IRS trouble

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by Speciallady, Nov 24, 2006.

  1. Speciallady

    Speciallady Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    868
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Indiana
    The IRS has really been going at us lately. They sent us a letter last June saying they over paid us several hundred dollars and we had to pay it back, well we have been doing that, and today is the day we make our last payment. YEAH!!! Well, we got a letter this week saying that our social security numbers are wrong on our returns. And we have to send all kinds of documents proving we are who we say we are. But I don't understand why? I looked at the paperwork, and everything is accurate. Do they do this to other people as well?
     
  2. danb98577

    danb98577 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    169
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2005
    The left hand never knows what the right hand is doing at the IRS. It could well be that you passed some sort of "time limit" in payment schedule and it has sent up a red flag to mess with you. You will probably have to call and keep going up the food chain till you hit on the head Scrooge that actually has the ability to do something instead of send out another pointless, confusing form/threatening letter. Once they get a chance to make you jump through hoops they will keep at it till they drive you nuts. Can't remember the name, and I suppose it has changed anyway, but you need to speak to a supervisory level human being-politely skip past the lower minions as they will just further complicate your problems. Good luck!!!!
    If you are near a IRS office you should be able to do the same thing-in person. Keep your eyebrows up and your temper in check, but stand your ground until you have a positive result.
     

  3. Speciallady

    Speciallady Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    868
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Indiana
    I know we've paid all our payments before the day we were supposed too. Last month we paid the week after we paid the month before.
     
  4. pumpkinlady

    pumpkinlady Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    730
    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2003
    Location:
    NW PA
    Mel, Last year our return wasn't accepted because my husbands birthdate was listed wrong. Somehow, the date was wrong for years and no one ever caught it. He had to go get a copy of his birth certificate and a copy of his SS # and send it to them tofix the mistake. The IRS told us this is fairly common the past couple of years. Something about updating their systems. It was a pain in the butt with all the running around and filling out forms and such but he finally got it straightened out. I think it took about a month to do. Good luck!
     
  5. Tricky Grama

    Tricky Grama Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    31,762
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Location:
    N. E. TX
    I HATE HATE HATE THE IRS!!

    I'm so sorry for yelling, but I'm sure a lot of you will forgive me.

    Several things happened to me but the very nuttiest was this:

    I worked as an RN at a clinic for 4 years in a Dallas suburb. Paid taxes as ordered. Then out of the bllue got a notice from the hated IRS that I had not paid taxes on wages I earned DURING THE SAME TIME in Lanexa, KS.

    Yes, someone w/SS# similar to mine worked at a 7-11 there & didn't pay. Well, you'd think all I had to do was contact them & explain. NOOOOOO

    One intelligent guy at IRS said not to worry, it was a mistake. Guess they fired him b/c for 7 years they came after me for someone elses taxes. How could I be in 2 places at once!?!? I figured I'd give them a choice-give me back the taxes I paid as an RN & I'd pay this other persons 7-11 taxes! No. At any rate, I refused & fought w/them, threatening to hire a lawyer even. I think the only reason they stopped harrassing me was that 7 yrs is their limit?

    Good luck w/your fight & hang in there. I'm not sure I'd have paid them the refund back w/o a fight. Tell them your lawyer will contact them...

    Patty

    PS-did I mention I HATE 'EM!?!?
     
  6. frogmammy

    frogmammy Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    6,028
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2004
    Location:
    usa
    Tricky Grama,

    That person probably stole your SSN and was using it so they could work. Sure, you SAID that wasn't you...just what the OTHER person said! Should they believe YOU because you aren't lying, or should they believe THEM because they aren't lying?

    No, 7 years is NOT the limit when they have decided criminal activity has occurred. What they did was keep investigating and they finally found enough info to convict the other person...think of the Energizer Bunny with Tattoos, chains, a Mohawk...and an endless supply of nice, fresh, Energizer batteries.

    Speciallady,

    The SSN problem could be because some fumble-fingers in data entry hit the wrong key...or...it could be because someone else used your SSN...either knowingly or by accident. Heck, some person who prides themselves on NEVER having a SSN might have run across some situation where they absolutely HAD to have one, so did what they usually do and made one up on the spur of the moment...only, it happened to be YOUR SSN and now IRS is wondering why the number has two different names attached to it.

    Actually, it is NOT illegal to use a "made-up" SSN...as long as it's a number that could NEVER be a REAL SSN...as soon as you use a set of numbers that COULD belong to another person, that's Federal time, even if you didn't mean to use someone else's number.

    Mon
     
  7. DocM

    DocM Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,314
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2006
    Location:
    NW OR
    Get a tax lawyer. Just because the IRS says you owe them, doesn't mean you do. The IRS told me I owed them $30,000 a couple of years ago. I got a good tax lawyer to deal with them. They ended up sending ME a check for $11,000. Just because you've already paid doesn't mean you can't get it back - they make mistakes all the time.
     
  8. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Formerly LisainN.Idaho Supporter

    Messages:
    16,234
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Exactly. Same thing happened to us. Even close on the money amounts.
     
  9. omnicat

    omnicat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    514
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    Location:
    Central Ohio
    They sent us a letter last June saying they over paid us several hundred dollars and we had to pay it back

    Make sure they really DID pay you too much. Often, it's their mistake, or a simple typo on the return that's obvious if anyone actually LOOKS. A friend got a notice that they owed a couple thousand. They had to dig to find out it was because two numbers in one of their kids' SS# were transposed, so they didn't give them credit for that kid that year...same kid they've been deducting for 10 years...etc.

    Sometimes I think they send those brief, clear-as-mud notices for expected payments because they either HOPE you won't check into the reason, or are not smart enough to figure it out, and will just send them money because you're scared to say "Wait a minute...!"
     
  10. sleeps723

    sleeps723 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    745
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2006
    Location:
    east texas
    maybe if ur ssn r wrong maybe u didnt owe any money. maybe u could get it back? can a citizen charge interest loaned to the irs like that? lol cuz i know they charge us for havin theirs
     
  11. frogmammy

    frogmammy Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    6,028
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2004
    Location:
    usa
    Sleeps723,

    Actually, I know of one instance they DID pay interest on one of their mistakes! Was back in the early 1980's and one of their computers issuing refunds (and printing the checks) crashed. They couldn't figure out who actually received their refund and who didn't, so you could refile and request your refund, and they did pay interest on the refund involved. Other than that, I don't know if they pay interest.

    If they DID make a mistake you have a VERY limited amount of time to contest it for a refund. Remember, THEY don't have to prove they're right, YOU have to prove they're wrong.

    Mon
     
  12. wottahuzzee

    wottahuzzee Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    899
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2006
    Location:
    Fort Repose
    Look on their website for the taxpayer advocate information. I had a problem one year (actually my mistake) and could not get it fixed, kept getting referred to call this one which didn't handle it so they referred to . . . .

    Of course, i was getting names and addresses all the while, sent everybody a certified letter (which of course, they never get even through they are signed for) and a letter to the taxpayer advocate. Problem was fixed in about two days.

    A lot of people don't know about the advocate and so sometimes they are not real busy and can give your problem prompt attention and often get it fixed tout suite. It won't cost you anything so it is worth a try.
     
  13. pcwerk

    pcwerk Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,961
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2003
    Location:
    SE Minnesota
    the sad part is that they audit working stiffs that make <50,000 yr
    far more than they do rich people...at least thats what I heard.
    james
     
  14. Jaclynne

    Jaclynne Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    5,364
    Joined:
    May 14, 2002
    Location:
    N E Texas
    There is a very good little book published called The IRS Problem Solver by Daniel Pilla. Gives you lots of effective strategies for dealing with the IRS.

    Yes, there is a time limit for you to respond to their first notice. This spring about a week before my bil died, my sis got a notice that she owed them $14,000 from last year. Since bil had always done the returns and he wasn't able to respond, I wrote the IRS a letter refuting their claim. Along about May she got a reply thanking her for clearing up the matter and telling her she owed a zero balance. So refuting their claim does work, but you have to do so in a timely manner.

    I don't know about getting overpaid money back. It may be in the book too. Check it out at the library.

    Halo

    I just noticed on the back of the book, this Pilla guy has a website www.taxhelponline . You might want to check that out.
     
  15. Jaclynne

    Jaclynne Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    5,364
    Joined:
    May 14, 2002
    Location:
    N E Texas
    pcwerk - I agree with your assessment. I think they target who they can get the money from. Not many of us that make under $75,000 a year can afford a lawyer to fight a $1500 dollar bill, we just pay up. :shrug:

    Halo
     
  16. kasilofhome

    kasilofhome Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    10,482
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2005
    Location:
    Alaska- Kenai Pen- Kasilof
    some years ago, before most people had computers or printers I like everyone eles did my taxes by had on the forms provided.

    I kept my copies. well 3 or four years later I was being hounded for underspaying. It did not add up to me. I called them back and I went over the fig. over the phone. They increased my income quite a bit. and in tracking it with them on the phone I and the guy figuered it out.

    the W2 for one job was really off in compareded to what they claimed I claimed I earned. The W2 said 7,000 dollars and they claimed that I claimed 70,000 dollars. Well what had happened was inn inputting my hand written info the typest added one zero. He was unable to fix it, though he laughed at what a stupid mistake they made. He told me that they had garnished the refund I was counting on getting for the current year he told me that I needed to go and Write a letter asking for interest on the current years refund as it would take some time to straighten out the mess.

    Two years later I got that years refund and interest. I was told that if I had not written the letter then I would not have been able to collect the interest. So now I advise everyone to resquest interest anytime the Irs holds back or collects funds ahead of when the deal is settled. I sure wish that I had 2 years to correct a mistake. Note even though the business stated on their form and my copy of my tax records had the same amount that was not enough for them to quickly accept that they made a mistake.
     
  17. TnAndy

    TnAndy Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    5,427
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2005
    Location:
    EastTN: Former State of Franklin
    A lot of the problem at the IRS is that no human ever looks at the letters going out.

    I got a computer generated one some years ago informing me I had claimed $2000 for an IRA deduction but they 'only' had records showing the following:

    --$500 to this one mutal fund
    --$1000 to another
    --$500 to a third.


    HUH?

    So I sent them back a copy with the three figures totaled up, and that was the last I heard of that......ahahahahahaaa.......Just fills you with confidence that their computer can't add 3 figures together, doesn't it.


    Another time I got audited for business expenses. The 'red flag' was the amount of mileage claimed.

    "Do you keep a log book?"

    "Yep" .....and had the copy of the adding machine tape where I'd totaled up each month's miles in my file for that year.

    "OK....let's look at one month at random.....say February"

    So we went thru my log book, added up that month, and it matched the total on the paper copy from my adding machine ( well, heck...it OUGHT to....I'd just run it the night before after filling out my "log book" for that year with handfull of different pens and pencils.....ahahahahahaaa )

    Then she says...."Oh....you've made a mistake in the mileage factor. The multiplier for that year was .255 ( 25.5 cents a mile )......you used .225" ....which I really had when I filed it...hit the wrong key on the calculator.

    So she proceeds to go thru and multiply my whole year's mileage by the correct factor, and they owe me a couple hundred bucks refund.

    As we finished up, I looked across at her and said "Hey....this was GREAT.....can we do it again next year ? " She gives me a look that would stop a clock......ahahahahaaaa

    Ain't never heard from 'em again :D
     
  18. Danaus29

    Danaus29 Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    19,683
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Location:
    Ohio
    One mistake people make is to keep their copies of their returns for only 7 years because that is all the IRS says you have to keep them. What they don't tell you is that if they suspect fraud (and if you accidentally mess up you are attempting to defraud the govt) they can and will go back too when you first filed your taxes. We met an elderly gentleman who was fighting the IRS on an error he made 20 years back, and this was about 10 years after he retired! He had no copies of his returns having thrown them all out after the required 7 years and no way to refute what the IRS was saying. KEEP ALL YOUR RETURNS, WILL THEM TO YOUR GRANDCHILDREN!!!!!
     
  19. Ann-NWIowa

    Ann-NWIowa Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    5,849
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2002
    From my experience I'd say the IRS does not hire the smartest people in the world. At work we had an incident where the IRS had made a mistake and was sending us info about a probate estate we'd never heard of...so I called to tell them so. After hearing "we can't discuss this with you as you're not authorized" a dozen times, I interrupted and kindly explained I didn't want to discuss anything I just wanted to tell them something, they didn't need to say ANYTHING, just listen. Didn't work so we sent a letter. Got a phone call from IRS DEMANDING she speak to the boss. The boss gets on the line and she says "we can't discuss this with you as you're not authorized" ... after a brief silence boss says "but YOU called me!!" We decided next letter we'll have the post office return marked deceased (problem concerns probate estate). Fortunately not all agents are so dense!!
     
  20. primroselane

    primroselane Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,007
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Deep in the heart of Texas
    Many people get a letter which states that their name does not match the recorded name for that number. IRS gets all their name and social security number information from the Social Security Administration (SSA). A lot of women change names almost as frequently as they change clothes. If the name on the return does not match the name on the social security records a computer may automatically freeze the account until the matter is resolve.

    Additionally, some women feel they have the right to change a child's last name without going through the legal process and notifying the SSA. This is a very good way to delay any refund.

    Congress enacts the Internal Revenue Code, approves IRS rules and regulations, and oversees the agency. The President nominates the IRS Commissioner and Congress approves him. It is fascinating that politicians get so many of the public to direct their anger at the IRS instead of them. Oh well, no one ever said the electorate was bright.