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As stated previously, these plants are not going extinct. Traditional farming regions for certain crops may change to crops better adapted for the coming climate. That is different From extinction when it comes to domesticated crops.
Cocoa is from the Amazon rainforest, vanilla is from Madagascar that will be deforested prior to climate change has a chance to take hold, and coffee is from Africa- all crops now grown on 3-4 continents worldwide by perhaps hundreds of thousands of farmers, probably millions of farmers.
Stating that they will go extinct in the wild may be fact, but suggesting they will go extinct in cultivation is false. Farmers will find a way to keep them alive by adapting their farming techniques, their lives depend on it. Have faith.
Now apparently the clone of bananas that we all buy at the grocery store may go extinct in cultivation. Not due to climate change. But there are other types of bananas that are immune to that disease. Meaning we will have to adapt.
 

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Dandelions are free, except for the incredible amount of work that it takes to dig them out, grind and roast them. We run them through the food processor just after digging and washing. Once they are roasted, they will ruin any implement that you try to use to get them into fine particles. Makes a fairly good coffee substitute, just like chicory does. We use both as coffee stretchers, more so than replacements.

Some blend of beaver castor and maple syrup would get you a fairly good vanilla replacement.

It's not always about having what you want, but wanting what you have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #83 ·
Dandelions are free, except for the incredible amount of work that it takes to dig them out, grind and roast them. We run them through the food processor just after digging and washing. Once they are roasted, they will ruin any implement that you try to use to get them into fine particles. Makes a fairly good coffee substitute, just like chicory does. We use both as coffee stretchers, more so than replacements.

Some blend of beaver castor and maple syrup would get you a fairly good vanilla replacement.

It's not always about having what you want, but wanting what you have.
What about Chocolate? I tried carob it tasted horrid.
 

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What about Chocolate? I tried carob it tasted horrid.
Chocolate mint or Himalayan honeysuckle. Never tried either, but a quick Google search pointed me in that direction. Carob powder is easy to overdo in a recipe. I don't know about Himalayan honeysuckle but I have tried Himalayan venison, on account of I found Himalayan in the road.
 
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