Is Mastitis Clearing?

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by ericakc, Sep 1, 2006.

  1. ericakc

    ericakc Well-Known Member

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    First the good news. I finally found my Brown Swiss. Sophie is 7.5 years old. She was raising 3 bottle calves for her previous family (kind of skinny now). She is a real sweetie: halter broke, no fuss at milking, hasn't escaped her pen.

    [​IMG]

    Now bad. I got her Saturday morning and by Sunday night her back left quarter was hard. Monday morning showed clots in that quarter's milk. The vet came out Monday around noon. He started her on a 3 dose treatment of DairyClox (cloxicillin). Monday night the left front quarter was now hard. I used one of the tubes in that quarter Monday night. The back left quarter was getting softer by Monday night. Tuesday morning the left front was swollen and the "milk" was mostly a light brown water, it felt feverish and she was sensitive to milking. I called the vet again. He had me come in for more DairyClox and an IM injection of penicillin. Wednesday morning the infection appeared to be breaking up in the left front. Lots of large clots came out. The milk still appeared to be mostly serum.

    Now, Friday morning, the rear quarter is almost normal; I can still feel some more firm areas of that quarter, but the front is still quite swollen. I got a few small clots out this morning. The milk has started to look like milk again.

    I have been milking these two quarters 3-4 times during the day and massaging these quarters. She is acting fine: eating, no complaints when I milk or massage these quarters now.

    My question: is this mastitis clearing up or do I have an organism that is resistant to penicillin? I was expecting to see the swelling disappearing and no clots.

    I am not real confident in this vet. He didn't want to give LA-200 because of the 28 day withdrawal on the milk. After he left I checked that info. It seems to me that it is 96 hours withdrawal on milk and 28 days for slaughter.

    If it helps her are pictures of her two front quarters for comparison.
    Right
    [​IMG]

    Left
    [​IMG]

    Thanks much for your input.
    Erica.
     
  2. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Erica - Your reading of label is correct. Since you are not selling milk into commercial system, I wouldn't hesitate to use LA-200 if needed. Sounds like you have her on the mend. If she stops eating her grain or runs a temp(in excess of 103.5F), I would then put an IM tube in each and every quarter and simultaneously treat her with LA-200. This will normally knock out most bad bugs, but will remain in her system longer as well. If that don't do it, you'll have to test to see what mastitis bug you've got.
    If you strip away some clots or chunks, and then white milk follows, she is probably on the mend. If clear fluid or (serum) as you call it is all that comes out, she may require further treatment.

    Good Old Gal, but she's gonna need some groceries...................
     

  3. dcross

    dcross Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If she's not running a fever with the mastitis, I'd want to culture it right away to check for a chronic condition.
     
  4. ericakc

    ericakc Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies. There weren't any chunks in this morning's milk. The swelling in the front quarter seems about the same maybe a little less.

    I am concerned about the possibility of a chronic condition. I asked the previous owner about any problems with mastitis when I saw they had calves on her. I was told the only health problem she ever had was one breech calf. The vet didn't take her temp. when he was here and I don't have a thermometer. I'll get one later today.

    On the other hand it finally started raining here the day before I got her. So with muddy conditions, me being a new milker, and working the kinks out of my milking procedure, I thought it was about equally likely I caused the mastitis.

    Thanks again.
    Erica.
     
  5. john in la

    john in la Well-Known Member

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    That could very well be true. Moving the cow interrupted her milking times. She is use to letting down for calves and now you milk her and may not be striping her well enough. Your milking practices may not include teat dipping or you may be letting her go lay down just after milking. Ect Ect Ect........ Way to many reasons for mastitis to go over here.

    I agree with Up North. Since you are not a dairy I would watch and decide if the problem is clearing up. If not I would treat all quarters and give her a good shot to try and not out any bugs she may have.
    And you read correctly. The hold back for milk is 4 days on LA-200.
     
  6. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    By the way, she looks just like our Brown Swiss, Hiedi. She was also quite skinny when we got her from a dairy, but fattened up nicely. She was a real sweetie and freshened giving over 7 gallons a day plus feeding her calf. She was a good old girl who is still missed. :)
     
  7. ozarks58

    ozarks58 Member

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    It's an uphill battle with an older cow. I've treated hundreds of cows and some you win and some you don't. LA 200 never did do too much for me. S- ome people have even tried it up the udder but I think the calcium cancels it out. What works best for me is double dose on the med your putting in the teat. I use Today and do a double for daytime, then a single two or three milkings more. Sometimes even another or two of a different type as a followup. Go for a complete kill. I don't culture anymore as it was a waste as Today is recommended for all types so I don't care what the variety. If I can't get it with the above I go 3 teat if the production is worthwhile. Otherwise it's the bright lights of the big city for the old gal.

    Withholding times will be a couple days more on double dosing at first. I've never had a positive antibotic by waiting a day or two more.

    At dryoff I'd also double up on drycow treatment in those quarters as when she comes fresh your likely to relive all this--big time.
     
  8. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Erica is Swiss Miss Pregnant?
     
  9. Jennifer L.

    Jennifer L. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Erica, I'm glad your cow is coming along. Stress can bring on mastitis if the cow is carrying it already, and it's pretty often a cow can have it sub-clinical, which means it's there but just doesn't show. If she responds well and the milk remains good, that's great.

    I'm sure your vet showed you, or you know it already, but when you infuse a quarter with a mastitis treatment, only put a quarter of an inch or the least amount you can of the "needle" of the tube into the teat canal. The less you put in, the least damage you do to the teat canal. It's coated with a waxy substance that keeps the canal in good shape to keep out pathogens. If you destroy some of it by shoving the infusion part of the tube all the way in, you can help get another case of mastitis started. It's not really a big deal with a lactating cow, but every little bit helps when it comes to keeping the teat ends in good health.

    I've always liked Swiss but never had one. You are lucky! :)

    Jennifer
     
  10. ericakc

    ericakc Well-Known Member

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    Sunday morning the left front quarter seemed softer. Still not much milk from the left side, maybe a little over a quart. I filtered the left side's milk separately; I didn't see any signs of infection on the filter.

    I think I am getting the hang of milking. I am getting a gallon per milking from the right quarters, and I think I am doing a good job of stripping her out. I use a teat dip after milking and walk her around the yard for about 15 minutes afterwards for a few bites of bluegrass.

    I'm not sure if she was bred. She freshened in May and was pastured with an 18 month old Angus bull. He seemed awfully small to me. The owner said he seemed most interested in trying to nurse her.

    Roger that on the insertion of the intramammary injections. The Dairiclox had a real short needle, but I got some Today to have on hand and saw the needle on this was much longer.

    Ozark, Heidi made my top three list of Swiss names.
     
  11. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Sounds like you're getting the hang of things just fine. Next time a Vet is in the area I would have her preg checked - so you know what you have.

    Now for the big question - get any :1pig: :1pig: yet? ...LOL :)
     
  12. ericakc

    ericakc Well-Known Member

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    No pigs yet but when I was dumping all that milk after antibiotic treatment I sure wished I had a couple.
     
  13. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    ;)