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DH and I want to move anywhere but here. We would still homestead hopefully on a larger scale. Not having water is a major fear of mine. After reading so many posts about crops drying up and dying I'm wondering how irrigation is done in other parts of the country. I live in SE Utah and in my county everyone flood irrigates their crops. We have an intricate canal system with specific days and times that you can have water. I have one water share and part of it is hooked into a hose system that I can hook a sprinkler to. We flood the pasture and get run off from the neighboring alfalfa fields. The hose has very little pressure but I can't flood by the house. Because of my hose system I can have water 24-7. It doesn't spray a large area though so I have to move the hose 10 feet over constantly. I can only flood for 6 hours one day a week. After the initial purchase of the share I pay $30 a year for my share to the canal company. The reservoir is drying up though and we will probably get water restrictions next month. We get next to no rain here in the summer. We would have to dig down hundreds of feet through shale to put in a well here which would not be cost effective. This is the norm here.

So do you rely on rain, canal water, wells, culinary water, etc? I can imagine that this might be a disheartening subject right now. It has to be difficult watching your crops struggling. I'm just trying to understand how it works in other parts of the country. This is just for crops too. I'm not concerned with culinary water unless that is what is used to water crops. Thanks for any info.
 

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Around here they use mostly flood irrigation. There are a few places with the big sprinklers. Depending on how far the farm is from the Rio Grande, it is either canals or wells. Every one here has wells as we are 60 miles from the river, which is the only surface water near us.
 

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I used to use several types of Irrigation methods when I farm. I used a well and flood irrigation on flat land, Sprinklers on hilly land, a pump from a creek, and use a well for irrigation on row crops from a canal.
 

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I used to use several types of Irrigation methods when I farm. I used a well and flood irrigation on flat land, Sprinklers on hilly land, a pump from a creek, and use a well for irrigation on row crops from a canal.
Is this the norm for your area?
 

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I live in NE Ohio and I think this is the driest it has ever been this early in the summer. I just use my well water and do direct watering with a hose, walking up and down my rows. I would love to have some T valves so that I could direct my grey water to my gardens....someday.......
 

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Canal water here also and we have eight water shares. We have an irrigation pond with a pump, so we run irrigation pipes on the front of our ten acres and flood irrigate the back. We've only lived here since last October, but this seems to work fine. We're like a green oasis with plenty of shade trees, right in the middle of a high desert! :)
 

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Is this the norm for your area?
Yes. We have no canals around. We use rivers creeks, and lakes or wells for water. We have reservoir on private property that are filled by using a pump in a creek to fill them. The one that I had has a 12 inch pump to fill it.
 

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Most irrigation here is with center pivots. Pumping from wells, Some gravity irrigation useing gated pipe from canals from the local reservoir. A small amount from pumps in creeks and rivers. Reservoir- canal systems are fully allocated so no new acreage. In many rescource districts there has been a moritorium on drilling new irrigation wells except as replacement.
 

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I can't imagine MI ever running out of water. However, nothing is falling from the sky this year so it's well water for our garden. I doubt if our well is big enough (or is it the pump and pipes large enough?) to water an entire pasture or field crop. I use overhead sprinklers in the evenings or very early mornings.
 

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We generally get enough rain to not worry about irrigation. Dry is the top inch or two gets dry. Last year tho the garden suffered a bit due to 6 weeks of no rain. This year the garden is good so far. I have about 4 more weeks of "dry" season. So it should be fine.

Our issue is the well is shallow and we are at the top of the hill. So when we don't get good rains it runs low as well. I'm thinking of making a water tank trailer for the garden. But it still wouldn't be used all that often.
 

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The Pacific NorthWET is another place that doesn't dry out much. :D Typically there's a span of maybe 2 months, about mid July-mid Sept, that we get very little rain, and the rest of the year... :eek: :hysterical:

Now, east of the mountains is a different story, but over here we're still in rubber boots.
 

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Around here, the norm is to let the rain water your crops. Some farms have deep irrigation wells, particularly in the central sands region of our state.
For the yard, we just use hoses and well water. So far, our water tables are still okay though we have been watering for weeks now.
 

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Am from tPacific NorthWet Please CAll (505)414-2267,_d’
DO NOT call the above number - the poster is posting on many threads. It's a scam.
 
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