Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
SM Entrepreneuraholic
Joined
·
13,818 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am going to add roll insulation on top of the blown insulation in the attic. The blown insulation comes to the top of the joists.

I read where it was recommended to install the roll insulation perpendicular to the joists. Does it really make any difference? The attic is 25' wide and the roll is 25' long. It will save me a lot of cutting if I install between the joists instead of perpendicular to them.
 

·
Sock puppet reinstated
Joined
·
24,127 Posts
I am going to add roll insulation on top of the blown insulation in the attic. The blown insulation comes to the top of the joists.

I read where it was recommended to install the roll insulation perpendicular to the joists. Does it really make any difference? The attic is 25' wide and the roll is 25' long. It will save me a lot of cutting if I install between the joists instead of perpendicular to them.
They say that so it rides on top of the other insulation and does not compact it and to insulate over the joists to limit loss of heat through them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,250 Posts
The joists transfer heat and cold more readily. A common problem with not covering them is that the moisture in the house collects and condenses on the ceiling directly under the (cold) joists. This is made worse if there is no lath holding a sheet rock ceiling a little bit away from the joists. Any condensed moisture will cause staining and can rust sheet rock screws or nails.

Usually roll insulation is installed UNDER blown insulation. I agree that going crosswise will limit further compacting o the original insulation a little bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
Funny - I just finished this same project at our house and did most perpendicular except a few that were not easy. Had to slice some slots in the batts to fit around the supports in the trusses. I sure hope it brings the heat bill down!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,168 Posts
I want to add more attic insulation but our roof trusses are placed on every other beam and are made so that it wouldn't be possible to run roll insulation through them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,441 Posts
I would just add more blown insulation. The blown insulation actually seal air movement better than bat fiberglass. I would add another 16 inches or so.

Bob
 

·
SM Entrepreneuraholic
Joined
·
13,818 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I would just add more blown insulation. The blown insulation actually seal air movement better than bat fiberglass. I would add another 16 inches or so.

Bob
If you didn't have any help, would you still do blown insulation?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,569 Posts
Without help, blown insulation is pretty much out of the question. You need someone to feed the machine. It really is that much better than fiberglass, and easier to install, that it might be worth paying a neighbor kid or something to help. Shouldn't take more than two hours to do an average attic.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,441 Posts
Yes, I have done it by myself, but it can be a pain if it doesn't feed into the blower good. You can also by fiberglass that you blow in, but I haven't used it.

Bob
 
T

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
If you didn't have any help, would you still do blown insulation?

We are going to team up with a neighbor or two for this same project. If you buy more than 10 bags (or something) the machine rental is then free - and you then have a built-in slave laborer to help!

I can't remember if it was Lowe's or Home Depot that has the free machine rental...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Check with a larger insulation company. In our area Ohio, Indiana
a company called Mopfer Insulation usually can do the job for almost
the same cost we can buy the insulation alone for.
 

·
SM Entrepreneuraholic
Joined
·
13,818 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I already bought 13 of the 40 rolls of insulation I need, so there are no other options. The cost is less than half of what I was quoted by a contractor for blown insulation. Home Depot marked it down plus I get a 5% discount plus another $100 back from electric company.

The problem is there is little room to work. So far all I have done is move about 10 rolls into the attic and moved around a little. There isn't enough room to stand up so everything has to be done on my hands and knees.

Can I remove 2 of these supports and then put them back when finished? They are 1x4's nailed into the joists. The picture is misleading in that the height is only about 4' at the peak.



It would make it a lot easier to move around and move the rolls from one side to the other. If it's not safe to remove them, I will have to pay some little guy to do the job for me because there just isn't enough room for me to safely move around.

I already enlarged the access hole into the attic. I couldn't even get a roll of insulation through it. So far, enlarging the hole is the only thing that has been easy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,250 Posts
Rip a piece of plywood in half lengthwise to use as your work platform. I suppose that you could remove those braces, but the difficulty in replacing them and temptation to leave them off makes it a no-brainer to leave them. Drive a few nails through the end of a couple of 8' 1 x 3s and use them to grab and shove the insulation. You don't need to worry about vapor barriers (hopefully you bought unfaced) and the sticks will go where you can't go or reach.
 

·
SM Entrepreneuraholic
Joined
·
13,818 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Rip a piece of plywood in half lengthwise to use as your work platform. I suppose that you could remove those braces, but the difficulty in replacing them and temptation to leave them off makes it a no-brainer to leave them. Drive a few nails through the end of a couple of 8' 1 x 3s and use them to grab and shove the insulation. You don't need to worry about vapor barriers (hopefully you bought unfaced) and the sticks will go where you can't go or reach.
The problem is there isn't enough space for me to crawl through on my hands and knees unless I remove a set of braces. Creating a 30" wide corridor means I can do the job. A 15" corridor means I can't.

I'm working by myself, so I don't want to take a chance on getting stuck. I even have a rope tied to the step ladder in case I kick it over I can pull it back up.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top