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Yet again our dogs? raided a nest and we now have two newborns in a shoebox on a heating pad. The only success I've had in the past was putting with a domestic mother who reared it with her own. No such luck, I don't have any does with newborns this time.

I'll do my best, but there's little hope. Can anyone suggest what I might use to introduce milk? The best I can think of is the corner tip of a shammy-type cloth dipped in milk.

tx
 

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Syringe?
 

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yeah even one of this rubber bulb syringes could work I think... and I agree with the goats milk...
Check me, please, but I seem to remember that wild rabbits only get fed about once per 24 hours, so the milk is incredibly energy-high. If that's the case, don't be afraid to juice it up with some added sugar, and cream or olive oil. Just make sure they don't get scours from it.
 

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Do not use olive oil. Olives are not native to the US and wild rabbits are not equipped to handle it. Also, much to our dismay we recently discovered that olive oil is toxic to domestic rabbits.

I've heard goats milk with corn syrup is good to use. Don't use a plunger syringe, you have too little control over the drops. Eye droppers and medicine droppers are okay to use. Pet bottles work but are really expensive and are harder to clean.
 

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I successfully raised two wild kits last summer. Please google baby rabbit care, you will find a wealth of information.

Keep the kits in a very quiet, dark area. I kept mine in a large plastic tub filled with hay, gave them a little bowl of water, and then bottle fed them. The little tiny kitten size bottles at Tractor Supply work greats and I only used KMR brand of milk replacer, it was the only one that was recommended for kits. It needs to be pretty warm or the kit won't drink it though. You will know if your kits are getting enough if they have a full tummy...skinny kits mean they aren't getting enough.

Here is a good guide for you:
GENERAL FEEDING OF ORPHANED RABBITS Age + Amount (This WILL vary depending on type of rabbit.) Use KMR (Kitten Milk Replacer). Add a pinch of acidophilus (AKA Probiotic capsules) to all formula to promote healthy gut flora. Other formulas vary depending on the region of the country.

Newborn to One Week: 2 - 2+1/2 cc/ml each feeding (2 feedings daily).
1-2 weeks: 5-7 cc/ml each feeding (2 feedings daily).
(depending on bunny..may be much LESS if smaller rabbit).
2-3 weeks: 7-13 cc/ml each feeding (2 feedings daily). Bunnies whose eyes are still CLOSED need to be stimulated to urinate and defecate before or after each feeding. Again, seek a professional on this. Domestic eyes open at about 10 days of age. Then start introducing them to timothy and oat hay, pellets and water (always add fresh greens for wild ones--dandelion greens, parsley, carrot tops, grated carrots, all fresh, watered down). See below for detail.
3-6 weeks: 13-15 cc/ml each feeding (two feedings--again, may be LESS depending on size of rabbit! A cottontail will take so much LESS--about half of this! .)

Good luck! Do not handle them except to feed them. Keep the container they are on closed at all times with air holes to vent. No animals around them at all. No kids. No petting or cuddling, these are wild animals and you can not keep them!! If they are white tail bunnies it is illegal to keep them, so when they are old enough release them back into the area you found them.
 
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