Is it Snuffles or Coccidiosis?

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by 6e, Sep 10, 2005.

  1. 6e

    6e Farm lovin wife Supporter

    Messages:
    3,236
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2005
    Location:
    Kansas
    We have rabbits with runny noses, sneezing and we've lost a couple and I'm at a total loss as to what it is. How do I know whether it's Snuffles or Cocci?
    We have 5 gallon buckets that we fill up with water for the rabbits and the chickens often drink out of the buckets and I know that Coccidiosis is an ongoing problem in our chicken flock, so I'm wondering if the rabbits have it. I know that shots of Penicillin is the cure of Snuffles, but I don't want to do that if I don't have to. I hate giving shots! :eek:
    If anyone knows how I might tell the difference, let me know. We're penning up the chickens today, so that will help a lot.
    Thanks
     
  2. dlwelch

    dlwelch Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    831
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2002
    Location:
    Central Texas
    If you lose a rabbit from an "unknown", you need to open the rabbit
    and check for abnormalities. If coccidia are a contributing factor, the
    liver will not look normal and healthy.

    The cocci in poultry is strictly "host specific". You can verify this
    by the on line Merck Vet Manual. It does sound as though a bit more
    sanitation could be practiced for the health of the rabbits. In my
    opinion
    , an open container of water going to the rabbits is not a
    good idea.

    Probably depends upon the bacteria associated with the "snuffles". If
    you are referring to Pasteurella, I doubt seriously that penicillin will cure
    it. As I haven't had a case of snuffles in my rabbits in years, I'm not
    much of an expert in that area though. I would look at the ventilation
    aspect if I continued to have respiratory problems.

    It is possible that you have a combination of parasites and bacteria
    and/or viruses as offending agents.

    I doubt that anyone can provide a correct diagnosis over the
    internet.

    Linda
     

  3. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

    Messages:
    3,471
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2004
    Location:
    NC
    I agree with Linda, but please also remember that although you may 'cure' a rabbit with snuffles, you then have a carrier on your hands. I suggest culling, if that's what it turns out to be.

    I'd take at least one sick rabbit to the vet for examination, and cultures if necessary. You really need to identify what you're dealing with before you can plan. If you're losing rabbits, a vet visit, although costly, will save money in the long run. Especially if you fall into the "treat for this, treat for that, guess work' that many people do.

    Meg
     
  4. 6e

    6e Farm lovin wife Supporter

    Messages:
    3,236
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2005
    Location:
    Kansas
    I do want to thank you, unfortunately, a vet visit is not an option at this time.
    My hubby does not consider the rabbits very high on the list for important farm animals.
    I don't think ventilation is a problem as the rabbits are outdoors under the trees. They get quite a bit of breeze. We had to move them under the trees when the temps were getting well over 100 this past summer and around the buildings was just stifeling. That and we clean under the cages once a week and the cages when they need it.
    As far as the water buckets, they are quite a ways away from the house and no hose out that far, I'm not sure our pump would put pressure out that far so carrying buckets of water is the only option at this time. All that will change this winter.
    About the penicillian, I've been showing rabbits for about 15 years and I've never delt with Snuffles in the past except once, thank goodness, but all the other rabbit people say that is the cure. A shot once a day for three days intramuscular. But I'm not positive that's what I'm dealing with.
    I can't open up the bunnies, as they're already gone, but if I lose anymore I will. The rabbits that have been sick have all been kept together, so I think we're going to get everyone off by themselves until we know for sure that it hasn't gone any further. So, sad.
     
  5. BeesNBunnies

    BeesNBunnies Schnauzer nut

    Messages:
    260
    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2005
    Location:
    Mena, Arkansas
    Since going to the vet isn't an option I'd quarantine and cull(cull harder than you think you need to). If we are talking about regular meat type rabbits you can always rebuild your herd fairly quickly. Not sure exactly what is wrong with yours but in general animals that have had a major illness and been nursed through it aren't as productive afterwards. I know it's hard not to try and save them but speaking from an economical point of view(homestead economy of course) it may be best not to try.
     
  6. dlwelch

    dlwelch Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    831
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2002
    Location:
    Central Texas
    I would certainly cover the water containers to prevent contamination
    by poultry, wild birds, etc.

    Some chickens harbor salmonella (the reason we are told to NOT
    consume raw eggs). That can be passed to a rabbit via fecal
    contamination.

    I would not be concerned about chickens transferring coccidiosis
    to the rabbits. I would be scared to death that I would lose my
    herd because they contracted salmonella from the chickens.
     
  7. 6e

    6e Farm lovin wife Supporter

    Messages:
    3,236
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2005
    Location:
    Kansas
    Thank you again for your suggestions. They're not meat rabbits, they are Mini Rex. My daughter got started with a couple of pet rabbits and then wanted to show and has loved the showing part. We do butcher them if we get too many. It was one of the pet ones that started all this and we did cull him out right away and bleached his cage, bowl, feeder etc and let them sit out in the sun for about a month.
    We did find some lids for our buckets and covered them. That was a good idea. Thanks. :bow:
    I never thought about Sal. That's a scarey thought. :(
    Thank you again for your help. Hopefully we get it stopped before any more get it. Some of the bunnies were expensive to buy and it hurts to lose one, especially when it's one of our rarer colors. :(
     
  8. natybear

    natybear Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    300
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2005
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    Not to be a downer, but vet's don't ever seem to know anything about rabbits in my area and rabbits don't respond well to surgery or anything else they try to do to fix a rabbit problem anyway. Also there is no cure for snuffles you can supress it but Pasteurella will infect your reproductive, respiratory and nasal ways and you might not even know it. If you see a snotty nose, that animal must be culled!!! If you have it in one animal it is not going to take long for everyone to get it if you have it in you reproductive system or nasal ways. A snotty nose with milky to yellowish color is a disease, only clear mucus can be safe, and not always is it safe. I hate when you have to make the hard choices with loved animals and mini rexes are one of my favorite, but you can't risk the rest of your herd, you many never get the chance to prevent this disease if it isn't stopped. I hope it isn't snuffles, or salmonella for that matter, and I hope it's not to late for your herd too. Good Luck, I hope this helps!