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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After 4 attempts to breed by Cal doe to my NZ/Cal buck with no luck, I finally decided that my buck is a dud. She lifted, he grunted and fell off many times. Then nothing! 4 times! :Bawling:

So I decided to bred to my angora buck. He is very willing and newly able. I bred my Champagne doe to my blue pearl French Angora and she is due on Saturday. :dance: It will be her first litter and mine also. I'm very excited! She is 6 1/2 months old. I also breed my 3 yr old Cal doe to the same FA. She is due on 2/3.

I'm just wondering what to expect in the nest box with the Champagne/FA cross. Will some be little fuzzballs, or is the angora hair recessive?

On 2/3 when the Cal doe has kits, then I will know for sure that it's the buck that's a dud and will have my first freezer camp rabbit. It's such a drag 'cause he is a nice big buck. I got him at 18 months and nursed him back from sore hocks (not his fault, he was in a pretty rusty cage) and now he's not grumpy anymore. Oh well!

Kat
 

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I wouldn't be in too much of a hurry to send the buck to freezer camp. It's possible the doe was just a late bloomer... 6.5 months is not that old. Have you tried the buck on other does with the same lack of success?
 

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winding down
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I'm thinking the Cal doe is the three-year old, not the 6 mos old. But then, if she's never been bred, she could be a sterile doe. I'd still wait, even if she produces, and try that buck with a second doe. It'd be a shame to send an otherwise good buck off to camp prematurely.

edited to add...that didn't answer your question at all, did it? I believe the angora hair type is recessive, but I don't have first-hand knowledge...yet!
 

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Wool is recessive, as is Rex and Satin, but they are all on different alleles. Meaning that normal fur bred to a wooled rabbit will result in all normal bunnies, but they carry the wool gene hidden, The same goes for a Rex to normal, or a Satin to normal. To take it a step further into the land of confusion, a wool to a Rex produces normal, as a Rex to a Satin, or Satin to wool. It starts getting hairy ( pun intended) however when you highly interbreed these three crosses and end up many generations later with rexed satinized wooled (very short soft wool with a satin texture) coats ;)

Kelly :)
 

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I use a French Angora as a buck for my butcher buns. The first generation is always short haired, but if you breed those back to each other the second generation will be half long haired and it will be more after succesive line breeding. But F1 is always short haired and they make wonderful butchers crossed with a NZ.
 

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When I crossed my Creme d' Argent buck to my red Satin Angora doe I got normal furred red and fawn kits that had silvering, not as heavy as the Creme's but very visible. They were big healthy fast growing babies that showed quite a bit of hybrid vigor. Whatever colors you get from the Champagne d'Argent will most likely have some silvering. While angora fur is a recessive silvering is dominant, in varying degrees.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The dud buck is 2 years old now. I don't know if he had been used to breed before. He was my first purchase and I made many newbie mistakes. I would never buy from this breeder again either. The female I bought with him died of snuffles 1 1/2 weeks after I got her and he had sore hocks.

I will try him with another doe in a couple months I guess, just to make sure. But at the time of my first 4 tries, the older Cal doe was my only option. Now I have 6 does able to breed, but only the Champagne was cooperative.

The Angora Buck will be six months in a couple days, but he is already "proven" so to speak. I had him in a cage with my FA doe until I got my new cages, then seperated them. They were about 4 months old at the time and he was always trying to ride her and her fur got so messed up. Well I was out there changing water during a really cold spell about 5 weeks ago and noticed a little blood in the corner of the FA does cage. I turned her over and checked and there was a little blood on her fur underneath, but no damage. Then I saw it :eek: a little pink piece of flesh that had fallen thru the wire onto the ground. On closer inspection I can only say it looked like the back and part of a head or butt, I don't know. But from the hairless pink skin it was for sure a kit. How many did she have? :shrug: They would have for sure froze to death and she ate them all except for this part of one. I'm just glad she made it through a birth a such a young age, and so dissapointed that I could have finally had babies (french angoras at that!) but wasn't on the ball. Anyway that's when I got the bright idea of using the FA buck.

"I use a French Angora as a buck for my butcher buns."

Good to know. I thought it was a good choice just based on his size also.


Very interesting info about the Rex, Satin and Wool, since I also have a Rex buck and two Rex does and Satin doe. I'm starting to think of all the cool combos I could make! :D

Kat
 

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hmm but wait a minute, if you bred the angora wool with a regular type fur and of course got all regular furs, then took the kits grew them out and bred back a daughter to the Angora buck, that would give you 75% chance of getting kits with the wool BUT would the quality of the wool be compromised? A FA breeder once told me this was the case, what do you all think?
 

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BUT would the quality of the wool be compromised?
Absolutely! You have no idea about the quality of the 'wool' on the normal furred parent that was added to the gene pool. Most normal furred breeds have been bred to have a good amount of guard hairs present evenly in the coat. When this becomes wool, those guards are still there, just they change the texture from cottony to more coarse (Think more along JW or FA wool). You need an extremely dense, cottony textured normal coat with sparse guard hairs - and even then the quality may not be there consistently, as it has not been bred true for any length of time.

Kelly :)
 

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However, if you're just looking for meat, the 2 batches of Californian crossed with German Angora bucks I have now are the biggest, fastest growing rabbits I've ever grown. They reached 6.5 lbs at 10 weeks. I have been amazed at their size from birth. I guess I don't get to taste them, though, because I think I've sold all of them. Oh, well, next time.
And they have thicker, heavier wool than their moms, but not long like their daddies.
 

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However, if you're just looking for meat, the 2 batches of Californian crossed with German Angora bucks I have now are the biggest, fastest growing rabbits I've ever grown. They reached 6.5 lbs at 10 weeks. I have been amazed at their size from birth. I guess I don't get to taste them, though, because I think I've sold all of them. Oh, well, next time.
And they have thicker, heavier wool than their moms, but not long like their daddies.
When you get one of those to butcher, I'd be interested in hearing how they dress out. Do the German Angoras have heavy bones like, say, Flemish giants? 6.5 pounds at 10 weeks is great, provided the bone to meat ratio is not too high.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
However, if you're just looking for meat, the 2 batches of Californian crossed with German Angora bucks I have now are the biggest, fastest growing rabbits I've ever grown.
It will be great if I can get near those results from my California/French Angora cross. Those aren't due until 2/3.

My Champagne is on the small side, so hopefully the FA will help get larger kits with small bone like the Champagne. They're due on Saturday! I can't stand it! Two more days! I hope she's a good mom. She jumped in the nest box and started eating all the hay, then filled it with berries. No pee, thankfully.

Kat
 

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I am doing this exact thing right now. I started out with my top 4 French Angoras - all grand champions. These were bred to New Zealand Reds in order to introduce wideband and rufus to produce true red FAs. I now have 4wooled F2 generation crosses. I have shown them in French Angora classes - winning BOB with one doe recently against 17 other rabbits. The 2 month old buck got very good comments at the last show I attended. I'll be showing him at the PA state convention against some of the top FA breeders in the country - I look forward to how he places in his class.
My 2 does are growing their first adult coats right now, so I'll have to wait 2-3 more months before I can really judge what sort of coat this first wooled generation will have, and probably late in the year before I can get a good idea of how long the coat will hold, and how evenly it will shed out. The junior coats are WONDERFUL. :^)
Lisa
http://www.somerhillfarm.com

hmm but wait a minute, if you bred the angora wool with a regular type fur and of course got all regular furs, then took the kits grew them out and bred back a daughter to the Angora buck, that would give you 75% chance of getting kits with the wool BUT would the quality of the wool be compromised? A FA breeder once told me this was the case, what do you all think?
 
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