Is it possible? Viable biomass furnace now in production

Discussion in 'Alternative Energy' started by tinknal, Nov 13, 2006.

  1. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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  2. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I tend to be a cynic, so please take my comments for the litle they are. :)

    I'm puzzled by their wizz-bang style of claiming to remove the heat from whithin the burning mass. One really doesn't need 2000 degree heat to heat a building, and collecting higher temp heat is harder on the materiels used to collect it, as well as interfering with a typical good, efficient burn. I'd wish for less buzz words & wizz-bang wow on this, and more pracical info on what the heck they are talking about.

    It kinda just sounds like a pellet stove, but they have a feed mechanism that handles loose, un-peletized material......

    Seems that that would work.

    However, it is not 'free' to process your fuel into a smooth-feeding particle stream. As well, the water content is typically _very_ sensitive on these things, you can't just grind up green wood, rained-on cornstalks, green grass clippings, and expect to have a good end result. One needs to harvest, dry, collect, and store a top-quality fuel source to have a good, efficient, problem-free heat source. This ground up loose biomass has less BTU per cubic yard than almost anything else (lots of air in the mix, lower energy density than liquid fuels/ coal/ solid wood/ pellets/ etc.) so you need a large storage area.

    All that work is on you.

    Having said all that, it sure can work out, and does look like an interesting product. :)

    --->Paul
     

  3. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I suppose it depends on the form the biomass is in when you usually dispose of it. Poultry litter, cornstalks, swamp hay, etc. is pretty dry to start with. Local climate would also make a difference. Manure from loafing sheds is usually pretty dry too.
     
  4. Jim-mi

    Jim-mi Well-Known Member

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    "Hopper full MAY last up to 24 hrs." "All you gotta do is keep it full."
    Go look again at the size of that hopper.
    You is gonna be a busy boy filling that hopper every *22* hrs.
    And you better have a very BIG pile of fuel protected from the weather.

    The idea sounds good -----but

    I just looked at a Bixby Biomass System corn stove.
    It uses "glow bars" for the first 10 minutes to get it up to temp and running.
    It requires 10 amps AC (at 120 vac) for 10 minutes, to get it fired up !!!!!!
    NOT a good thing for off griders.
    Also if the grid goes down . . . . . . .you will have NO heat.

    The unit looks good -------but
    not for me.
     
  5. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think it will work best in applications where you already have an abundance of fuel and a tractor to load it. You can fill that hopper in about a minute if you use a front end loader. They seem to be marketing it to these types of settings.