irrigation

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Tabitha, May 12, 2006.

  1. Tabitha

    Tabitha greenheart

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    Ken Hargesheimer talked about a supposedly simple and effective and frugal way of watering in an article in country side magazine a few years back. I looked but can't find particulars. It utilizes a five gallon bucket and soaker hose and if I remember correctly you could get the parts at Home Depot, anybody tried this? I am reduced at present to watering with a can and carrying the water from the rainbarrels. My gardens are too big for that.
     
  2. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    this seems like a good place to add my question. i would like to make leaky pipe and would like to know how big the holes should be and how far apart. i would go with soaker hose but i have some old pvc pipe i can use for leaky pipe.
     

  3. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

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    I never saw the article but would guess it would be require nothing more than drilling a hole near the bottom of the bucket and putting a hose bib on the bucket with a washer and nut to hold it on and then just puttting the soaker hose on the hose end of the bibb and fillling with water.
     
  4. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

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    Meloc, about all you can do is experiment a bit. Will you be using a pressure (40psi) or gravity hook up to your pvc? Just start with small holes 1/16 or 1/8 spaced about a foot apart.
     
  5. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    thats about what i was thinking. i will be using a gravity system of some kind. probably will use 55 gallon drums. i do have a pressure system from a gravity fed spring supplying my house.i can use sprinklers with that if i need to.

    i have built a hydraulic ram pump. i plan to take water from the stream next to my house and leave the spring fed system for household use when i can. there are more people who need the spring line to have pressure. if i get draught conditions again, the spring line can be emptied too fast.

    my idea was to pump water from the stream into a barrel and use leaky pipe to water rows of veggies. i have heard that soaker hose is the best choice for watering most things. it is best for berries as the water stays where it should and is not rotting the fruit.
     
  6. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

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    Meloc, that sounds like a very good and efficient use of water. Drip watering definitely has some very strong advantages when water is scarce in addition to controlling the amount of moisture on your leaves and developing fruit/vegetables/blossoms. With a gravity fed system like you are thinking of using, you can adjust the number of lateral lines til you get the flow like you want. I do think it will require some experimenting to figure out.
     
  7. babysteps

    babysteps living at 6800 feet

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    Ok, the librarian in me said there had to be a way to find out more! Especially since I need this system because I am storing rain water for the dry season (see babysteps solves the watering problem --a different post here on gardening.) This is what I found at:


    http://www.newfarm.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=56&sid=577269846cac17516f8030426e2331e4

    Ken Hargesheimer says in response to someone else's post:

    "Patty, use drip irrigation. Save 70% of the water compared to sprinklers. You can buy a drip system or you can buy the poly tubing and make your own. If you decide to make your own, email me at minifarms@aol.com and I will email you how to do it. Farmers in Honduras, Nicaragua and NM have done it. One advantage of DIY is that if the holes stop up, you can clean them out.

    ken hargesheimer"


    Ken Hargesheimer has his own website at www.minifarms.com I didn't see any step by step instructions on how to do this but apparently he will e-mail the directions according to his post above. His website also has information about a free DVD for mimifarms.

    Please keep posting on this topic if you have the exact issue reference requested in the original post.

    Thanks babysteps
     
  8. BillyGoat

    BillyGoat Well-Known Member

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    I was wanting to do the soaker hoses. I have been looking at them at the stores, but the longest I have found was 50' and would end up coasting too much.

    I have seen soaker hoses that are longer, but they are the kind without any kind of end,, you add your own, so you can do straight joints or "T"'s or whatever. You can gets the connectors, they are plastic.

    Has anyone used this type of soaker?? It is a little smaller than the standard(5/8" I think).
     
  9. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

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    Billy, I've been using the regular soaker hoses in parts of my garden this year and have been very impressed with them. You can put up to four hoses end to end(according to the package) and I have had no problems with this distance. (This is with regular house water pressures so it would not necessarily work with a gravity system.
     
  10. rocket

    rocket Well-Known Member

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    In addition to soaker hoses, you can get quarter-inch vinyl tubing with drippers built in (about every 12 inches). 50 feet is about 10 bucks.

    As for making your own PVC drip tube, I would start with the smallest hole you can make (maybe .020"?). I think drip irrigation works best with a small flow for a longer time instead of a large flow for a shorter time. Later, you can always drill the holes larger if you think it would be better. Spacing depends on your soil type (large spacing for clay, short spacing for sand), but 12 inches would be my guess as a good place to start.
     
  11. Hovey Hollow

    Hovey Hollow formerly hovey1716

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    I am using the cut your own. It took about 30 minutes to set up my system exactly the way I wanted it. Each row has it's own hose, and then a non-soaker hose connects them all. It was easy and it will be expandable.
    My only problem is that the store I bought them at had two different brands. The connectors were mostly all one brand and the soaker hose was another. Well, 5/8" in one brand obviously isn't 5/8" in another brand. The soaker hose was a little bit smaller, but I wrapped a couple of layers of electrical tape around the end before I put on the connectors and then I had a tight fit. I really love the system. The water only goes where I want it to go. I then found a good deal on an electronic watering timer. We have been having good rain right now so it's not on the timer, but this summer I will get the timer set up to give it a good slow overnight soaking every three days.
     
  12. chuckhole

    chuckhole Born city, love country

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    We are using a combination. I am using the black poly tubing for the melons with drip emitters. Along each row, we are using soaker hoses. A pressure regulator is in order here since we have blown out two of them already. I did not think the well pump was strong enough to do that but it did. For the tomatoes, we are using the compost rings with six plants around each ring. They are spaced 10 feet apart with a "T" and a 40" riser with a popup sprinkler head at the top. The water runs through the compost ring and the compost tea goes to the tomatoes. The corn, squash and beans are grouped into the "Three Sisters" with four 100' soaker hoses snaking their way around the corn/bean groupings and past squash plants. Our rows are 75' so this makes it easy to match up without having to cut the length of the soakers.

    My DW wants a gravity feed system and rainwater cache but in order to get at least 25psi, we would have to use a pump or elevate the cache at least 58 feet (2.32 ft for each 1 psi)
     
  13. BillyGoat

    BillyGoat Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the info on the soaker hoses!!! I will deffinately get some!!

    Hovey, so at the end of each row, your soaker ends (with an end cap) right??

    I don't know how long you are suppose to let soaker hoses run. I am going to get a timer for them though. We are in Central Texas, so it is going to be dry and hot here real soon.