Is it true?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Terri, Aug 18, 2006.

  1. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    ARE BUTTERNUT SQUASH RESISTANT TO SQUASH BUGS? What has been your experiences? :help:

    DANG, I hate squash bugs! :badmood:
     
  2. davaseco

    davaseco HERE chickie-chick-chick

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    Nope. I lost my whole lot of it to 'em.
     

  3. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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  4. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We had a really bad year with squash bugs - all the varieties of summer squash succumbed. We had one butternut vine in the same bed as the first squash and the bugs left it alone until everything else was removed. By then the vine was dying back anyway and we got a full harvest (slightly immature, but we hadn't planned on storing them anyway).
     
  5. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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    I think we can all agree; from coast to coast, this has been one nasty bug year. :flame:

    I'm thinking I should just burn all the vines, leaves, stakes, string, EVERYTHING from the raised beds.

    :shrug:

    Lousy bugs. :grump:

    Pony!
     
  6. bee

    bee WV , hilltop dweller Supporter

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    ...are resistant to squash vine borers as they have a much more solid vine(no nice hollow vine) this is supposed to be true of all the mochata branch of the squash family
     
  7. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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    Hmmm.... "Mochata"... that looks like "Mocha"... which means (to me, anyway) CHOCOLATE!

    No wonder they're good!

    Next year, it's butternuts for me! :dance:

    Pony!
     
  8. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, we sprayed with Rotenone/Pyrithium spray at first sign of squash bugs and no more problem with them ...then later stink bugs/blister beetles showed up so since most of the stems were brown and the vines dead we picked them all and prepared for the freezer. DEE
     
  9. rhome

    rhome Well-Known Member

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    For our squash plant bug treatment it's the ol' coffee can w/water and dish soap...
    every morning a cruise thru the squash raised bed reveals the little baS@#@#ts!!
    I just knock'em into their final death bath..soapy water seems to suffocate them quickly.

    Look into the squash blossom for the striped squash beetle, Just shake the blossom over the coffee can to drown the beetle.
    Also look for those tiny golden clusters of egg deposits on the back of the squash leaves...eradicate by hand and the soapy water.

    So far so good this year. with about 20 Acorn and 20 spaghetti squash from a 4x16 raised bed
    Good luck
     
  10. turtlehead

    turtlehead Well-Known Member

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    I have growing right now: yellow crookneck, acorn, butternut.

    The yellow crookneck have squash bugs the worst; the acorn have plenty too (enough that they quit bearing fruit until I sprayed with Neem). None on the butternuts.
     
  11. Zebraman

    Zebraman Well-Known Member

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    Hey Guys;C.Mochatta-ie Butternuts,Tahitian Melon Squash,Texas Indian are resistant to Vine Borers,C.Mixta's-ie.Cushaws are resistant to Squash bugs as well.
    www.gardensalive.com sells Grub away nematodes for North and South to kill lavael stage of Squash bugs.
    Also growing summer Squash in planters for a year or two will also cut down on Sq.Bug numbers and allow you to get S.squash as well.-
     
  12. rivesjct3768

    rivesjct3768 Well-Known Member

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    Picked the squash or the bugs????? LOL
     
  13. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    No squash seems immune to them. Just depends upon where and when the moth happens to land to lay her eggs. They are the main reason why I don't even try to grow squash anymore. www.attra.org/attra-pub/squashbore.html has some good info on the degree of resistance of certain varieties plus control methods.

    Martin
     
  14. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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    If I understand what I read at the attra.org site correctly, if there is a way to remove the overwintering larvae/pupae in the soil, then they can't attack the plants.

    What would happen if I decided to grow my squash in a container with fresh, bagged potting soil? There shouldn't be any larvae in THAT, so my squash might stand a fighting chance.

    Does that make sense, or is it just late and I'm a little sillier than usual?

    Pony!
     
  15. Zebraman

    Zebraman Well-Known Member

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    Hey Pony;Plowing the squash right before or right after a freeze will kill a lot of the larvae that are over-wintering in the soil.The reason C.Mochatta is resistant is because the stem is solid not hollow like C.pepo and maxima.We don't have either bug here in Venice,so I have great harvests every tear.-