installing plastic edging

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by bugstabber, May 14, 2006.

  1. bugstabber

    bugstabber Chief cook & weed puller Supporter

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    I'm going to try and install that plastic edging (that comes in a big roll) around some of my flower beds. I'm sick of the grass taking over, and it's hard on the irises production. Plus I just don't have that much time to spend on them. Does anyone have tips on how to install this stuff? I've heard of using a couple flat shovels. Most importantly - will it at least slow down the grass infestation of my flower beds? Thanks, I'd appreciate any tips you have.
     
  2. swamp man

    swamp man Well-Known Member

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    I do landscapes and lawn maintenance for a living,and I aint very impressed with the stuff,and dont much care for how it looks either.It may hellp the grass invasion for a while,but this depends on a few things.what type of grass is it?If it's a runner type, eventually,runners will make their way under it.If the grass is coming up by way of viable seed making its way into the bed by way of the mower chute,getting slung in by a weed eater-whatever,your best defence is probably a pre-emergent herbicide.I take care of around 50 yards,and that stuff spares me alot of headaches.Most of them work very well,but the best one I have found is a product called "Snapshot".It works great on unwanted weed germination,also.Just dont use it anywhere that you intend to direct sow any seed.Good luck.
     

  3. wilderness1989

    wilderness1989 Well-Known Member

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    Been there done that, never again. Where you live the frost will heave it back out of the ground. I'd at least use something that is level with the ground so you can run a lawn mower wheel on it. Like a shallow trench with bricks that are level with the surface. :cowboy:
     
  4. Mid Tn Mama

    Mid Tn Mama Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Two things: I saw a wonderful yard where someone took old shingles that came off their house when reroofing and layed them on the ground next the the garden. The mower just rode on the shingles. You didn't see the edging and it made curves very well.

    I am looking into makeing a trench and using cement for this purpose instead of bricks (bricks would be harder to make curves and more expensive) Anyone tried this? I'm figuring a 4 " wide, deep trench that is even with the top of the ground.
     
  5. rocket

    rocket Well-Known Member

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    I tried digging trenches and pouring cement when I lived in Dallas. I made mine about 6 inches wide and deep and it worked pretty well, but it was a lot of work. Those cement bags are heavy. The end result also didn't look quite as nice as what comes out of those professional cement-edging machines.

    I've also tried the plastic edging and didn't like it much. The softer black stuff it a little flimsy. The green or brown fiberboard stuff is better, but still very thin. I think my favorite edging so far is benderboard (about 1/2 or 3/4 inches thick), but I have a tough time finding it.
     
  6. Marcia in MT

    Marcia in MT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    People in Seattle use a system we tried, and it works; basically, it creates a space between the grass and the flowerbed that the grass won't grow into.

    Looks something like this: | ____
    |/

    Dig straight down at the edge of the flowerbed for 2" - 3". Remove any soil and plant material in towards the flowerbed for perhaps 1", then gradually slant the soil back up to the level of the bed. This takes another 2" - 3". Roots won't grow into this air space so the grass stays put (unless, of course, it's totally aggressive like quackgrass and then you'll need to do something else).

    As long as you keep the grass cut so it doesn't bend over and shelter the open area, and you don't let mulch pile too thickly in it either, I found that grass would stay out. This is not a huge trench, either; just a nice little edge to the bed. I didn't find it took a lot of time and effort to keep it once I'd made it. Just Keeping the grass trimmed and upright was enough.
     
  7. bugstabber

    bugstabber Chief cook & weed puller Supporter

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    Thanks for the replies. We did actually try to install some of this stuff several years ago, and it ended up on the shelf. This gives me something to ponder.