Installing Sheet Vinyl Floor

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Tango, Feb 29, 2004.

  1. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to tear out the carpeting, which was a stupid mistake to begin with, and would like to replace it with sheet vinyl. It seems to be a resonably priced alternative to the hardwood floor I would really like to have- plus with the dogs, I think it would keep me from getting ulcers. Is it better to have it professionally installed? I'd rather not have to pay someone, and that would affect the quality of the vinyl I am able to purchase. If I can do it with a couple of frineds, I'd rather do it myself. Does anyone here have experience in that line?
     
  2. Fla Gal

    Fla Gal Bunny Poo Monger Supporter

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  3. idontno

    idontno Well-Known Member

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    Yes you can do it yourself.But is going to take some prepping.Clean,scrape,clean.Your floor will have to be good.If you have wood below it You will have to overlay it with plywood or compatable subflooring.(because all seams in wood floor will stand out bad after laying vinyl)All low places will have to be built up or leveled before plywood,to make it look good.Screws should be used and make sure that they are below floor level.Nails will work their way back out.Walk over it after you have plywood down..If you have any squeaks you will need to put more screws in that area to get them out.After you feel like it is ready then buy some floor patch,fill all seams and screw holes.after it drys you can take a putty knife and shave off the extra to make it smooth...Now you are ready for the hard part.LOL.I take a roll of heavy pressed cardboard,lay it out and cut it to size then lay it over vinyl and cut it to size.Think about what you are doing and it will come out nice.Just make sure you pattern is right.To get your pattern to hold in place cut slots()kinda like that.on pattern and tape it to floor and to your vinyl.These should be every 2 foot apart.After your vinyl is cut lay it out on floor.Fold back 1/2 and glue all over it.lay it down and go to other 1/2 and do the same.Before it gets stuck tight chase all bubble out to the outsides.(Take you hands and push the bubbles out).Hopefully you will not have to make a seam.If you do get back with me and we can go through that.Homelumber can be a great help for the beginner so don't be afraid to ask.They can get you all the supplies you need and some great how-to books on this subject.ANy more question just asked.We got a lot of good people here that can help.Hope I haven't total confused you ....idontno
     
  4. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Idontno has the basic steps

    floor underlayment is sold at home dippy, I think it's 1/4".

    Latex floor patch is a powder you mix with water and trowel like spackle to cover screw holes and underlayment seams.

    They also sell kits to install it yourself. The kit isn't really worth the money. You can use newspaper to make a template of the floor. Use masking tape to connect the sheets so you get one piece that you can pick up and lay on top of your new material.

    Try to eliminate seams. The seam sealing products are expensive and very toxic.
    good luck
     
  5. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone. Fla Gal I appreciate the lonk, that was a good introduction. I think we will leave this floor project for next year. I already have a fencing project for a 2.5 acre pasture and that will be enough for me. I hope next year to have more cash to get the lmainate floor I really want. This place is great. I always get so much help. I appreciate the time you gave to answer me gobug and idontkno.
     
  6. Soni

    Soni Well-Known Member

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    Don't make the classic mistake of laying the pattern on the back of the vinyl face up and getting it cut out in reverse (unless your room is perfectly square or round).

    Either put the pattern face up on the face of the vinyl or turn it face down on the back!
     
  7. Pops Black

    Pops Black Member

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    I installed flooring in a previous life. Carpet is easy; vinyl is hard to do well. It would be a shame to buy a better quality by saving money on the install just to either wreck the material or have it fail prematurely. There are lots of guys out there that say they are pros but are really hacks. I was called out to repair many jobs done by pros that failed prematurely, mainly due to poor seams – and I wasn’t the best installer around. Having said that, the best way to get a good job is go to the most reputable - oldest store in your area - NOT the cheapest, and insist that a crew that does ONLY vinyl does your job.

    Only try vinyl yourself if:
    Your money situation prohibits pro install.
    Your room is very simple – few doors, built-ins, cabinets, etc.
    There will be NO seams. You can get both 9’ and 12’ widths but they are very hard to handle


    One way you can save money is to do the prep yourself:

    Pull the doors, baseboards, carpet pad and strip (I assume you aren’t doing a bathroom – there you pull the commode as well). Old resilient tiles or vinyl/lino on the floor can stay as long as it is not loose or buckled or is heavily embossed, if it is it has to come up. NEVER sand old lino/vinyl or VA tiles (The VA stands for Vinyl Asbestos, and most everything else made before the 70’s had it as well)

    Slab on grade is easy. Get a good 4” replaceable razor floor scraper, a pair of kneepads, and some kind of hand broom. Start in a corner and scrape every inch of the floor sweeping as you go. Mark any depression, or void in the floor with a pencil – NOT ink.

    For wood floors, like idontno said, most strip flooring need underlayment, but plywood (especially Doug Fir) will ”telegraph” its grain through most vinyl.

    Use particleboard rated for underlayment. Use ring shank nails, you can pound them below the plane of the floor and fill – they won’t pop and screws will many times snap off trying to sink them in particle board.

    After the underlayment is down do the scraper thing. Be sure to go over every inch and make sure every nail is sunk.

    Now for wood or slabs fill all the depressions, cracks and nail holes. Use Fix-All brand patching compound, it cures like concrete so moisture won’t affect it. It sets up fast so mix a little at a time; use a nice wide trowel to feather out any changes in elevation. After it sets – 30-60min. go back and use your scraper to make everything really smooth, if you gouge out some fix-all be sure to fill it again.

    Now sweep or vac everything and make some lemonade for the installers, they’re gonna love you and any little prep work they have to do they may let slide. Because, as you’ll find out, riding that scraper around on your knees ain’t fun!

    Pops

    Saw you decided to put this off, but I already worked my one finger to the bone so up it goes anyway.
     
  8. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Good advice is never wasted Pops and your post was full of it!

    I have to ask an old floor man though, why particleboard underlayment? Personally, I just hate the stuff due to having to tear so much out in the past because it managed to get wet one way or another.
     
  9. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    I would buy ceramic tile and the supplies over the next year. It's cheaper and will last forever. Lots of people will probably disagree but Iput it in all my rentals now.


    mikell
     
  10. ed/IL

    ed/IL Well-Known Member

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    I do not like sheet vinyl. If you instasll it i would not glue the whole floor. Glue a few feet around the edges so when it is time to remove you can get it up. Dogs will be as hard on vinyl as hardwood floors.
     
  11. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    On the contrary, I appreciate the time I know it took to post all that information and I know it is beneficial to somone. I had asked a few friends if they would tackle the job with me and there were no takers due to the difficulties you mentioned. Also the front door opens to the living and dining areas, which are the two rooms (plus the hallways) that I want to do so that it look good is important to me. I want to wait until next year when I will - I hope- have the money to get the floor I really want and the money to pay a professional installer. A good floor will last a lifetime and a bad floor will seem to last a lifetime. :)
     
  12. shakeytails in KY

    shakeytails in KY Well-Known Member

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    How 'bout peel and stick vinyl? I have Cryntel brand (99 cents/sq.ft)from Lowes in my kitchen. They have beveled edges and look a lot like ceramic tile- not cheap looking at all. These tiles are thick! I installed them in my kitchen a couple of years ago and they still look great, and we have dogs, too.

    Another alternative is inexpensive laminate. We installed this in our new house, but we haven't moved in yet, so I don't know yet how it will handle the dog abuse. I paid $1.29 sq.ft, free pad, free shipping from www.profloors.com. for Shaw brand flooring.
     
  13. Soni

    Soni Well-Known Member

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    The peel and stick are nice! Just remember that you have to invest the same amount of "underfloor" prep, as even the smallest bumbs and ridges will show up (even under that thick stuff) when the sun hits it slantwise! (been there done that)
     
  14. idontno

    idontno Well-Known Member

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    Peel and stick tile....don't waste you money on it.It will shrink.Or you will get moisture,dirt in the seams,when you mop or spill anything on it,then it will start to come up.Or it will get brittle and crack around the edges.Will take a few years(5-6) .But this is just my 4 cents worth again.....idontno
     
  15. snoozy

    snoozy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sounds hellacious. I've got a bathroom on the second floor (bare plywood floor right now) in which I was thinking of putting vinyl, but the installers have a minimum sq footage that they bother with/charge for, which makes it overpriced. Anyone have any suggestions for other waterproof flooring to use which we could do ourselves without so much intimidating prepwork?
     
  16. Sheet vinyl can make a very nice floor, at an attractive price. You do need a good surface to start with - follow Pop's advice.

    What I like about sheet vinyl is the ease of cleaning and care..
     
  17. swamptiger

    swamptiger Active Member

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    snoozy;

    I would go with ceramic tile in a bathroom. Just use a 4" diamond cutting wheel to cut the tile. Score the tile with the wheel (don't cut it all the way through) and snap it off. The wheel will also grind sharp edges off.

    Ceramic tile is really not bad to work with once you get the "hang of it", and it lasts forever.
     
  18. snoozy

    snoozy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    But won't the grout get gross? And won't water seep between them?
     
  19. Pops Black

    Pops Black Member

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    Bare, particleboard is super flat, no grain to show through the vinyl. It will swell and disintegrate if it gets wet.

    Water is any hard surface’s biggest enemy. Poor seam sealing, leaky toilets, failing caulking around tubs and showers are the biggest reasons vinyl fails – that and tears from furniture. I have remodeled several old houses and invariably have had to replace not only the flooring but also the sub floor and even the floor joists under toilets.

    I prefer ceramic tile on cement backer board. It is something any handy dandy homesteader can do. Use sanded grout in the bath, it will stay nice as long as you use a sealer every year or two. Moisture won’t harm ceramic, if the floor stays wet all the time, moisture will just rot the sub floor and you’ll eventually have a sunken bathtub.

    Resilient tile is a good low cost option, use the most expensive adhesive you can find, I used to use Henry’s 356, it is waterproof when dry.

    Don’t use cheap peel ‘n stick! Idontno is exactly right. I don’t know about the stuff Shakeytails has, it sounds pretty good if it lasts. It’s probably is quieter and easier on the feet than ceramic, huh?

    Pops
     
  20. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    Ceramic tile over OSB no problem just seal it good for a bath. Buy a 59$ wet saw and a 20$ tile score rig. Once you do a little room you will go crazy with tile. It is easy. A bag of thinset does 80 sq ft @ 15$ per bag. Grout in any color 6$ a bag and tile from 50 cents per sq ft up.

    mikell