Indoor Kerosene Heater

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by jeannie242, Nov 7, 2004.

  1. jeannie242

    jeannie242 Well-Known Member

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    Hi,
    I was wondering if anyone has ever heated the inside of their home with an Indoor Convection Kerosene Heater?
    I have a 4 room house, and the furance is in bad shape. I have thought about using electric heaters, then saw the Indoor Kerosene Heaters that will heat up to 1,000 sq ft. I am in the midwest and it gets pretty cold.
    Are they safe? Which would be cheaper for me? Electric or Kerosene?
    I would love any advice.
    Thanks Jeannie
     
  2. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    It used to be cheaper to heat with kerosene.But with the higher cost of fuel now days I'm not real sure.(Id think its still is a bit cheaper)

    Kerosene heaters are fairly safe as far as the risk of fire from the fuel goes.Most of the house fires here are from objects being placed to close to the heaters.Kerosene burns clean (no carbon monoxide) But they do let of a little black shoot when lighting them.They do produce a very dry heat that is hard on some people.I myself wake in the morning with a very dry throat from them.Id recommend running a humidifier or you might set a pan of water on top of it to help add moisture back to the air.A humidifier by the bed really helps!
    I like the rectangular type heaters best they usually have a blower to help move the heated air around the room.And a removable tank that can be filled out side and then just set back in the heater.(we did this with out shutting the heater off,but they recommended that you turn it off first) There also great for warming your self in front of (like setting in front of a fire place).The round ones do not put off hardly any heat on the sides,it all goes straight up.But the rectangular ones do get the floor rather hot in front of them (note, not as hot when the blower is running).If you have the square self adhesives vinyl floor tiles or carpet i wouldn't recommend one.Also i might add that Kerosene is really messy.You will end up dripping and or spilling some ever once and a while.(every time for use. :D )

    As far as electric heaters go.I bought a stand up model a year or so ago for $45.That I'm really happy with.It has two ceramic round rods that put off heat rather than wires or what not.I cant say how energy efficent it is but i can say its hotter than any i have seen lately,and the temp controls actually work. My MIL has it on loan or id write down the model for ya.
    I'm thinking the new water filled heaters are the best efficiency wise.

    Good luck!
     

  3. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    Keros have to throw off carbon monoxide, don't they? Doesn't ALL combustion throw off carbon monoxide?

    Anyhow, I used portable kero heaters for years in my cottage, and the people living there now use them. They gave me headaches. They leave a window open to vent the place. The soot gets on everything (wipe your finger across a window and it comes up black) and they smell bad.

    But they also kept the pipes from freezing.

    I now use a Monitor brand exterior venting kero heater in the farmhouse. Can't say enough nice about it. With the woodstove going on one side of the house, and the monitor set to 55 to keep the other side (which would have the kitchen and bath in it..bad layout) from freezing, I burned (drum roll please...)

    About 100 gallons of fuel over the past... 2 YEARS. In Vermont. Where last winter it was -30 for better than 2 weeks straight, and -20 for another 3 weeks.
     
  4. tiny

    tiny Member

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    We use a kerosen heat last winter and on agallon of fuel could heat the house. It toke 2 gallons a day. The only time the furnace would run is when it was real cold out. We have been heat the house withit know and we have not had the furnance on. We also have a fan over the regester in front of the heat to push the heat throughthe heating ducts for more even heat.
     
  5. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    I have 2 Honeywell electric heaters that are the oil-filled radiator type that I like very much. They don't get hot enough to pose a fire hazzard from objects touching them & they retain heat even when the thermostat has cycled off temporarily. The controls are electronic & include a timer & are adjustable from 600 watts to 1500 watts, with a variety of settings. I have NG heat in the form of 1 lg & 1 sm wall heater, but I use the electric heaters to supplement the gas heat in areas that are away from the radiant heat from the wall heaters, as they are not forced-air. I would highly reccomend these heaters as being very safe if you have small children or pets. When I bought them 2yrs ago they were about $80 at Walmart. The only drawback is that if the elect. goes out they are useless. I see them as a supplemental form of heat that have made the colder parts of our house, that are away from the wall heaters, more comfortable.I don't think that I could reccomend them as a primary heating source, but they are clean, portable,fairly efficient, very safe, & they give off no fumes or smells & don't have to be refuled in the middle of the night. Good luck with your choices. There are many. :) P.S. ... the 2 that I have Will heat my 1100sq ft house, so they do put out quite a bit of heat on the highest settings!
     
  6. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Kerosene heaters with the blower units are a lot more efficient in circulating air.

    Check with your homeowner's insurance agent. Some will drop you in a heartbeat if they find you are using a portable kerosene unit and/or not pay if fire was caused by such a unit.

    Go only with professionally installed and outside vented equipment.

    Ken Scharabok
     
  7. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

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    I used freestanding kero heaters for three years and each year
    ended up with bronchitis. I've never had it before or since. I
    currently have a wood stove, supplemented by an unvented
    propane gas heater (permanently attached on the wall behind my
    computer chair) which doesn't give me any problems. If you have ANY
    respiratory issues, I definitely would not recommend kero heaters,
    except as emergency backup if your main source konks out. I also have
    a carbon monoxide detector, just in case there is a malfunction.
    Good luck and stay warm.
    Ann
     
  8. Jack in VA

    Jack in VA Well-Known Member

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    Cost of operation depends on what you pay for fuel. I pay 3.5 cents per KWH , so a 1000 watt heater costs 3.5 cents an hour. I know fuel oils and propane are up as much as 30% this year. You should be able to do the math. Might wanna go with a combination of the two. I have an oil-filled radiator type heater with three wattages. The lowest setting will keep my bedroom plenty warm all night.
    BTW , carbon monoxide is a product of incomplete combustion. Operating properly you should get only carbon dioxide , which can give you a headache, if you have no fresh air ventilation.
     
  9. jeannie242

    jeannie242 Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all for your advice and opinions, keep it coming.
     
  10. Dreams30

    Dreams30 Lady Rider

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    We use a kerosene heater and the price of kerosene just went up. It does keep us toasty warm though. I wouldn't use it in a tightly sealed house (ours is a definately not) and we do turn it off when we go to bed for safety.

    Also we are in South central Texas so it doesn't get as cold here.
     
  11. Hoop

    Hoop Well-Known Member

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    I remember my father used to keep one of those portable kerosene heaters in our milkhouse of the dairy farm, to keep the water lines from freezing.

    What a piece of crap. Yes, it kept the water lines from freezing......but the walls of the milkhouse were turned black several times from the heater emiting billows of black smoke.

    IMHO, anyone even considering using one of these death traps inside a residence is playing Russian Roulette.

    They now make direct vent heaters that perform efficiently and with safety to boot.
     
  12. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    I would never use kewrosine, the fumes can be deadly. and there aren't any unvented stoves on the market that are safe. WE use wood. you can go to a TSC< or a walmart, or a lowes, or a home depot, and get a wood stove for around one fifty dollars. and up. they are save to burn, and they do a great job. they have one i am eyeing. it sells for 495. them you can get a blower to go on it. and they really work great. my neighbor had one. heated a huge old farm house with it. really want it bad.
    or if you have a furnace already, buy a wood add on, what a difference that they make. and the heat goes right up your duct work. but wood is the way to go. and it is safe, and no fumes. remember, if you are an asthamatic, kerrosine makes it worse, and they really smell bad. OI would die, if I used one. and there have been deaths from them . also from un vented gas stoves, and from unvented gas heaters. so stay warm but use your head, and always vent your heaters. and stoves.
     
  13. jeannie242

    jeannie242 Well-Known Member

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    You said" I could get a wood stove for around one fifty dollars at walmart or home depot? Is that one hundred and fifty dollars? And are they safe to use in a small home ? Thanks
     
  14. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    TSC, or farm ,mhome and ranch, would be a better place, but yes, they all carry them, and if you have a small house you don't need a big one, and it will keep you warm and very safe.
     
  15. jeannie242

    jeannie242 Well-Known Member

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    My only worry is we have no chimney or ventilation except windows, so would it be safe in a small 4 room house? Thanks, Sorry so many questions but this is all so new to me. Jeannie
     
  16. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    Good !@#$$%^&*!!!

    Stop right there. NO. NO NO NO NO NO. It would NOT be safe for you to use an wood stove. It would not be safe for you to use an unvented Kero heater. NO.

    NO.

    You need to either contact your local gas company or the firm that sells Kero and ask them about vented heaters, or you need to buy a plug in oil filled electric radiator type heater as the other poster said (he uses Honeywell heaters).

    Do NOT.. Do NOT put any kind of open flame heater into your home if you don't understand EXACTLY the limitations of that heater. ABSOLUTELY do not even consider putting a wood burning, coal burning, or briquette burning unit into your home. You are risking your life to do so. These systems MUST be vented outside of the home.

    Ok... I now need to get my heart rate back to normal...
     
  17. jeannie242

    jeannie242 Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, I hope your heart rate is back to normal. :)
    I didn't think I could use one in the house without some sort of vent, I just wanted to make sure.
    I am going to get the electric radiator type heaters for my house. Thanks again. Jeannie
     
  18. cloverfarm

    cloverfarm Well-Known Member

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    I guess my dad would be considered a homesteader so I grew up with Kero-Sun heaters and wood stoves. (And an outhouse for awhile but I digress)

    The woodstove MUST have a chimney or stove pipe of some sort, and a fire-proof area around it. Ours had a brick wall on two sides and a brick hearth. He now has a different type of stove that seemed to need less space around it ...?

    My mom's childhood home had a pot-bellied stove and one winter when my Grandma was deathly ill it was Mom's job to keep the stove going. She put so much wood in that the whole thing glowed red and she said all she could do was just stare at it, she was so scared (and missed her dad who had died a year or so earlier)

    The folks got away from wood-burning so much of the time after my mom had a spell of migraines every day or every other day ... and I think they thought the wood stove (fumes or gasses) might hve contributed

    But, you must research your options.

    We also had a Kero-Sun heater and I don't care for the smell of kerosene. As a matter of fact, got migraines a few times due to the kero fumes.

    I think they are kind of a mixed blessing.
    My 2 cents worth ...
    Ann
     
  19. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Do a google search for Monitor heaters. It is a kerosene unit with through the wall exhaust and an efficient heat exchanger.
     
  20. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    yes, wood stoves must be vented through a chimney, and you can get a kit, very reasonable, but they don't give off the deadly fumes of kerosine, or propane. those to will kill you, and so will oil. I would much rather put up a chimeny, and be safe from fumes, than to have the deadly fumes. even if tey don't kill , they do cause head aches, and other side effects.
    that is why we have wood.