Inbreeding & breeding season

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by Unregistered-1427815803, Jul 28, 2004.

  1. I'm a novice and know almost nothing about sheep. I have a gentleman and lady and their single female offspring. I just heard that inbreeding in sheep poses no problem. Is this true??? So I don't have to separate the lamb from the ram?

    Also, are sheep like goats with regard to breeding season -- roughly August through February?

    Thanks. Sorry for my ignorance.
     
  2. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Breeding season depends on the breed but yes in general terms that's not a bad calendar. I wouldn't breed daughter to father and you certainly can get problems or at least less than sterling results easier than fame and glory with close inbreeding. Again breed will make a difference, some are bound to tolerate it better than others.
     

  3. BetsyK in Mich

    BetsyK in Mich Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I certainly WOULD NOT breed dad to daughter. Like Ross said, you are likely to end up with bad results. When you do this kind of close breeding your more apt to get the worst genetic traits, not to mention birth defects, etc. Since your just starting out with sheep better to have a good/easier experience the first time lambing. Check around and see if you can find an unrelated ram to put your ewe lamb with in the fall. When you breed determines when you lamb, so think carefully about newborn lambs and cold weather, etc. I put my ram with the ewes in November (around the 15th) and have lambs in April (weather warm, nice grass for grazing, etc.)

    Since you have these animals you know about worming on a regular cycle, the right minerals and you had them sheared in the spring, right?
     
  4. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    It depends on your purpose in doing so. If it is for meat production on the homestead it would not likely be a problem. Most of our current "breeds" are the result of inbreeding. (breed===inBREEDing) Some breeds are inbred enough that they are missing some chromosomes. The proponents of those breeds claim it was useless information stored on those chromosomes. The proponents of other breeds claim the first has lost its genetic diversity
     
  5. Thank you, everyone. I will continue to keep Bathsheba separate from Big Turk! (The whole thing sounded fishy to me!! What's troubling is my information came from a genetics graduate school student!)

    As for worming, yes -- although how often would you recommend? . . . and as for shearing -- they are a self shedding breed. No shearing required. They have been beautiful this summer with their sleek black coats!

    As for minerals -- I've been using salt with trace elements -- putting out the same for my calves and goats and sheep -- free choice -- is this OK?

    Thanks again.
     
  6. http://www.critterhaven.biz/conbreed.htm
    An excellent article on breeding sheep with a small flock

    I use a mineral block for our hair sheep and offer them a general purpose salt block.

    No automatic de-worming. I practice rotational grazing and have a kit to check for worm load. I have learned that certain plants/trees in our pasture are beneficial prophylactics against worms.

    There is a website with some excellent research and articles regarding parasites, but I don't have the url handy at the moment. I'll add it later.


    Shepmom
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  7. shepmom

    shepmom Well-Known Member

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  8. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    No experience with mixed salt and mineral I use both free choice loose (not blocks) and seperate. I have used the molasas tubs with mineral and they do work well, I keep meanign to try a mineral block, as gettign enough mineral in the beasts here is difficult. The only major difference in mineral for goats and cattle for sheep is the absense of added copper in sheep mineral. Sheep should not have added copper without a vet script.
     
  9. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    for worming, try diatomaceous earth. about a teaspoon a day in their feed or treats. It controls worms in the gut and flies in the stool, and is completely otherwise inert and organic. On your minerals, it depends on your breed as to whether there is too much copper for the sheep. Enough for goats is generally too much for sheep