Irish Dexters

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by ilikefathorses, Aug 13, 2005.

  1. ilikefathorses

    ilikefathorses My Horse Really Is Fat

    Messages:
    65
    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2005
    Location:
    In Utah! Yeehaw!!
    I have wanted to get a cow for a long time, and am considering an Irish Dexter (sort of like a miniature cow). Has anyone had Irish Dexter before and can give me some pros and cons? :cow:
     
  2. Sher

    Sher Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,009
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    We bought a small herd of them last winter. The only con so far..gotta get used to their horns.

    The pros..oh my..so many. Doxile and extremely easy keepers. Haven't been hard on the pastures or fences.

    We are waiting to see if they are easy calvers. They certainly have great bags on them.

    We are still learning about them..so far..we really like them. And I must admit that I was going into this semi-skeptical. Not anymore!
     

  3. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,274
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2005
    Location:
    Bristol, ny
    are they expensive?
    I too have been thinking very seriously about dexters but seems that they are quite pricey. saw one 400 lbs that was selling for $850. Thats gonna end up as expensive hamburger. They aren't listed as rare anymore by the ABCDEFG, I don't think.
     
  4. Hovey Hollow

    Hovey Hollow formerly hovey1716

    Messages:
    913
    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    We just bought our registered Dexter cow, bred to a registered Dexter bull for $900. I thought that was pretty reasonable for breeding stock. I'm sure it would probably vary by area. She is still settling in, but she always comes to the fence to see us. She is halter trained and let me fly spray her yesterday. I should have no trouble getting her calmed down and used to being handled so I can milk her in April.
    The breed is notorious for their calm gentle attitude. I am drawn to them for their smaller size. Not exactly miniature, their smaller sizes and ability to grow well on less pasture makes them ideal for our small acreage. As far as beef goes, cuts of meat will be a reasonable size and will be less overwhelming for our small family. We are planning on milking her. There has been some talk lately that the breed description of being a true dual purpose breed may be misrepresented, but I'm not looking for huge amounts of milk, just a few gallons a week. If you are interested in milking be sure and check out which bloodlines are more proficient milkers and try to buy in those bloodlines. My cow is bred to a bull with good milking bloodlines, so if mine doesn't give as much milk as I would like I have high hopes for the heifer calf she gives me (hopefully).

    Here are some good sources of information about Dexters.

    http://www.dextercattle.org/index.html

    http://www.dakodan.net/dexters/forum/index.php

    I know there is another dexter association and other forums, but these are the ones I am familiar with. I'm sure others can give you other links.
     
  5. linn

    linn Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    3,441
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2005
    Unless you are going to sell your bulls as registered breeding stock, be prepare to receive very little money for the sale of them. You can fatten them for your freezer. A lady we know raises Dexters. Every year she sends her bulls through the sale barn and gets hardly anything for them.
     
  6. Sher

    Sher Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,009
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    woodspirit..LOL..that was our heifer for sale. She is registered and she if for breeding stock. Of course a person could eat her if ya wanted to.

    We are hoping for bulls to be born. There are people around here that want a steer to fit into the freezer..they will fit that bill. I don't really think we have any intention of selling them through the sale barn.

    Heck..just with our relatives and friends..we have enough buyers for meat.
     
  7. RdoubleD

    RdoubleD Active Member

    Messages:
    40
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Location:
    N.W. Washington
    I have several dexters. I do not think that they are expensive when it comes to the smaller breeds of cattle. If anything they are the cheapest. If you are going to be running your cattle through a sale barn you better get the big ones that commercial breeders and feed lot buyers will want. Dexter are not ment to do that. They are for the people that want to raise their own beef, know where it comes from, and still have it fit into the freezer when the time comes.

    The Dexters make great small acreage beef or dairy animals for the adverage person. I have found that their size does not intemidated most people so they are willing to try to milk one or lead one around, even brush them. It is fun to see the reactions that poeple have to a smaller sized animals, I have larger breds too and they are just as friendly as my Dexters but my guest are not as comfortable around them.
     
  8. SherrieC

    SherrieC Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    874
    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2002
    Location:
    Indiana
    These are for sale because the lady's hubby died.



    I have a couple of heifers who have heifers at side and are rebred.
    There are a total of 8 head:
    2 year old Heifer w/newborn bull at side (3 weeks old)
    2 year old Heifer w/4 month old heifer at side
    14 year old cow
    5 year old cow
    5 year old bull
    2 year old bull
    The older cow needs to probably go to market.
    The others are all obviously in their prime. Unlike commercial cow herds,
    Dexters will calve yearly up until around 12 years of age.
    I would sell the whole herd for $2600.00 firm. If I send them to an exotic
    sale, they would go for that price each, especially the bull as he is
    magnificent (the 5 year old) and tame.
    All of them are able to be worked with if you wanted to do so, and obviously
    you would. You would need to get halters on them and lunge lines and start
    teaching them to lead. The old cow has a collar on believe it or not!<G>
    I would rather the herd go as a herd from here. If you took the cow and the
    2 year old bull to market (my recommendation) then you would immediately
    recoup part of your investment. The young bull calf would make great meat
    in around 7 or 8 months as a vealer.
    We have milked them and the 2 that have youngin's on them would easily give
    you milk for cheese and cream for butter as well which is nice. Do you have
    a chute? If not, you'd want to build one but they are easy to build and you
    would start the training for milking out in a chute. They are given grain
    every day and will do about anything for that green bucket of grain!<G>
    Let me know. I'm going to have to move them in the next few weeks as I
    don't have any desire to keep them at this point.
    Jennifer
     
  9. SherrieC

    SherrieC Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    874
    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2002
    Location:
    Indiana
  10. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

    Messages:
    1,970
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2005
    Location:
    Florida
    I saw one at an exotic petting zoo before and they have an aful lot of hair, and I mean really long. If you are up north they would be great, but if you are in a place where it gets really hot I would not suggest them unless you keep trimming their hair or something. Just remember though I have never had them and the people above are more helpful than me.
     
  11. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,274
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2005
    Location:
    Bristol, ny
    ;)
    thats funny but I think you're talking about highland cattle
     
  12. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,274
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2005
    Location:
    Bristol, ny
    wow that's a really good price. A bitmore than I have: about 2500 more. instead of a chute and halter training I was thinking of removing one back leg. That would make it easier to milk and I could have steak too. Probably would save on the fencing too
     
  13. Carol K

    Carol K Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    704
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Western NY
    Regarding the herd from the Lady whose husband passed away, I'm not sure if any of those Dexters are able to be registered or not. The only reason I say that is that when I checked, neither her or her husband showed up as being members of the ADCA and none of the animals were registered, unless I missed something, so please, if you want registered stock and you are interested in the above herd find out FIRST from the ADCA if they can be registered, if you don't want registered stock or to be able to sell registered stock then it's not a problem and you'll have yourself some nice cows.
     
  14. quailkeeper

    quailkeeper Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    465
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2004
    I have had dexters for several months and LOVE them. Small size but gentle. The line I have is actually dual purpose. My milk cow puts out four gallons a day and has a 2.5 month old bull calf at side that weighs 300+lbs. She is only 500 lbs. $850 is not a bad price just depends on sex and age, bred or not bred. Your probably going to pay $600-$800 for a registered heifer. Bull calves usually run $400-$600. There is a market for them even thru the sale barn. There are many people who desire to raise their own beef but can't afford a lot of land or a lot of feed. They don't want to feed up a huge steer and get literally a ton of meat that they won't be able to eat. I have raised beef cattle for several years including registered angus and I would never go back.
     
  15. rabbitgal

    rabbitgal Ex-homesteader

    Messages:
    1,508
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    How well do Dexters handle the heat? Someone told me they are very heat intolerant, but I'm thinking this person was confusing them with Scottish Highland Cattle. Dexters sound very appealing.

    How much milk, in pounds, does a good Dexter cow from dairy lines give?
     
  16. Paula

    Paula Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,104
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2002
    Location:
    TN
    Dexters handle heat fine. Ours keep the best body condition of all our cows with any temperature extreme, hot or cold.
    Several of our beef and one jersey cow got pinkeye this year. It's been a really bad year around here for it. Not one Dexter got it. They are all in the same herd, spend all their time together.