.
Most everyone contributed to FICA for 10 years or more so most retirees don't pay a Part A premium. But if you contributed for less than 10 years, calculated as 40 quarters, then there is a hefty premium. If you contributed for 30 to 39 quarters then your Part A premium will be $274/month, and of you contributed for less than 30 quarters your Part A premium will be $499/month.

So if you contributed for 40 quarters or more you might as well take Part A because it will cost you nothing.
 

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As long as your insurance is Part B compliant you won't be assessed a penalty if you sign-up for Part B at a later time. The penalty is severe so you'll want to make sure your alternative insurance is compliant. I think the penalty is 10% of the Part B premium for each year you didn't have Part B or an approved substitute, and you'll have to pay that penalty for the rest of your life.



Most everyone contributed to FICA for 10 years or more so most retirees don't pay a Part A premium. But if you contributed for less than 10 years, calculated as 40 quarters, then there is a hefty premium. If you contributed for 30 to 39 quarters then your Part A premium will be $274/month, and of you contributed for less than 30 quarters your Part A premium will be $499/month.

So if you contributed for 40 quarters or more you might as well take Part A because it will cost you nothing.
Thank you. Very informative.
 

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I have an Advantage plan and believe it's saved me a lot of money - it's good especially for people who are healthy and seldom need to se a doctor. Once age and all it's medical issues set in, I think changing to a supplemental is in order.

Although, here's an article in today's news....

 
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I have an Advantage plan and believe it's saved me a lot of money - it's good especially for people who are healthy and seldom need to se a doctor. Once age and all it's medical issues set in, I think changing to a supplemental is in order.
If you've been in a Medicare Advantage plan and switch to traditional Medicare, supplemental plan providers can make you medically qualify to be a subscriber. Depending on your health at the time, that can be a problem.
 

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If you've been in a Medicare Advantage plan and switch to traditional Medicare, supplemental plan providers can make you medically qualify to be a subscriber. Depending on your health at the time, that can be a problem.
"providers can make you medically qualify to be a subscriber". Nevada, I do not understand. Please explain "medically qualify" in this statement.
 
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