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We are contemplating one more adventure. This time Canada. We've looked extensively at climate, culture, duo citizenship, etc. We are going to leave in May to actually start looking for property. Is there anyone out there that has moved to Canada from the U.S. If so, what were your surprises, good or bad? I am sure there is so much we haven't thought about. I ask this, because when we moved here to Kentucky from the far north, there were many surprises and had we known ahead of time, we wouldn't have moved here. We are trying to avoid that situation again. We are primarily looking in the Prince George, BC area and also Nova Scotia. Any input would be greatly appreciated. I know there are Canadians on board so help me out, Please. Jean from Ky.
 

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I would personally re think the Prince George area. We spent 3 weeks in Prince George in October, and we found it to be a very dirty, polluted, rude city. It has a rough culture to it, quite a bit of crime.
The surrounding area is beautiful, especially if you go further north. It might be better to settle outside of the city, maybe in a smaller town nearby. BC has alot to offer, don't restrict yourselves to one of the uglier cities here. :)
Good luck with your move. I hope you can find what you're looking for. If you have any questions on BC or Canada, feel free to pm me. I've lived in BC all my life, in many different areas, so I have alot of experience and knowledge on my province.
mtnhighirl
 

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What is it with BC and crime? Abbotsford in particular! I guess the thing of it what do you need to earn a living? I'd like to move to Nova Scotia, but it's hard to see where the money is earned. I could show up debt free and buy everything I need to farm just there's not many people to sell to. I'm in Ontario and would have to say there are a few too many people but it is easier to find work or paying customers to be self employed.
 

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BC cities are pretty bad for their crime rates, but the smaller towns aren't bad. The only crime we worry about here is ski and snowboard theft, nothing too threatening.
 

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I am A Canadian transplanted to Wyoming. Prince George itself can be a bit
ugly but the area around is beautiful. You are not looking to actually live in the city are you? I have several relatives all within 200 miles of there as well as living in the city.

Maybe if you gave us a bit more info on what you are looking for, we could give you better answers.
 

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Jean, I don't know if this will help you or not. There's a new group for Canadian farmers/homesteaders that just started. You might find some folks that could answer your questions.
http://groups.msn.com/CanadianLifeontheFarm

I envy you, to start on another adventure. :worship:
I'm still hoping to get out of this state too but I have to convince DH. :rolleyes:
It is funny how the things we learned after moving to this new area sure didn't show up on the visitors brochures or realtor's description. :(

Best of Luck
Kathy
 

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dandrea said:
If so, what were your surprises, good or bad? I am sure there is so much we haven't thought about. I ask this, because when we moved here to Kentucky from the far north, there were many surprises and had we known ahead of time, we wouldn't have moved here.
I'm a Canadian living in Indiana (lived in Cali, and ND), so I might be able to give some input. But what did you find in Kentucky that you didn't like? Where did you move from? What are your goals in the move?

Making good money in the Maritimes always seems to be a constant problem for that area.
 

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We aren't planning on moving to the city. Actually the place we were going to look at is south of Vanderloof.
Someone asked what I didn't like about Kentucky. Well, it is hard to describe the difference in the culture from what I was used to. Since I hate to sound too deragoatory, I'd best leave the subject alone. Let's just say the standards are very different and we hate the heat and humidity.
Our goal is to semi retire. Our place here is worth quite a bit more than what a similar place in Canada would cost.
Some of my worries are really about duo citizenship and what surprises may come along with that, such as would we be taxed on some of our money twice? etc. And costs that we are not used to.
We lived in the U.P. of Michigan prior to moving here, so we are used to winter. The U.P. was very Canadian in culture.
I was surprised to hear your input on crime being so bad. But, I think it is in this area also. Jean from Ky
 

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Before you go to Canada to look for property, check out the Canadian Multiple Listings, www.mls.ca. This will give you a better idea of the cost of property in Canada and what you're getting into. BTW, check out central and northern Nova Scotia and western New Brunswick.
 

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You do need to do your research first. Americans can own property but pay more when selling it. You need to research the whole idea of citizenship. You can be dual but getting to that point is not an easy process.

Vanderhoof is supposed to be great. All the areas around there are a bit rugged
Winters are cold and mosquito's big in the summer. While Canada can be more tolerant, you are looking at small town, bush areas. The working base is mostly logging and mining in the north. Both have had hard hits in the last decade and therefore impact the vitality of the area.
 

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Although I have no pratical experience in moving to canada I do remember reading that canada does require certain things from immigrants. They need to be healthy and show an ability to make an income or have a income as they really don't want americans moving there just to get onto the healthcare/welfare programs they have without first contributing to their society. They do allow american citizens to own property and vacation there but I think you are limited to a 30 day visit without geting a visa, not sure how long you have to come back here to qualify for another visit.
Kirk
 

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An American can have a maximum stay of 6 months without a visa, etc. The majority of the properties that have been sold at the resort in the last few years have been to Americans, mostly from Washington. So it's not difficult for you to buy here, I don't know much about dual citizenship, etc though. I know it's not too hard to get a working visa here, we have liftees, ski instructors, waitresses, etc from all over the world, and quite a few have stayed permenantly, and are going through immigration.
:D Good luck to you!
 

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I don't think you can go wrong moving to Canada.

He are a few images of our place about 3 hours north and east of Prince George, BC, near Mobbely Lake, BC, we love it. The Homesteading part is not your question, but the answer to another poster, kind of brings things up-to-date,

How To Homestead
Lease some land from the Canadian Government, for no cost per acre, then get all the trees cut down on 64 of the 160 acre "Quarter" [Section] - the minimum building "lot" size, then pile and burn the excess trees, remove all the stumps or cut off and then "break" or first time plow that land. Then root pick it, disc it three or four times, harrow it, then pick again, then seed to crop, harvest, then pick again, the following year then seed to crop plus hay.

At the same time, build a log cabin, outhouse, water system or well, prepare and plant a garden and can it, get some hives operating, and raise a faimly, chop 20 cords of fire wood the first year. And have a supply of money available or "work-out" at first. Make everything, use everything, fix everything, understand everything about how things work, think and do for yourself (and neighbour if available).

After about 40% of the land is "proved-up" then you get Title for it, you buy it for $8 per acre from the Government.

Do all of that more or less on-your-own, except for family help, and help of God and Saints and Sages of all time.

Then, that is Homesteading. And that can be done today, by almost anyone with good health and a strong will - if that is God's will too.

As far as "Homesteading"-"Today" goes, I think that those words have some other meaning.

Alex


Neighbour's Cat With Piler


Neighbour's Tractor and Disc


Picking Roots On New Land


Blue, Cabin, and Stars, First Year, Moberly Lake, BC, Canada
The second part,

OZ

Thanks.

I don't know about the "lease-prove-up-purchase" from the Govenment.

However, three years ago, we bought the new Quarter for $34,000 (about $22,000 USD at the time), it had been logged, with the "islands" of Pine, Spruce, Birch, Diamond-Back Willow, and Poplar still standing that are visible in the images above. Fences on all four sides. We have about 120 acres that we are/can "prove-up" for ourselves, and about 40 wooded that we will never change (see above images - that's what we are doing now).

The $34,000/22,000 that we paid is about equal to todays cost for clearing and fence for 160 acres.

The rest, stump removal or cut-off of stumps, piling, burning, breaking, disc, roots, planting, etc is the same as if leased/proved-up/purchased.

The answer is YES you can, (sort of) Homestead Today (OK its not really Homesteading - but close enf, right, I give up).

Three years ago, we moved our cabin to this Quarter, and started our "Homestead" process over again, after thirty years, life is good.

Alex



You may notice that we now have chosen "power" or gird. Maybe we will change. We did before, and know how to live without power, and we want to use it now, we don't have to use it and if it fails that's OK. However, it works for us. Enjoy.
Yes Enjoy Canada, were ever you land, best of luck.

Alex
 
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